The parlour suite B52 54 56

  • Thread starter Lesley Jean-Baptiste
  • Start date
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Mrs. Vanderbilt's mum wasn't all that far off the mark. I don't know if she expected the ship to actually sink, but then maiden voyages were absolutely notorious for problems. The crews are on the bottom edge of the learning curve and don't have a lot of time working with each other, and brand new ships are filled with technical glitches that need to be made right.
 
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Lesley Jean-Baptiste

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"The sleeping arrangements are clearly specified in Cameron's original screenplay, which refers to scene locations such as 'Rose and Cal's suite' and 'Ruth's suite'"
I was unaware of this fact. thank you for clearing it up Bob.
 
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Lesley Jean-Baptiste

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Does anyone else think that rose was a bit crazy from the start. Here she was living the good life and she wanted to leave it. There were people just a few decks below her who were going to america to try to make it, and who would have given anything to get to the level that she was lucky enough to be born into. I think she was a depressive. Why couldn't she see the good in her situation. Plus she claims that the people around her were mindless and shallow, i doubt that every single person in first class was like that. At least one person must have had their feet on the ground.
It gets worse when you find out that she never told her 'new' family (children, grandchild, husband) about her experience on the Titanic. I think that knowing about your ancestry links you to the past and gives you a sense of completeness. Not telling your family about their history is like lying to them. And if those guys weren't looking for the heart of the ocean then her granddaughter would have never know about her families past. Thats a story that you should want to keep in the family and pass it on for generations. As a person who knows little about her ancestry i felt like she was robbing her family of important references to their past. All i know of my past is mostly speculation, few facts, because things were kept secret and no one bothered to record or find out about things. Which brings me to think that rose may have been depressive because only a depressive would do those things (want to leave a life of privalege) and see the glass half full and not share important events of her life with family. And there was nothing good about throwing the diamond over board. That could have been given to the grand daughter as a family heirloom, another great link to her past. It would be the family heirloom with a great story.

sorry again for ranting
 
May 3, 2005
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Lesley-

Your insight on the "Rose" character was very interesting. I once took a course in Shakespeare at Texas A&M U. and the professor was also always doing character analyses and psychology of the characters such as "Falstaff". You would have done very well in English 312 ! :)

However, I think we'll have to cross this off to "dramatic license" by James Cameron. LOL.

"The best I've seen ma'am.....Hardly any rats !"
 
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Lesley Jean-Baptiste

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Well Robert I am a Psychology student. But i get what you mean by 'dramatic license'. James Camerons' sucks. LOL, just kidding.
 
Nov 6, 2004
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Bob Godfrey said:
"This ground has been covered in other threads. The sleeping arrangements are clearly specified in Cameron's original screenplay, which refers to scene locations such as 'Rose and Cal's suite' and 'Ruth's suite'."

Thank you, Bob. I should have done a little more digging.

I know this is a movie thread, but since the subject was mentioned above, I wondered about Fred Wheeler’s ET biography stating his last residence as Bath, England. Would this be likely if the G.W. Vanderbilts employed him in the US? His longer bio, accessible from that same page, says he was born there, so perhaps he still considered it his official home?

Trying to reconcile those two biographies made me question the story about the Vanderbilts. I found the story of Wheeler’s Titanic voyage intriguing both because of the local Titanic connection (Biltmore Estate) and how tragic it was (although one of hundreds, of course), since he could have been on Olympic. Thank you to anyone for posting possible answers!
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Hallo, Patrick. The 'last residence' information varies depending on which list you consult. The BoT passenger list shows Wheeler's last permanent residence simply as 'England'. The Senate list has his European address as 'Mr Vanderbilt's servant', implying that he was constantly on the move. In the registry of deaths his 'last abode' (probably a hotel) is shown as 'Paris', with the Bath address in brackets. Presumably that was the address of his parents and it might well have been the last place at which he was permanently resident for any length of time.
.
 
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Jeffrey Beaudry

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I know that this post is 14 days late, but is there a reason why beds on ships go fore-to-aft rather than port-to-starboard?
 
May 3, 2005
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To Lesley-

You being a Psychology Student, I'm just curious to know if you find any similarities between the factual Captain Stanley Lord of the S.S. Californian and the fictional Captain Francis S. Queeg of the U.S.S. Caine in Herman Wouk's "The Caine Mutiny" ?

To Jeffrey-
That's an interesting question. Could it be that since beds are longer fore-to-aft and so is the ship also.....and they conform to that configuration, space requirements, etc. ?
However if they were port-to-starboard you might be less likely to get tossed out of bed when the ship was rolling. :)
Same thing on the old Pullman on railway cars ?

"The best I've seen ma'am....hardly any rats !"
 
May 3, 2005
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Lesley-

A footnote on the Shakespeare-Psychology angle.: I had enough trouble keeping up with the characters and plot than to psycho-analyze the characters, in particular Falstaff. :)

Jeffrey-
On second thought: If the beds were port-to-starboard you might get tossed out of bed if the ship was pitching up and down ?
 
Dec 6, 2000
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Hello Jeffrey,

With Robert, I think it was probably something to do with being more comforable subject to the ship's movement. - Also all of the baths were fore-to-aft.

However, quite a number of the 3rd Class berths and many of the crew berths were port-to-starboard.
 
Nov 6, 2004
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Thank you very much, Bob, again.

I did not realize that there were that many official sources listing passengers' homes (and that they would be inconsistent with one another). Of course, with someone who moved around often like Mr. Wheeler, it is somewhat understandable.

This clears up the confusion I had about his and the Vanderbilts' connections to Titanic and each other. Much appreciated!!
 
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Jeffrey Beaudry

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Thanks everyone for the answers. I guess the rolling of the ship would add a few problems for people at night.
 
May 3, 2005
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The USN ships on which I served were all fairly small (500 ft. length, 10,000 tons displacement-an Escort Aircraft Carrier [CVE] and a Seaplane Tender[AV])- all had the bunks facing fore-to-aft. Also a MSTS troop ship [TAP] which was about the size of the Carpathia. However, I don't recall anyone ever getting tossed out of a bunk and we did run into some heavy weather at times.
 
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Lesley Jean-Baptiste

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To Robert:
I'm sorry I can't answer that question for you becasue I don't know the piece of work you speak about. >>fictional Captain Francis S. Queeg of the U.S.S. Caine in Herman Wouk's "The Caine Mutiny<<
That's the problem with living in the caribbean, limited resources.
Sorry.
 
May 3, 2005
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Lesley-

There may be a website on "The Caine Mutiny."
It's not exactly "Mutiny On The Bounty"... but... The story is set in WWII . In short, Captain Queeg is authoritarian, maltreats the officers and crew and tries to cover up his mistakes and cowardice. He panics during a typhoon and the next in command (The Executive Officer) relieves him and is charged with mutiny. During the cross-examination in the court martial , Captain Queeg cracks under pressure, babbles on and on incoherently , and the officers are acquitted. Humphrey Bogart got an "Oscar" for the role of Lieutenant Commander Philip Francis Queeg , Captain of the Destroyer-Mine Sweeper USS Caine and Van Johnson played the role of Lieutenant Steven Maryk, the Executive Officer. The original story, which covers a lot more ground than the movie, was written by Herman Wouk and the movie came out about ca. 1954.

"The best I've seen ma'am....hardly any rats."
Robert
 
May 3, 2005
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Lesley-

Just another footnote on "The Caine Mutiny." The title comes from the remark by the Navy's trial defense lawyer , Lieutenant Barney Greenwald, who was played by Jose' Ferrer. (He is charged with defending the "mutineers.") He tosses champagne in the face of Lieutenant Thomas Keefer, played by Fred Mc Murray and probably the other "villain" in the movie...he goaded Lt. Maryk into finally relieving the Captain.... Greenwald, who has had a bit too much to drink, says to Keefer, "Here's to you, the real author of The Caine Mutiny !" and then tosses champagne in his face.

So much for the trivia and back to ANTR.

Regards,
Robert