The Titanic Site Itself


Status
Not open for further replies.
Jun 12, 2004
2,131
13
233
Actually, the ultimate Titanic location to visit is the wreck site itself. It would stir the imagination, as well as touch the emotions, and be educational as well. I heard something about a very expensive submersible tour to the site. If that ever becomes a reality, I would love to make the 100th anniversary, which is coming up in 8 years.
 
C

Christina Rindt

Guest
Hello Mark
Interestingly, this has been discussed previously on ETMB and sure you will be directed to the thread. However, there is a dive in 2005 if you're really interested. See www.titanic.mem@bt.connect.com or [email protected].
You're right, it is expensive (to me anyway). Have a lookee...
Christina
 
Jun 12, 2004
2,131
13
233
Thanks for the links, Christina. I'll take a look. Before posting, I had looked through the categories and didn't see anything on this, so I decided to post. The site is so vast that you won't find everything, hehe.

As for the dive, I don't think I will be able to make that one. There's something about the 100-year anniversary that somehow makes seeing the wreck a special event. Maybe by then I'll have the $30,000 (?) that it takes to go.

Again thanks and peace.

--Mark
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,649
835
563
Easley South Carolina
I don't know if you'd really see that much. The only window to look out of on the submersibles capable of going down that far are barely a couple of inches wide at the narrowest point and a good six inches thick. It's also darker then the inside of a coal sack with a blindfold on, with the only illumination being from whatever lights are brought along for the ride.

Still, of all the Titanic sites to go to, I think the Titanic herself would be tough to beat.
 
C

Christina Rindt

Guest
Hi Mark
Have a look at General Titanica> Centenary 2012 thread. Also, Titanic 2012 and important 2012 anniversaries. This will give some idea I think.
Have a go anyway.
Christina
 
Jun 12, 2004
2,131
13
233
Christina,

I did read through it. That's what inspired me to leave the initial post above, hehe. Of course, I didn't see anything in reference to the wreck site. Perhaps those posts were older and sealed up. In any case, I obviously missed some, as you've presented them to me. I thank you again.
*He humbly bows to the Lady*

As for doing the cenetary anniversary, I fully plan to participate, believe me. I think it will be fun and educational.
happy.gif


Take care
 
C

Christina Rindt

Guest
Mark
Thank you kindly. I think the anniversary will be fun to participate in but mostly profound respect for the lives lost and the aftermath with those who survived. It should be a well marked reminder.
Christina
 
Jun 12, 2004
2,131
13
233
>>I don't know if you'd really see that much.<<

Still, it would be exciting just knowing that the Titanic would be just outside. That's enough to make the trip worth while, isn't it? ;)
 
C

Christina Rindt

Guest
Mark
I hope you've noticed that there is an advertisement atop the postings here on a dive next year - phew! The price I'm sure is justifable but way beyond me, but the itinerary is very interesting.
Oh, and btw, I am very comfortable with your points of view and a good grasp on the foibles into what makes a human 'be'. Thank you.
Christina.
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,649
835
563
Easley South Carolina
>>Still, it would be exciting just knowing that the Titanic would be just outside. That's enough to make the trip worth while, isn't it? ;)<<

It just might. Just hope you don't have claustrophobia. In a two metre wide titanium sphere at 12,500 feet, there's no way out. (Well, there is, but you don't want to use it. You really don't.)
wink.gif
 
Jul 12, 2003
500
4
183
And, I bet, it is VERY dark...so mix that with claustrophobia...not a happy thought for me. then, you'd be in major trouble if you need to make a sandbox run.
 
Jun 12, 2004
2,131
13
233
>>Mark
I hope you've noticed that there is an advertisement atop the postings here on a dive next year - phew! The price I'm sure is justifiable but way beyond me, but the itinerary is very interesting.<<

Yeah, I saw it, Christina. Thanks. I'm almost certain that I won't be able to afford next year. Unlike Cameron, I am not loaded with money, ;P hehe. I thank you again for keeping me apprised.

I also appreciate your support regarding my POV on human nature. Several people throughout my life have adamantly expressed either a lack of understanding or a total disagreement with some of my views. What I won't tolerate, though, is condescension from anyone, and, unfortunately, I've been confronted with that form of ignorance before, too. But, as an educated individual, I show patience, as I realize that not everyone will see things the same as anyone else and that certain retaliatory reactions are bound to just create petty and unnecessary arguments which can best be avoided at all costs. As for grasping the 'foibles of human nature,' I grasp very well the ideas which comprise my beliefs and my views. The question is: Do others? ;) Thanks again for your support, Christina. Maybe we can talk more about the subject sometime, if you'd like.

>>Just hope you don't have claustrophobia. In a two metre wide titanium sphere at 12,500 feet, there's no way out. (Well, there is, but you don't want to use it. You really don't.)<<

No, I don't, and the tight space wouldn't bother me. As said, it would be exciting.

One of these days, though, a special underwater suit will be devised so that individuals will be able to actually step through the door onto the deck (considering the deck is strong enough at the time to support their weight). I am writing a short story now revolving around that very concept, with a sunken liner sitting as far down as the Titanic (the wreck was originally the Titanic, but creating a fictional liner would give me more leeway, as long as I observe the laws of Physics and the progression of technological development).

DARK indeed! That adds to the mystique. ;)

I would definitely do my 'business' before going down, unless the scientists who've developed the technology have devised a rectification for in-sub calls-of-nature.
 
Jun 11, 2000
2,524
25
313
This is the human desire for an 'experience' versus the what actually yields more knowledge. Some people might want to go to Mars - in terms of science, it's much better to send instruments at present, and I think, will be for a long time yet. I personally doubt that human observation through a tiny window, 9" thick, two and a half miles down in the Atlantic, yields anything like as good knowledge as robotic instruments viewed safely from the surface via video. I think both romanticism and cash need to be removed from such propositions.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads