The parlour suite B52 54 56

  • Thread starter Lesley Jean-Baptiste
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Lesley Jean-Baptiste

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while looking at the movie i noticed that in one of the bedrooms in the suite that cal and rose occupied there were 2 beds. i thought that first class rooms only had one berth? also did anyone find it peculiar that the parlour suites are known to have two bedrooms but there were six passengers (2 maids, cal, rose, ruth and lovejoy). where did the mother sleep? plus if we are to assume that the three of them shared the 2 bedroom parlour suite why wasn't she aroud when rose was having here portrait drawn.
i also must state that i think James Cameron did a good job. yes there may have been historical errors and what have you but he did his best to capture the essance of the titanic. of course i don't buy the jaded little rich girl looking to get out of what is a perfectly finelifestyle. but you must appeal to the audience and 'everyone' loves a romeo and juliet type story.if he didn't make up the characters and only stuck with the actual people on board then it would have just been another documentary about the titanic and mostly history buffs would look at it and probably critique it just as much as they did this movie.
through my searches on the internet about the titanic, i did come across something that said that survivers related a story saying that there of course was a rush to get into the last of the boats and a crewman was threatening to shoot the people if they didn't restrain themselves. it goes on to say (as depicted in the movie) that there was a continuation in the pushing and the officer shot someone the shot himself. the witnesses who survived said that they believe it was Mr Murdoch. that's probably why JC put that in the movie. in addition to which Mr Murdoch's family was not there to witness whether this was or was not how he died.

sorry for rambling on just wanted to get my point across.

Lesley
 
Dec 6, 2000
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Hello Lesley,

Both the bedrooms of Parlour Suite B-52/54/56 had two beds. One 4 foot wide the other a standard bed. - The beds faced fore-aft. Cameron got that wrong and had one with the head or foot facing the side of the ship. - No beds in 1st or 2nd Class were ever in that position. - see the attached

The Suite also came with a Servant's Room B-102; which was an inside 3-berth stateroom. One would guess the maids would have been in that room. Ruth and Rose would have shared; and Lovejoy would either have shared with Cal or had a room elsewhere. - Few passengers would stay in their rooms.

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Lesley Jean-Baptiste

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Hey Lester,
Thanks for the info. it really helped. where did you get the pic of the parlour suite?
 
Dec 6, 2000
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I think that particular deck-plan is from the Father Browne deck-plan in EE O'Donnell's: The Last Days of the Titanic.
Wels has a similar plan in her book: Titanic Legacy of the World's Greatest Ocean Liner.
 

Steve Olguin

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Mar 31, 2005
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Lovett clearly referenced the fact that Ruth had her own stateroom when they were discussing the whereabouts of the Diamond.
 

Johan Jonsson

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Apr 4, 2005
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That is true, but after the ship struck the iceberg, Ruth is standing in their suite wearing only a nightgown. Also she says to one of the maids: "Go back and turn the heaters on in our rooms, I'd like a cup of Tea when I return." Ofcouse she could have just meant that the maids would go to her cabin and turn the heat on, but most likely she is referring to B52-54-56. Also the fact that there are two beds in Cal's room is telling us that she might have stayed there aswell. Renting Ruth her own private cabin would have been very expensive, but who knows? Maybe Cal was that desperate to have some privacy with Rose...;-)
 
Dec 6, 2000
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That is the current consensus.

Eaton & Haas would have us accept that the Henry Clay Fricks had the booking. After they cancelled Morgan took it over and when he cancelled it was assumed by J Horace Harding and his wife. - They later transferred to the Mauretania.

It is not clear if they thought the George W Vanderbilts and the Robert Bacons also had the booking. - The Vanderbilts sailed on the Olympic [although their valet Frederick Wheeler lost his life on the Titanic], while the Bacons were delayed and sailed on the maiden voyage of the France.
 
May 3, 2005
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Johan Jonsson-

"Renting Ruth her own private cabin would have been very expensive, but who knows? Maybe Cal was that desperate to have some privacy with Rose
...;-)"

Also - for someone of Cal's wealth the extra expense would have been of little consequence but who knows ? .... ;-)
 
Nov 6, 2004
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Steve Olguin said:
"Lovett clearly referenced the fact that Ruth had her own stateroom when they were discussing the whereabouts of the Diamond."

Also, when Rose and Jack entered the suite for the drawing scene, Jack asks Rose if Cal might return. He doesn't mention Ruth, as if there was no real chance of her coming back to the suite. This supports the theory that Ruth was supposed to be berthed elsewhere, but certainly doesn't prove it.
 

Johan Jonsson

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Apr 4, 2005
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good point there... And I do not think that Rose would have been naked if she knew that her mother could dome back soon, or perhaps that was part of the thrill for her? I really do believe that Ruth had her own stateroom, but in that case, near Caledon and Rose.
 
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Jeffrey Word

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I always thought that Ruth and Rose shared a room, Cal and Lovejoy shared another, then a room where the maids would go or whatever. Because they weren't married yet, and back then it was not considered as "appropriate" for a man and a woman to share the same room unless married. That's just my little theory.
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Jeff.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>Because they weren't married yet, and back then it was not considered as "appropriate" for a man and a woman to share the same room unless married.<<

Well, it wasn't as if Cal didn't try. Remember something along the lines of "I was hoping you would come to me last night."

Mmmmmmhmmmm...for what?
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Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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This ground has been covered in other threads. The sleeping arrangements are clearly specified in Cameron's original screenplay, which refers to scene locations such as 'Rose and Cal's suite' and 'Ruth's suite'. Cal and his safe are in B54 (blue decor and brass beds); Rose is in B56 (red decor and wooden beds). The screenplay includes many 'stage directions' which confirm that, for instance following the drawing scene Lovejoy enters the sitting room and then 'goes through Cal's room towards her (Rose's) room'.

The only scene scheduled for Ruth's suite had been the corset scene, but Cameron changed the location during shooting to B56, so that Rose rather than Ruth could be shown as the corset wearer, being symbolically bound into an uncomfortable situation. Ruth's suite therefore is never seen, but there is an early line of dialogue in which Cal refers to having pulled strings to book the most luxurious suites (note plural) on the ship - implying he might even have booked both the promenade suites - the line serves to inform the audience that Cal is 'rich beyond meaning'. In any case, it's quite clear that Rose was with Cal in B52/4/6 and Ruth was out of the way in a different suite. In the real world of Edwardian society, Rose would have been installed in a bedroom in Ruth's suite, not Cal's, but dramatic license was necessary to suit the plot.
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Jul 11, 2001
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If memory serves me right, the next stateroom aft of their suite did have a connecting door. So I would imagine a large party could book an infinite combination of rooms as needed.

I also recall reading somewhere that some of the Servants that were not needed on the ship, were booked in Second class. Didn't the Vanderbuilts luggage and one of their servants go down with the Titanic even though they did not sail on it?
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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There was a chain of interconnecting doors from B84 all the way forward to B58, but no connection from there into the promenade suite.

The Vanderbilts apparently changed their booking in response to concern expressed by Mrs V's mother, who took the fairly common view that it was tempting fate to travel on the maiden voyage of an unproven ship. So it pays to listen to mother!
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