Thomas Andrews

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julia feldmann

Guest
To introduce myself, my name is Julia Feldmann and I come from Germany. For my A-levels I´m doing a project on Thomas Andrews.
Although I´ve read the Andrews biography by Shan F. Bullock and "Belfast´s Own" by Stephen Cameron I´m still looking for additional information on him or his family.
Any help would be great,

Julia
 
Apr 22, 2012
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Hello Julia,

Thomas Andrews Jr. was born on February 7, 1873, a son of the Right Hon. He was the nephew of Lord Pirrie, principal owner of Harland and Wolff (the builders of the Titanic.)

In 1884 Andrews entered the Royal Belfast Academical Institution, but at the age of 16 he left school and entered Harland and Wolff shipbuilders as a premium apprentice, gradually working his way up through various departments. He eventually became the managing director of H & W in charge of designing, and was familiar with every detail of the construction of the firm's ships. In 1901 Andrews became a member of the Institution of Naval Architects, and on June 24, 1908 he married Helen Reilly Barbour; two years later a daughter, Elizabeth, was born to the young couple and they lived at "Dunallon", Windsow Avenue, Belfast.

Thomas Andrews made a point of sailing with a team of mechanics on the maiden voyage of the Adriatic, Oceanic, and Olympic in order to observe their operation and recommend improvements to future vessels slated to be built by his firm. It was for this very reason that Andrews planned to sail on Titanic's maiden voyage to America, and the 38-year-old executive left his wife and family in Belfast while he accompanied the vessel first to Southampton and, later, out onto the vast expanse of the North Atlantic. In his final letter to Mrs. Andrews he expressed his satisfaction with the new vessel: "The Titanic is now about complete and will I think do the old Firm credit tomorrow when we sail."

Andrews died in the sinking. He was last saw standing in the first-class smoking rooom.

-B.W.
 
Dec 4, 2000
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If the stories about Andrews in the first class smoking lounge are true...the man seemed to "know" that Titanic would break apart. The lounge was quite near the center of the breakup, which suggests Andrews went there to see first-hand the way his creation would tear itself apart.

Or, he may have been there because he wasn't somewhere else. We'll never know for certain, but it's fun to speculate.

-- David G. Brown
 

Teri Lynn Milch

Senior Member
Apr 7, 2001
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Dear Julia,

You can find out the truth about Thomas Andrews's life in his book written by Bill Barnes entitled,"Thomas Andrews Voyage Into History, Titanic Secrets Revealed through the eyes of her Builder."

Teri
http://www.bruceismay.com
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
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Please stick to history and keep the fantasies out of it. There's enough twaddle written about Titanic already. A serious enquiry from a serious student deserves a serious reply.

Julia, the books you have read and the remarks by Brandon are about all the authentic information there is.
 

Teri Lynn Milch

Senior Member
Apr 7, 2001
1,053
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Julia,

Well I guess you'll have to decide for yourself what the truth is exactly. Some folks just don't get it, (reincarnation) is too bad.

Reincarnation is a controversial subject true enough, but if you have several people who can confirm your memories as they were, then who is to disbelieve you?

I respect anyone's belief not involving reincarnation, but you gotta admit, isn't my story more awakening? The sign of truth comes from within.

Maybe you should do your own research on reincarnation instead of hearing it from me or some other message board writer.

Any questions Julia, write me personally and we'll take it from there.

Good luck with your studies in school. Do well.

Teri
http://www.bruceismay.com
 

Phillip Gowan

Member
Apr 10, 2001
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Julia,
Steven Cameron has written a new biogaphy on Thomas Andrews that has yet to find a publisher. You might try to contact him thru the Ulster Titanic Society in Northern Ireland and see if he would respond. He's the authority.

Regards,
Phillip
 
J

julia feldmann

Guest
Thanks Phillip

If you don´t want to post this here,you can write to me personally.

Bye,
Julia
 

Sam Brannigan

Member
Feb 24, 2007
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It is suggested in "Shipbuilders to the world" by Hume, and elsewhere, that Andrews, had he lived, would have succeeded Lord Pirrie as head of Harland and Wolff after Pirries death.

Pirries financial affairs on his death were disastrous and a trust had to be set up to provide for Lady Pirrie, as almost nothing was left of his estate after debts and death duties were paid.

It would have been interesting to have seen how Andrews could have helped in avoiding the future downturn in the yards fortunes, or if he would have been allowed any role at all following the bad feelings his uncle left in his wake.

Regards

Sam
 
J

julia feldmann

Guest
Sam,
are there any further mentions of Thomas Andrews in this book. I never heard of "Shipbuilders to the world".

Thanks,
Julia
 

Sam Brannigan

Member
Feb 24, 2007
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The book was released to commemorate 125 years of Harland and Wolff in 1986. It is fantastic, and puts the story of the Olympic class liners in proper context with the rest of the shipyards history.

There's also a very interesting picture of Thomas Andrews as a sixteen year old apprentice with his workmates.

When you see this picture you really get a feel for the idea that he was a very "hands-on" worker and you can imagine him covered in grime after a day in the bowels of the Titanic.

Regards

Sam
 
Apr 22, 2012
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Hello Sam,

I have also saw this photo. It was on a website, and I had to e-mail the webmaster to find out which one was him.

I think I have been interested by Thomas Andrews ever since I first began to research the story of the Titanic. To me, Andrews seems to stand out in the story. His friendly and charming character, his actions that night and during the entire voyage, and his sacrifice that morning all fascinate me.

The man was happily married with a young daughter, and yet he only thought of the other passengers' safety and care. Now that took loyality and courage. I often wonder about what he must have been thinking as he did his quick sounding of the ship below decks and learned the truth. It couldn't have been easy on him.

I also find it a shame that his body was never recovered, or at least, never identified. He never even got to have a proper burial. Also, does anyone know if there is a memorial dedicated to Thomas Andrews? If there isn't, then I firmly believe that there should be.

-B.W.
 
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Sam Brannigan

Member
Feb 24, 2007
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The Ulster Titanic Society (see links) has the photo on its site and also a picture of the Andrews memorial hall in his home town of Comber
 

Sam Brannigan

Member
Feb 24, 2007
896
8
88
The Ulster Titanic Society (see links) has the photo on its site and also a picture of the Andrews memorial hall in his home town of Comber
 
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Emily Cunliffe

Guest
Thomas Andrews was a fine example of a brave and courageous man. The pictures I have seen of Thomas Andrews I thought he looked a very kind and honest person. It was a great shame to lose such a great person.
I thought I would just add that everyone, but all of you know anyway!

Best Wishes
Em!