The search for Erebus and Terror


Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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See my post on titanic-titanic.

According to a source of uncertain reliability, the Parks Canada search was abandoned before it started. A private search will be made, but winter is coming, so nothing much is likely this year.
 
Those ships do not longer exist! As far as I am concerned, the Franklin expedition got trapped in an ice pack in the winter of 1847-1848. Why?Because the thought that the King William Island was a peninsula and went further to the north, directly towards an ice pack. The Erebus was eventually abandoned and crushed by the ice, while the Terror was used by inuits as a food storage. Since these ships were made of wood it is impossible that they had survived!
 
J

Jeff Brebner

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Depends on the water conditions. Look how long the Vasa survived, and she's pretty wooden.
 

Grant Carman

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Jun 19, 2006
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Even sea water in the north is extremely cold, and tends to last dozens, if not hundreds of years. THere are many old whaling stations in the artic that are still in excellent condition.
It is possible that if either of them sunk, that there would be remains.

The warmer the water, the faster the woodworms do their stuff.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Since these ships were made of wood it is impossible that they had survived!<<

Actually, it's quite possible. Toredo shipworms don't like the arctic and extreme cold has preservative qualities all it's own. Whether or not the wrecks have probably survived is another matter, but it's not impossible.
 
I am sorry, but I think that my statement has been misunderstood, I only wanted to make clear that because of these ships wood constructions they could not whistand the huge pressure of ice once they had been trapped.My mistake, I should have been more specific.

However, I don't think that the temperature is the only factor to be taken into account, what about humidity? Wood structures in the dessert of Arizona can last for centuries despite the extreme heat.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>what about humidity? <<

Errrrr...in an underwater environment, I suspect that humidity is a moot point.

Regarding the "Pressure" of ice, it's quite possible that these vessels were crushed. If that's the case, I doubt that much of anything would be found other then splinters. However, if the damage was only just enough to let the water in, there may well be a largely intact wreck to find.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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From The CBC:

Arctic survey bid hits snag over Franklin ships
quote:

An Alberta archeological firm's proposal to test survey equipment in an Arctic waterway has hit a roadblock over concerns about the long-lost ships of Sir John Franklin.

ProCom Marine Survey and Archeology had asked the Nunavut Impact Review Board to approve its proposal to conduct work in Larsen Sound, 195 kilometres northwest of Taloyoak in western Nunavut.
More at http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2010/02/23/arctic-survey-nirb.html
 

Simon Koncz

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Oct 10, 2010
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Both ships were bomb vessels, massively strong even before modifications prior to the expedition. Thats why they were chosen.
I suspect what sunk them was the bloody great doorways the local Inuit cut into the sides of the ships, from their own oral evidence.
They are still there all right, and more or less intact still, I would bet.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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From The Montreal Gazette:

Search for ill-fated, historic Franklin expedition could continue this summer
quote:

Parks Canada is quietly organizing a third season of searching this summer for the lost ships of Sir John Franklin – the 19th-century British explorer whose ill-fated expedition to the Canadian Arctic in the 1840s ended with the sinking of the ice-trapped HMS Terror and HMS Erebus, as well as the deaths of Franklin and all 128 men under his command.
More at http://www.montrealgazette.com/technology/Search+fated+historic+Franklin+expedition+could+continue+this+summer/4970054/story.html
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Jul 9, 2000
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Jul 9, 2000
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From WPXI:

The Unsolved Mystery Of 'Ghost Ships'
quote:

(CNN) -- It's been described as one of the greatest Victorian gothic horror stories of all time. Two ships with 129 men on board and fitted with the latest technology, vanish with barely a trace left behind. One hundred and sixty years of searching -- one attempt as recent as last month -- have failed to find "HMS Erebus" and her sister ship, the somewhat appropriately named "HMS Terror" -- the two vessels lost in the Arctic.
More at http://www.wpxi.com/nationalnews/29240281/detail.html
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Jul 9, 2000
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From CTV News:

W5: Search for HMS Investigator reveals secrets from the past
quote:

As I soared through the sky, in the back of pilot Jake Kaufman's helicopter, trailing a herd of wild muskox I thought to myself, "Well, I'll never do this again." Not that it wasn't fun. It was exhilarating, but even though the scenery and wildlife are breathtaking, it's unlikely I'll ever return to Mercy Bay on Banks Island, North West Territories. It's simply too remote.
More at http://m.ctv.ca/topstories/20111021/w5-hms-investigator-reveals-secrets-from-past-111021.html