Tickets from retrieved bag


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Roger Bansemer

Guest
This isn't exactly about passenger research but during my dive to the Titanic in Aug. 2000 we retrieved a bag by William Allen. In the bag were these tickets. I think they are bus tickets. I can't read what was on them. If anyone is familiar with English bus tickets maybe they could make out what they might say.
Thanks for any help.
14446.jpg
 
Jul 29, 2001
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Roger,

To try to answer your question, if these are bus (or train, or ferry) tickets the pictures you show are presumably adverts on the reverse of the tickets. I assume the fronts (giving journey details) have faded, perhaps because these were printed using cheaper ink, whilst the advertisers' used more permanent ink.

best wishes,

bob
 
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Roger Bansemer

Guest
Dear Bob,
Thanks for the tip on "Home & Colonial" Makes sense. When you mentioned the advertisment then the words Ales and Stout came into view.
Do you have any idea what the "2 per 6" might mean?
Roger
 

Richard Paola

Member
Nov 17, 2001
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i would suggest bringing in a high resolution image of the ticket into Corel Photo paint and inverting some colours...it appears there's 2 words in red, the second beginning with the letter "S"...
 
Jul 29, 2001
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Roger,

2/6 meant "2 shillings and sixpence" before Britain decimalised its currency in the 1970's. This amount would also have been described as "half-a-crown". One "crown" was 5 shillings and there were 20 shillings to one pound (£1).

Incidentally, a "guinea" was 21 shillings and a "florin" was 2 shillings. "Sixpence" was always rendered as a single word.

By the way, did you notice our host Phil Hind's recent post noting the origins of the "LSD" symbols used for British coinage? (see Passenger Research: Ticket Numbering System, March 22nd).

Best wishes,

bob
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Mar 16, 2000
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Home and Colonial was a big chain of food stores. Originally they only sold five products, of which tea was one. That way they had great buying power.

I had a hard look at the Ale and Stout ticket. I'd just about bet that originally it showed the price of booze. It looked something like

PER
2/6
DOZEN

Those who know more about the price of booze in 1912 can correct me. It sounds reasonable, as you could get a pair of socks for one shilling.

Somebody seems to have written over the place where I think it read 'dozen.' Possibly TR(?).

I'd just about bet on train tickets. In my experience train tickets were made of relatively thick cardboard. (I wasn't there in 1912 but I'm old enough to remember some pretty ancient systems)
 
Jul 22, 2001
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kent uk
Hi Roger. You should take a look at the National Railway Museum website. Perhaps you could e-mail your pictures to one of their experts? They have absolutely loads of stuff they have collected and saved from old stations, maybe they have tickets that look like yours. The web addy is.. www.nrm.org.uk
Emma
 
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Roger Bansemer

Guest
Thanks everyone for the info on the tickets. I've emailed the Railway Museum and hopefully they'll be able to identify absolutely if they were bus or train.
 

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