This is the Titanic, right?

PRR5406

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Photography was still a fairly complex system of home laboratory chemistry in 1912. I wonder what caused Father Browne to expend so many plates on "Titanic" in particular? Either he was taken up in the hype, or it was a curiosity in his life, and he merely wanted a record for his own enjoyment.
 

John Jaeger

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Sep 11, 2015
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A thing of beauty, Martin. Wonderful.
If Titanic had only two screws, you wouldn't have had to worry, huh.
No way two screws can hurt you, only triples are dangerous.
 
May 3, 2005
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Photography was still a fairly complex system of home laboratory chemistry in 1912. I wonder what caused Father Browne to expend so many plates on "Titanic" in particular? Either he was taken up in the hype, or it was a curiosity in his life, and he merely wanted a record for his own enjoyment.
I think I can relate to Father Browne.
I was something of the same nature during my service in the U.S.Navy. I took a lot of Kodachromes for all those reasons.
Also the leading petty officer of our division was a fellow photography enthusiast (as well as a fellow ham radio operator.) He had constructed an enlarger from old camera parts and set up a darkroom in one of the storage compartments on the ship. We did a lot of developing, printing and enlarging of black and white film of ours and from other members of the crew. We hid the enlarger, trays and chemicals in a crate marked "Radar Spare Parts." I hope it's been so far in the past that we're safe from the statutes of limitations and the NCIS isn't going to come knocking at my/his front door !
So much for the sea stories ! LOL.

BTW Was Father Browne using a roll-film type camera or film plates for all of his photos ? I think I read somewhere that he had been given a gift of a Kodak Brownie (roll film camera) ? I have also read somewhere that in those days, you mailed your film to Kodak and they mailed the developed film and prints back to you. But I suppose the equipment and chemicals were available for "do it yourself" person such as Father Browne.
 
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May 3, 2005
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Photography was still a fairly complex system of home laboratory chemistry in 1912. I wonder what caused Father Browne to expend so many plates on "Titanic" in particular? Either he was taken up in the hype, or it was a curiosity in his life, and he merely wanted a record for his own enjoyment.
Just a little on the "fairly complex system". It was the same during our Navy days.
(1) You had a dim red "safe light" in your "dark room" to avoid exposing film.
(2) You took the film out of the camera and loaded it into a light-proof "developing tank."
(3) Your poured "developer" in the tank and swished around the tank for a few minutes.
(4) You poured out the developer. You could usually save it for a few rolls of film.
(5) You poured "short stop" in the tank to avoid over-developing the film.
(6) Empty this as before.
(7) May have poured in pure water at this point to clear off the chemicals. Not sure if we did this ?
(8) Pour in "fixer or hardener" to end the process.
(9) Empty this as before.
(10) Then you washed the film and hung it up to dry.

Then you could make "prints" (same size) or "enlargements" from these "negatives" using trays of the chemicals and procedure described above and special paper.
It was a "labor intensive" and "time consuming" process, to say the least, for the amateur photographer !

You could develop color film yourself. But it was an even more tedious and complex operation. We just mailed our Kodachromes to Kodak for processing.
 
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May 3, 2005
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Talking about names. Does anybody know if Titanic had "TITANIC" name engraved in her Stern like the bow did?
You can make this out if you look closely at the photo.
TITANIC
LIVERPOOL

There are some black specks or "dots" on the photo . That could be one on the top of the fourth funnel.On the other hand it looks a little like it could be the head of an alien ! LOL.
If it was the head of a person, on blowing up the photo, it looks as if that person would have had to have had a very long and very skinny neck.
My idea is that black "dot" and the others are just pin pricks in the emulsion of the negative that led in light that would cause such black "dots" on the print or enlargement. I am also making an assumption that the photo was made from a "negative" film. Any thing white shows up black and any thing black shows up as white in a photo made from a negative. The photo seems to very much more contrasty than photographs of that time. It's of the Titanic, all right, but I don't see how you could identify any of the individuals. Maybe in the original . Maybe the photographer was lucky and just took it at the instant when the stoker had climbed up the fourth stack and looked over as it was was reported ?
 
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Here's a Link to a HD Version:
Thanks Martin !


Yes ! ..... In your photo it does look like the head and shoulders of a person who has on some kind of a cap or hat.

You can also see the warning sign (on the stern railing, to the left of the flag mast).
It's too blurred in the photo to read.
But it read :
NOTICE
THIS VESSAL HAS
TRIPLE SCREWS
KEEP CLEAR OF
BLADES
 
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Sep 27, 2005
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Hi,

even though this is written Titanic on it (and on the website), I wanted a confirmation from experts (you guys) - this is the Titanic, right ?

I guess the the pic has been taken the day of its departure, it is true ? (since it may have been on the previous (small) travels it did before).

Thanks for the help,


Benjamin

http://www.abratis.de/ship/exterior/pic/stern2.jpg
 
Jun 18, 2007
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If there's an enclosed promenade, then it's the Titanic. I think that the prom is enclosed in that pic, but it's rather blurry, even enlarged, so I could be wrong. (I can't really see the name on the plates, to be honest).

If it is the Titanic, I've never seen that picture that big before. Rather unsettling, considering the stern's pretty prominent at that size. Ugh.
 
Feb 6, 2003
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That is Titanic anchored at Queenstown. The picture was taken by Father Brown while he was leaving the ship on one of the ferry boats between the ship and the harbor. The interesting thing about the picture is that it shows the man on top of the 4th funnel pretty well. Thanks to its enlargement. The man was considered by many to be a bad omen.
 
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Hey,

by father Brown, really ? I got an answer (from another titanic board) that Mr. White took the picture and that father Brown was on a lifeboat, right at the aft end of the port side (that I personally do not see), along with three other men ...


Benjamin
 

Mike Herbold

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Feb 13, 2001
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On page 73 of the book "The Last Days of the Titanic" by E.E.O'Donnell, which features the famous Father Browne photos:
"This photograph was taken from the tender America as she approached the port gangway by Mr. Whyte of Queenstown."
"Frank Browne is the centre figure of the three immediately forward of the four aft lifeboats left of centre."

For the life of me, my eyes are nowhere near powerful enough to make out Father Browne as he is pointed out here, but that's what it says in the book.
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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In Francis Browne's book, the three heads are easily visible, as are the ship's name and port of registry. Something, perhaps a head, is visible at the top of the fourth funnel. The photo appears to be from a scratched negative and is not of the best quality. Scanning didn't improve it.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Supposedly, the Jenny the Cat left the ship taking her kittens with her. Whether or not this is true is anyone's guess. Supposedly...so the legend has it...some of the sailors saw this and one was alleged to have remarked ominously "That cat knows something." Like Bob said, it's highly questionable whether or not this actually happened, but it makes a great story.