The use of saltwater on board


Nov 14, 2005
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I understand where your coming from. Last week I finally got into the dentist to get a check up and get my teeth cleaned. That was messed up here because of the virus thing. But the thought popped into my mind I've had for decades. Why didn't God, nature or fate (whatever one subscribes to) make us with teeth that were made of diamonds or like those sea creatures in Indonesia that have metal teeth?
 
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Arun Vajpey

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I understand where your coming from. Last week I finally got into the dentist to get a check up and get my teeth cleaned. That was messed up here because of the virus thing. But the thought popped into my mind I've had for decades. Why didn't God, nature or fate (whatever one subscribes to) make us with teeth that were made of diamonds or like those sea creatures in Indonesia that have metal teeth?
Speaking of teeth, I am almost 65 years old and don't have a single filling. All my teeth are fine. The last time I want to the dentist was in 1991 and that was after some 23 years; he asked me what I was doing there. I needed no treatment and have not been since.
 
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Nov 14, 2005
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Speaking of teeth, I am almost 65 years old and don't have a single filling. All my teeth are fine. The last time I want to the dentist was in 1991 and that was after some 23 years; he asked me what I was doing there. I needed no treatment and have not been since.
Your a lucky man then. I have to go back next week to get a broken filling fixed. A funny as in odd story keeping in the nautical vein of this site. Well at least a little bit. My dad told me when he was assigned to a gun crew on a Liberty ship during WW2 they march the whole navy crew to the dentist and made them get their wisdom teeth pulled...all 4 at once. The Navy in their wisdom (no pun intended) figured it was preventive medicine or something since they didn't have the means to take care of it on those ships or so the story goes. I guess they did that back then. They never did anything like that when I was in.
 
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Tim Gerard

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With your teeth thing, I often wondered when I was younger why humans only have two sets of teeth our entire lives and not unlimited sets of teeth like sharks. It would be easier, a tooth gives us any kind of problem, just get rid of it and a new one grows in a few days later.
 
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Nov 14, 2005
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With your teeth thing, I often wondered when I was younger why humans only have two sets of teeth our entire lives and not unlimited sets of teeth like sharks. It would be easier, a tooth gives us any kind of problem, just get rid of it and a new one grows in a few days later.
Thats a good point. I had thought of that before too. On a lighter note I was watching a show the other day and they were talking about this. Seems the going rate for the tooth fairy is up to $5 now. WTH? Damn inflation.
 
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Mark Baber

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This is just a gentle nudge to get this back to something that's at least remotely on topic.

;-)
 
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Tim Gerard

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My bad Mark, thanks for the nudge.

Having to do with the thread, what was Titanic's freshwater generating capacity anyway? I imagine the largest single use of that freshwater would've been feedwater for the boilers, though based on what I know of present day shipboard steam engines, for the most part once they get the steam cycle up and running and generate and store some reserve feedwater, they wouldn't need to keep constantly adding water to the system. After feedwater and I imagine cooking, dishwashing, and whatever on board laundry, how much freshwater would've even been left for things like potable/drinking and bathing? Or would they have intended on using seawater during colder months as much as possible to reduce the chance of it freezing in piping and storage tanks? I know sometime during the night shortly before hitting the iceberg, either Murdoch, Lightoller, or Thomas Andrews (I can't remember which between these 3) was worried about freshwater tanks freezing.
 
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My bad Mark, thanks for the nudge.

Having to do with the thread, what was Titanic's freshwater generating capacity anyway? I imagine the largest single use of that freshwater would've been feedwater for the boilers, though based on what I know of present day shipboard steam engines, for the most part once they get the steam cycle up and running and generate and store some reserve feedwater, they wouldn't need to keep constantly adding water to the system. After feedwater and I imagine cooking, dishwashing, and whatever on board laundry, how much freshwater would've even been left for things like potable/drinking and bathing? Or would they have intended on using seawater during colder months as much as possible to reduce the chance of it freezing in piping and storage tanks? I know sometime during the night shortly before hitting the iceberg, either Murdoch, Lightoller, or Thomas Andrews (I can't remember which between these 3) was worried about freshwater tanks freezing.
From Mr. Halpern's article (link below). I don't think he will mind me copying and pasting the relevant part. But I would recomend anyone to read the whole thing.
"Despite being a close loop system, there were always some loss of feedwater supply. Additional fresh water for the boilers was carried in fresh-water tanks in the ship’s double bottom. These were located under the reciprocating and turbine engine rooms and had a total capacity of just over 1000 tons. Distilled fresh water could also be re-supplied from three evaporators located near the aft watertight bulkhead on the starboard side of the turbine engine room. If needed, each evaporator could produce 60 tons of fresh water every 24 hours."
Using that figure of 60 tons per day for each evaporator that would equal to about 15,000 gals a day per evap. Thats a rough calculation using that ditty we learned as kids. "A pints a pound the world around" As long as everything was working right I don't think fresh water would be problem. As I stated in other threads I was on a ship that had fresh water problems. The boilers had priority being a warship and all. Long story short...we were a stinky boat for about a week once...no showers.
 
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Arun Vajpey

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Now practical and effective are the portable seawater desaliner plants. I believe large ferries and some cargo ships have them?
 

Tim Gerard

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I thought I was onto something with figuring out the Titanic's freshwater generating capacity, subtracting its consumption, and assuming they'd use saltwater for everything else, but it was a lot more complicated to try to figure all that out than I anticipated.
 
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I could see where it would be very difficult to get exact figures if thats what you are/were going for. The variables would be changing constantly. Not that it was probably a factor with Titanic being new and all but with older ships stuff would start leaking over time. But your post brought up another question I was wondering about. Just how good the quality of water did Titanic make. I could tell you funny story about ultra pure/laboratory grade condensate but it would be off topic. I'll just say...DON'T DRINK IT!
 
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Now practical and effective are the portable seawater desaliner plants. I believe large ferries and some cargo ships have them?
 
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Dec 27, 2017
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Isle of Man
I could see where it would be very difficult to get exact figures if thats what you are/were going for. The variables would be changing constantly. Not that it was probably a factor with Titanic being new and all but with older ships stuff would start leaking over time. But your post brought up another question I was wondering about. Just how good the quality of water did Titanic make. I could tell you funny story about ultra pure/laboratory grade condensate but it would be off topic. I'll just say...DON'T DRINK IT!
My understanding is that the water that was distilled was used purely for boiler top-up. All drinking water came from the fresh water tanks.
 
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I went and read some other threads on this but came away with more questions than answers. I thought maybe they had a valving arrangement to divert some condensate to the potable water tanks. But you could be right. Maybe than weren't allowed to mix the water from different sysytems. Personally from what I've read of the early 1900's I would trust condensate more than portside water.
 
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I didn't know that. From the valves in the picture it looks like that's the case. Thanks.
5d5e05522500004e00849f36.jpeg
 
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