The three Caldwells

Arne Mjåland

Member
Oct 21, 2001
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There is a thread here in ET about Albert Caldwell, which ended April 23 2001. It started 17 January same year. As you see there is lots of information about the Caldwells, much of it comes from a relative, Charles Caldwell. He is perhaps still among us. There are among other things questions about Caldwell books.
The owner of the house 305 Grant Road in Bloomington ILL, which Mrs Caldwell Merchele owned at the time of her death sent me a copy of a 10 pages book. It is called WOMEN OF THE TITANIC DISASTER by Mrs A.F. Caldwell. A.W. Themanson Publishing Co, St Joseph, MO. Have any of you read that book? It is about her experiences in the lifeboat and on the Carpahtia.
The owner of the house in 2002 told me: Mrs. Merchele built the house in 1955 and moved there after Mr Merchele died. Mrs Merchele had built the house to her specifications. The owner of the house also sent me a report by Mrs Merchele that first appeared in the "ALFI" news , an internal newspaper for State Farm employers.
The unidentified newspaper obituary January 15 1965 which is in ET about Mrs Merchele is from "Pantograph", Bloomington.
 
Jun 4, 2004
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Although I have not participated in ET discussions for some time, I came across your posting about my grandparents which brought back a lot of memories. Apparently from pictures, movies and vague recollections, I spent a lot of time at my grandmother's house on Grant Rd. I sent a number of images of the Caldwell's first home in Bloomington (c1925) to the State Farm Insurance archivist who provided me a copy of the booklet my grandmother wrote primarily about her activities on the Carpathia. I sent a .pdf copy to ET a few years ago for their files. Although I have been unable to locate a copy of the booklet, I did manage to purchase on EBay a copy of Elbert Hubbard's "Titanic" inscribed by his son to my grandfather. As you probably know Elbert Hubbard died on the Lusitania, the ship on which my grandparents may have originally booked passage back to the US. The Hubbard volume was probably from my uncle's collection. Let me know if you have any questions I might be able to answer. Although I sent you an email containing this posting, I decided to renew my membership in ET.
 

Pat Cook

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Apr 27, 2000
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Hi Charles,

Tickled to 'see' you back here again! Hope you'll stick around - we can always use your insight into the Caldwell story.

Best regards,
Cook
 

Arne Mjåland

Member
Oct 21, 2001
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Hallo Charles. I had hoped you would join the massage board after my posting, and I am glad you did. Obviously we will be able to exchange some information about the Caldwells later.
As earley as in 1959 Albert F Caldwell was facinated about the possibility of getting back the gold worth $100 he had with him on the Titanic. He had bought it in Siam. Here is from a Ricmond newspaper article July 7 1985: That year(1959) Caldwell attended a meeting in a Richmond brewery. The speaker there was Dwight H "Rainy" Day, a retired U.S. navy admiral. Day was project manager of Reynolds Metal Co experimental submarine.
After Day told Caldwell about the sub, Caldwell said something to this effect. "Admiral. I am giving you a direct order. When you find the Titanic, I want you to find the $100 worth of gold. It is in the bottom of my trunk in the bottom of the Titanic at the bottom of the ocean".