The Titanic

Kyle Stewart

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Jul 18, 2002
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I think that the Titanic showed the Gilded Age pretty well and show how people ranked at that time. Plus at that time nothing at that magintude was ever felt by human scale. At the time that Titanic sank it was an unthinkable and nobody thought it would sink. Now you cannot call something unsinkable anymore after the Titanic went down. Also it didnt have the right stuff things to make it safe. Do you agree with me? If so explain your answer and why.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
I don't beleive "unthinkable" is so much the operative word as complacancy is. By this time, the North Atlantic mail boats had operated with few deaths for almost 40 years. As far as anyone then was concerned why shouldn't the trend continue? I don't think anyone at the time thought a ship was unsinkable, although the phrase "Practically unsinkable" was used by The Shipbuilder and the rest of the media ran away with it.

As to having the right stuff to make her safe, well of courseshe did. Unfortunately, nobody though of ripping open six and possibly seven sections to the sea with and an iceberg. No ship could have survived that then, nad I don't know of any passenger ship which could survive that today. Most such are disigned o float with two sections flooded. The Olympic class liners were designed to float with up to four flooded, and they had considerable margin for growth.

Short of a major warship, try to find that today.

Also, as superlative as the Olympics were, there were even larger ships being built, starting with the Imperator.
 
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Marykate Viola

Guest
The only things that the crew didn't have that would make the Titanic safer were: binoculars, enough lifeboats, and common sense. But I do think that the Titanic did have one safety features that contibuted to it being particuarly safe, the watertight bulkheads. It was only unfornante that water went over five bulkheads when it hit the iceberg.
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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Kyle, you are falling for the old legend that makes Titanic out to be something quite astonishing and exceptional. In fact, she was nothing of the sort. She was actually one of a group of seven large liners built in the space of a few years and she wasn't even the biggest. By the time she was in service, Olympic was already old-hat. The press was turning to even larger ships that were already under construction, especially three giant German liners. Had Titanic not sunk, she would have been just another ship.

The big seven were. Olympic, Titanic, Britannic, Aquitania, Imperator, Vaterland and Bismarck.
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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Marykate, the binoculars would have made no difference. That's been argued to death elsewhere on this forum. Both professional and amateur seamen agree on it.

As to the bulkheads, ships had been fitted with watertight bulkheads and watertight doors for many years. Titanic had much the same features as the rest. One of her good points was that she was designed in such as way that when she flooded she did not list very much. Some later ships have done much worse and rolled over before sinking.
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
I know i'm posting 6 years after LOL
My opinion is that ,When Titanic was built men thought they coqured mother nature once and for all,but when Titanic sank no other ship was classed unsinkable and saftey was up graded.It proofs that men got the message from mother nature that fateful night.You can say that the Titanic had influence what safty we have today!
If Titanic never hit an iceberg and sunk, i wounder if we would have the saftey prosedures and saftey equitment we have today?
 
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Trevor Rommelley

Guest
Wasn't the Nazi battlecruiser Bismarck also called "unsinkable"? Then, it would be a matter of national pride and hubris!
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
Mab sir.After Titanic,it was the Media that class the ships unsinkable not there owners? If true that means ships were not classed as unsinkable after Titanic sunk.
Was not the Olympic class liner's class as unsinkable by the the media and not there owners?
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
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Dec 29, 2000
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Hello, Aly---

I only know what I read in the papers; I don't know (and don't much care) whether the "unsinkable" terminology originated with H&W, White Star or the media. Wherever it originated, it was clearly still being used after Titanic's sinking, as demonstrated by the examples given in the thread I linked to.

For more on the subject, see George Behe's "How the Titanic Became Unsinkable."
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
Mab sir. You spoke to me nicely and you call me Aly
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>>Wherever it originated, it was clearly still being used after Titanic's sinking, as demonstrated by the examples given <<

Ok Mab sir.I was just woundering if it was possible.
 

Paul Lee

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Aug 11, 2003
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From the Liverpool Weekly Mercury 4th May 1912

"A Belfast shipyard expert states that in the two White Star boats now building at Queen's Island the plans are undergoing considerable
alteration as regards the arrangement of bulkheads ... other radical improvements towards making these vessels unsinkable are under consideration."

Seems that even after the Titanic, they thought they could build an unsinkable ship!

Paul
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http://www.paullee.com/titanic/