Tickets for the titanic


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Izleta Wells

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Im not sure where I should be posting this But Id like to know how and when people would have found out about the titanic and tickets...and inparticular if they would have been expensive for people like the sage family thanks izzy.
 
Jul 20, 2000
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Hello Izleta,

If you look at the Biography or/and Person Summary for John Sage you will see the family travelled on Ticket No. CA 2343, which cost £69 11s. That was for 7 adults and 4 children.

Looking at the Contract Ticket List [CTL] it seems that they were initially charged for 10 adults and 1 child; which included Forwarding [Rail Fares?] of £2 14s. They received a Supplementary Refund of £8 16s. After allowing for the deduction of Commission of £2 14s; White Star seems to have received a Nett Passage Money of £55 7s. So if I am understanding the CTL correctly [?] then the Sage family actually only paid £60 15s; which included Rail Fares of £2 14s.

You should find ticket information for each and every passenger listed on their Biography or and Person Summary on this web-site.

I hope that helps.
 
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Izleta Wells

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Thankyou very much Lester it does help alot :D Someone said it would have been like a year of Johns wages or there abouts, is that right?
 
Jul 20, 2000
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Hello Izleta,

Sorry, but I have no idea what wages were like in 1912. As a clue there would seem to be little value in looking at Titanic Crew wages as they would have had meals on top and in some cases been topped up with tips.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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John Sage was no ordinary working man. He had been self-employed as the owner of a small business (a bakery and off-licence) and the family home was quite substantial and separate from the business premises. The Sages were not wealthy, but they certainly weren't strapped for cash. After disposing of his assets in England, Mr Sage was able to buy outright a farm in Florida at a cost of well over £1000, and (a rare distinction for emigrants) to pay for the shipment of heavy goods like the family piano. His financial affairs appear to have been carefully managed, so it doesn't seem likely that he would have been struggling to pay for the tickets.
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Bob Godfrey

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A few notes on Edwardian wage levels and living costs at the lower end of the scale might be useful here.

The typical working week for most people was about 60 hours - 11 hours a day plus a half day on Saturday. Unskilled labourers would generally earn about £3 10s per month, a bit less than the stewards on Titanic, who also had their bed & board and tips as extras. A skilled man like a mechanic could expect £5-6 or perhaps more, depending on the levels of supply and demand for a particular skill.

Women in 1912 were generally paid less than men even when their work required a similar level of skill and effort. The ladies maids travelling on Titanic would mostly have been earning no more than £3 a month - rather less than the stewardesses on board. But of course anybody working in domestic service had their 'bed and board' as part of the deal, which looks better when compared to a skilled seamstress working piece rates who could be earning a little as £2 per month with no perks. The other members of the 'downstairs' component of a household could earn as little as 15 shillings per month for the most junior to as much as £15 (for the butler of a 'great house'), depending on the level of their responsibilities and the size of the household.

We are talking here about a period when the basic living expenses of a single man amounted to about £1 10s per month, and for a family with 3 children about £4. We can see, then, that it would be difficult to save enough money even for a 3rd Class Atlantic crossing for a family with only one breadwinner unless that breadwinner was at the very least a skilled artisan. On Titanic, we generally find that a passenger who was in the lowest-paid sector - for instance, a domestic servant or a farm labourer - was young, single and often making the crossing on borrowed money.
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Izleta Wells

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oh ok so they had no problems affording everything then...I would've thought they would have coz it still would have been really expensive 4 11 people moving to america and all but anyways
happy.gif
thanks
 
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