Theory Iceberg Collision Video


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Aaron_2016

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After reading many possible theories I decided to edit this video to show how the collision may have occurred. Is this scenario possible?




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Arun Vajpey

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Personally, I do not believe in the 2-iceberg theory. There were a lot of bergs and field ice of course but IMO there was just one big iceberg that was involved in the Titanic disaster.
 

Jim Currie

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A pile of old, unmitigated rubbish of the first order. Fine for anyone who hasn't the faintest idea what it's like to be on the bridge of a ship or on lookout on a dark, moonless, calm night. Most definitely not recommended as a training film for bridge officers.:rolleyes:
 
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Aaron_2016

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No call for insults. I just showed what happened based on survivor testimony. I'm sure many people have disagreed with your opinions. So you see the field ice ahead. What do you do? Change course and steer south of it. It's not rocket science. The survivors described two different icebergs and saw both of them at day break near the Carpathia. They saw the Titanic turn right and felt the ship grounding over the ice. Everything in the video is possible and was described by the survivors. The video just shows that scenario.

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Jim Currie

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Not insulting you Aaro. Nor did I ever intend to. Not even your additions. It was just the video itself. if a video can be insulted.

As for many people, I'm sure you are right but as I pointed out , the people in question would not include any seaman who had found himself in the same circumstances.
Believe me, when you are on lookout up in the nest or right forward in the bow on a dark, moonless night, it is hard to see your own hand in front of you. If you see anything at all, it has to be by star light and very, very close to you or so tall and close to you that it blocks out the stars on the horizon. Then it looks black.
Passengers on the passenger decks can only see something that picks up the reflected accommodation lights. This means that the something has to be very close to the ships side.
If you want to know exactly what it was like that night, you can do no better than read the evidence of Captain Rostron of the Carpathia, He only just managed to swerve at the last moment to avoid an iceberg. He also saw one by chance as it reflected the light of a shooting star.

Who saw the ship turn right?

No Aaron, you don't steer south to avoid ice at or near the time you might just meet it... you steer south in good time. Nor do you alter course unless you are pretty sure you know where you are. If Captain Smith had wished to steer south to clear the ice, he would, like any other prudent Master, have done as soon as he received 7-30 pm fix position from Boxhall which was around 9-30 pm. In fact, even 9-30 pm was too late since he had the same information we do...that they expected to be up at the ice between 9-30 pm and 11 pm.

You are right, it's not rocket science, simply the nautical version.
 
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Arun Vajpey

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I think the second iceberg was on the grassy knoll.
I think that is unlikely. Dallas was well southwest of Titanic's position at the time and an iceberg on the grassy knoll would have been significantly to the port side of the ship. Despite forgetting his spectacles in his cabin, Murdoch would then have given a hard-a-port order and the Titanic would have missed the berg by at least 6 points.
Furthermore, it there had been an iceberg on the grassy knoll that night, it would have turned into snow by November 1963 and someone would have noticed.
 
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Aaron_2016

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I think the second iceberg was on the grassy knoll.

The lifeboats rowed passed two icebergs between them and the Carpathia. They were photographed by those on the ship. Witnesses described them. e.g.


"....two icebergs standing guard over the dead....This berg to starboard, the officers thought, was the very monster that had hit the Titanic. It's side appeared to be split off as if cleaved by some instrument of mighty power and sharpness."

Frank Osman
Q - Did you see this iceberg?
A - Not until the morning.
Q - Are you sure it was the one?
A - Yes, sir; you could see it was the one, sir.
Q - What shape was it?
A - It was round, and then had one big point sticking up on one side of it.
Q - What was its color?
A - It was apparently dark, like dirty ice.
Q - How far away from it were you when you saw it?
A - About 100 yards.
Q - How did you know that was the one you struck?
A - We could see it was the biggest berg there, and the other ones would not have done so much damage, I think.
Q - Was there any mark on the side, as if it had collided with something?
A - It looked as if there was a piece broken off after she struck, and the ice fell on board. I went and picked up a piece of ice and took it down below in my sleeping room.


Charles Stengel
"There was one of them, particularly, that I noticed, a very large one, which looked something like the Rock of Gibraltar; it was high at one point, and another point came up at the other end, about the same shape as the rock of Gibraltar."


Photo taken aboard the Carpathia of possibly the same two icebergs that were seen by the survivors. The one on the right could be the one described as the "rock of Gibraltar" which was also described by Scarrott as he observed it passing the ship.


icefield1.jpg

icefield2.JPG

icefield03.JPG
 
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Aaron_2016

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Aaron

The iceberg in the picture above has two points. The one seen by Scarrott was like Gibraltar as seen from Europa Point. As seen from Europa point, The Rock does not look like anything in these pictures.


The survivors rowed passed two icebergs between them and the Carpathia. Charles Stengel said - "There was one of them, particularly, that I noticed, a very large one, which looked something like the Rock of Gibraltar; it was high at one point, and another point came up at the other end, about the same shape as the rock of Gibraltar."


The iceberg on the right has two points as described by Stengel which he believed looked similar to the rock of Gibraltar with one point higher than the other. I think the iceberg on the right could be the same one he described. The right point is possibly much higher than the left, assuming the right point is actually at the back and further away and the left point is in the foreground closer to the camera.


icebergshape.PNG


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Arun Vajpey

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PRR5406, that photograph proves nothing. The Mersey Commission were certain that ONE icerberg, acting alone and without accomplices, struck and sank the Titanic.

But there might be an explanation why the lookouts did not see it on time. The Texas School Book Depository was in the way!
 
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Mar 22, 2003
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If anyone posts a photo taken from Carpathia, then please post only untouched ones. There were icebergs imbedded in the pack ice off to the west of were Carpathia was. This can be seen in the 1st photo of the three photos posted above. In my opinion, it rules those berg out.
 
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Rennette Marston

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I think that is unlikely. Dallas was well southwest of Titanic's position at the time and an iceberg on the grassy knoll would have been significantly to the port side of the ship. Despite forgetting his spectacles in his cabin, Murdoch would then have given a hard-a-port order and the Titanic would have missed the berg by at least 6 points.
Furthermore, it there had been an iceberg on the grassy knoll that night, it would have turned into snow by November 1963 and someone would have noticed.

He was obviously joking. Of course, no ice was in Dallas!
 
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PRR5406

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You completely overlook the theory that the reporter Dorothy Kilgallen was murdered after jack Ruby told her how J. Edgar Hoover gave Oswald and Evingrude outboard to steer the second iceberg into "Titanic's" path.

Look folks, this is humor among a few colleagues who are prodding each other. Don't take it seriously; just enjoy.
Besides, Dallas is nowhere near the North Atlantic.
 
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Rennette Marston

Rennette Marston
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You completely overlook the theory that the reporter Dorothy Kilgallen was murdered after jack Ruby told her how J. Edgar Hoover gave Oswald and Evingrude outboard to steer the second iceberg into "Titanic's" path.

Look folks, this is humor among a few colleagues who are prodding each other. Don't take it seriously; just enjoy.
Besides, Dallas is nowhere near the North Atlantic.
LMAO.
 
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Rennette Marston

Rennette Marston
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You completely overlook the theory that the reporter Dorothy Kilgallen was murdered after jack Ruby told her how J. Edgar Hoover gave Oswald and Evingrude outboard to steer the second iceberg into "Titanic's" path.

Look folks, this is humor among a few colleagues who are prodding each other. Don't take it seriously; just enjoy.
Besides, Dallas is nowhere near the North Atlantic.

There's also a theory that the JFK assassination was an elaborate prank (i.e. a hoax). As well as another theory that says the Titanic never sank and she became the Imperator and the wreck is a prop filmed in a darkroom at Studio 54.
 

PRR5406

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"There's also a theory that the JFK assassination was an elaborate prank (i.e. a hoax). As well as another theory that says the Titanic never sank and she became the Imperator and the wreck is a prop filmed in a darkroom at Studio 54."

Oooh! I never caught that one. This was no doubt executed by the guys who faked the Apollo landings, the covid virus, the Viet Nam debacle, and Sponge Bob Squarepants. Now I'm off to the library. Oh heck, don't need no books when we have the internet and Trump's tweets!
Solid stuff!
 
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I think the second iceberg was on the grassy knoll.
Just an aside on the "grassy knoll".
A "knoll" is defined as "a small hill or mound".
If this is in reference to the JFK assassination this is a common misconception.
There are no "hills or mounds" on Dealey Plaza.
The story is that somehow what a news announcer had said as a "mall" got garbled into "knoll."
Just a bit of off topic little known trivia.
What this really is is "a grassy slope".....and I suppose you could call Dealey Plaza as a whole as "a grassy mall".
 
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Not insulting you Aaro. Nor did I ever intend to. Not even your additions. It was just the video itself. if a video can be insulted.

As for many people, I'm sure you are right but as I pointed out , the people in question would not include any seaman who had found himself in the same circumstances.
Believe me, when you are on lookout up in the nest or right forward in the bow on a dark, moonless night, it is hard to see your own hand in front of you. If you see anything at all, it has to be by star light and very, very close to you or so tall and close to you that it blocks out the stars on the horizon. Then it looks black.
Passengers on the passenger decks can only see something that picks up the reflected accommodation lights. This means that the something has to be very close to the ships side.
If you want to know exactly what it was like that night, you can do no better than read the evidence of Captain Rostron of the Carpathia, He only just managed to swerve at the last moment to avoid an iceberg. He also saw one by chance as it reflected the light of a shooting star.

Who saw the ship turn right?

No Aaron, you don't steer south to avoid ice at or near the time you might just meet it... you steer south in good time. Nor do you alter course unless you are pretty sure you know where you are. If Captain Smith had wished to steer south to clear the ice, he would, like any other prudent Master, have done as soon as he received 7-30 pm fix position from Boxhall which was around 9-30 pm. In fact, even 9-30 pm was too late since he had the same information we do...that they expected to be up at the ice between 9-30 pm and 11 pm.

You are right, it's not rocket science, simply the nautical version.

Just an aside, Jim Currie-

I remember looking out on the ocean (calm night on the Pacific Ocean) from an outside deck passage way of the ship on which I was assigned to.
There was no moon and there was a heavy cloud overcast and no stars could be seen.
It was really, really, very, very dark.
How would it have been for the lookouts on the Titanic if those had been the conditions ?
 

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