Thoughts on the Iceberg


TitanicLove

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Jan 29, 2013
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When I think of the iceberg, I like to remember it was once part of a massive piece of ice. Rain water and snow accumulated over hundreds, or thousands of years; then one day, it breaks off and drifts down the Atlantic in the path of the greatest man made structure. The irony - a symbol of man's greatest achievement stopped dead in its tracks by a piece of mother nature. And so I look at the iceberg and wonder about all these questions. I wonder when the iceberg broke off and drifted down. Was it only months or years? Could it have occurred before the Titanic was even built? And how many years do you think it took for that ice to accumulate on the glacier? Hundreds of years? More, perhaps? Imagine, each rain drop, each snow flake, was like one minute, one day, ticking away to that fateful night, and for hundreds of years, generations of people came and went - until, that night, when the iceberg and the Titanic met in the Atlantic.
 

Blimp Edwards

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Jan 25, 2013
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I think about that kind of thing, too. Though I usually think about what happened to it after its collision with the Titanic, not before. One day it was no larger than an ice cube (though it probably separated into many pieces at the end of its life, so you can make that a handful of ice cubes), and then... gone forever.

If people knew then what a phenomenon the story would be, they'd have picked chunks of ice off and kept them in a freezer to sell at auction.

This might actually give you some insight into your questions: http://io9.com/5901952/whatever-happened-to-the-iceberg-that-sank-the-titanic

Dan
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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The iceberg was compacted from snow that fell on Greenland around 15,000 years ago, when human development hadn't yet progressed beyond the Stone Age. After breaking off from the coastal ice shelf it took a couple of years to reach the impact point, during which time it had already lost most of its bulk. As for the length of time it survived after the impact, traditional estimates were measured in months or even years, but a recent BBC documentary suggested just two weeks. Here are a couple of clips from the film, one concerning the birth of the iceberg and the other its possible demise.

BBC Two - Natural World, 2005-2006, The Iceberg That Sank the Titanic, The Titanic iceberg starts life as a snowflake
BBC Two - Natural World, 2005-2006, The Iceberg That Sank the Titanic, What happened to the iceberg which sank the Titanic?
 

Scott Mills

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Jul 10, 2008
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Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
I think about that kind of thing, too. Though I usually think about what happened to it after its collision with the Titanic, not before. One day it was no larger than an ice cube (though it probably separated into many pieces at the end of its life, so you can make that a handful of ice cubes), and then... gone forever.

If people knew then what a phenomenon the story would be, they'd have picked chunks of ice off and kept them in a freezer to sell at auction.

This might actually give you some insight into your questions: Whatever happened to the iceberg that sank the Titanic?

Dan

What an awesome idea. I think I shall now list the ice in my freezer in an auction as "ice that may contain water that composed the ice that sank Titanic!" :D
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Somebody else got in first with that one!

mad retailing.jpg

mad retailing.jpg
 

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