Time Tunnel episode


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sharon rutman

Guest
There's going to be another Time Tunnel??? Wow. However, I won't hold my breath--it will be a politically correct nightmare and have plenty of--yipes--SEX. I thought the show looked a bit chopped up even though it's been years since I've seen the Time Tunnel. But then again, I was only ten years old when the series first premiered. Will hope for the best anyway.
 

Don Tweed

Member
Mar 30, 2006
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I also was about 10 when Time Tunnel came out.
Watched it religously.
I also remember the Custer series!!!
Man, talk about memories!
And yes, I did stay up and record
happy.gif

-Don
 

Pat Cook

Member
Apr 27, 2000
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For what it's worth, I, too, got up early to watch the "Time Tunnel" Titanic episode on Saturday. I have to admit I was more impressed with what they DID incorporate than by their fluffs.

For instance, all the dates and times were correct (more than I can say for "S O S Titanic"), they made sure to mention that Harland and Wolff were the ship's builders, the insignia on Smith's cap looked authentic (as far as I could tell) - even when Robert Colbert 'arrived' in the boiler room, we got to see a water-tight door behind him.

All in all, I thought they did a better-than-average job, considering the date of the premiere.

JMHO here.

Best regards,
Cook
 
Nov 22, 2000
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Is this the same programme that was shown in the U.K. thirty odd years ago (when I was a small child)I think I viewed it on my gas powered television! Sharon - sex on the television is all very well - but surely you fall off?

Geoff
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Had to think about that one a second Geoff- you rascal! Am picking myself up off the floor.
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Michael Rennie looks intrigued. Glad to see his cap cover is the right color- and that hat insignia DOES look pretty convincing.
 
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sharon rutman

Guest
Well, all of TV is consumed with Sex and Violence--that's why the original Time Tunnel is so nostalgically appealing in all its innocence (historical warts and all). Ah noogies--I forgot to record this epic Titanic episode for posterity but will attempt to record the entire series despite its ungodly hour. I'm not a prude Geoff, but wince at the attempt at a remake. (I still think Doug had a thing for Ann). Also, you can count on the remake being more politically correct as well. Oh Shelly, I didn't know that the Titanic was commanded by Captain Malcolm Smith, did you.
 
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Richard K. Mason

Guest
To; Sharon, Don, Shelly, Geoff, and all others;

I just finished browsing a web site devoted to the Time Tunnel. It's very interesting and if any of you have not already done so, check it out. Why? Well, the president of the British Titanic Historical Society, Carol Edwards, gives a complete synopsis of the first Time Tunnel episode comparing it to the actual known facts concerning the Titanic. {one fact she missed was that the newspaper Robert Colbert took with him back to 1912, had a photo of the "Lusitania" on the front page! Not the Titanic!}.

And get this; On the same site is a full description of what the new "Fox" version will be all about including cast and characters. Hoo Boy! I will let all of you decide for yourselves what to think after you read it!

The web site is:
WWW.GEOCITIES.COM/CODEREDLION/INDEX.HTML

Good Night To All,
Richard
 
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Richard K. Mason

Guest
Michael;
Good Morning,

My sincere apologies for the web site mix-up! After some research, you should be able to access the site using the following;
WWW.GEOCITIES.COM/CODEREDLION/PROJECT_TIC_TOC.HTML
Remember though, you have to use the SEARCH ENGINE to get there, NOT the normal go-to-web-site function. When you get there, it's the 2nd of the 2 listed sites you want. This one deals with the comparisons authored by Carol Young of the Brit. Titanic Hist. Soc. And the other site to learn about the new T.Tunnel series is;
THETIMETUNNEL@YAHOOGROUPS.COM
You may have to register for this one if you have'nt already.

Hope this helps! Sorry for the confusion.
Have a good day!
Richard
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Unfortunately, the revised URL doesn't work either. Is Geocities mixed up or are they killing sites as fast as they can be put up? (I've known them to do that occasionally.)

If not, you might want to simply cut and paste the URL from the address bar to your post. I do that and it avoids typos as well as saves time.
 
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sharon rutman

Guest
Try this--I just joined BOTH Time tunnel groups--click on to www.yahoo.com and scroll down to Entertainment/TV. Click on TV and scroll down again to Science Fiction and once in science fiction click on to Time Tunnel. That's how I did it--the long way. According to the up dated series on to be on Fox Doug is now a family man and Tony is now a woman--Toni!
 
Apr 11, 2001
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I find the Irwin Allen News Network offers good information on the series- and some nice photos for each episode.
http://www.iann.net
Sorry to repeat links- we have covered all of the above before but it has gathered dust in the archived threads.
Yes, actually I did know Rennie played Capt. Malcolm Smith. He also was the uncredited voice of the narrator in the 1953 TITANIC and played a ship's officer in the 1937 Australian release, "The Gangway". The uniform seemed to suit him.
 
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Richard K. Mason

Guest
To; Shelly, Michael C, Michael S., Sharon, and all others,

Thank you all for your patience and efforts to help me. I know I've exhausted this subject so I'll refrain from posting for a while. I really am most appreciative of the kindness all of you have displayed! One last thought.......After Tony and Doug had been transfered in time from the Titanic, what do you suppose would have happened if they'ed been sent to AUGUST 16, 1977, which, co-incidentally, is today being remembered all over the world 25 years later?

HMMMMMMMMM............?

Thank yuh, Ladies an' Gent'men, Thank yuh, ver' much!
 

Jan C. Nielsen

Senior Member
Dec 12, 1999
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I think everyone would be barfing out loud, in 1977. They should vomit over that stuff, even today. You know, the popularity of Elvis Presley and all the Elvis hysteria is a post-death phenomenon. During the later part of his life, Mr. Presley was laughed at. I can remember mentioning his name in music class during a presentation I gave on rock on roll music, back in 1967, everyone laughed. Do you remember how he looked when he died -- all puffed up, in his white jumpsuit. It's ridiculous that he's become this legend, and that "Graceland" is so popular.

For the record, "Time Tunnel" was a really bad show. I'll hope I never see it again.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Am not exactly certain how Elvis crept in here- must be because of today's anniverary. Maybe for your personal record it was a bad show- it was very popular with many people and posed some interesting scenarios and awakened genuine interest in some historical events. The History Channel wasn't around then- nor were children quite so sophisticated . Applying contemporary criteria to vintage programming frequently does a disservice to the program. The appeal of the program apparently extended beyond the teen population as many adults tuned in weekly to watch as well. It seems nostalgia has made a comeback in a big way as we babyboomers recall a simpler, gentle time. It may not be in a league with Masterpiece Theatre, but it was not bad for its genre and day. And as for how Elvis looked- I remember well that day 25 years ago-my reaction was how very tragic,- not ridiculous or vomit-inducing-, that a groundbreaking American music icon had died in such a manner, and what a terrible toll the fame and pressures of living in the public eye had taken. He is a legend because of amazing talent and his untimely death. That he died young and at the top of his potential is not unlike ,in some part, Titanic. She has become legend for similar reasons- the biggest, most beautiful, full of hope and potential- and gone unexpectedly and tragically at the top of her game-leaving us all gasping at the unfillable void. Such stuff legends are made of.
 

Jan C. Nielsen

Senior Member
Dec 12, 1999
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I strongly disagree, Shelley. Elvis was working with the FBI and J. Edgar Hoover, as an informant, to re-start his decrepit career. If he could stoop that low, barfing or vomiting is very appropriate --- both then, and now.

The funny thing is, that such people die, and they become legends, and people entirely forget what jerks they were in life. I see this time and again.

I think it's the phenomenon that W.E.B. Auden described in his poem about William Butler Yeats. When Yeats died, Auden poeticized that "He became his admirers." That's what we have here.

With Titanic, it's much the same. Very few people are critical of the ship's crew, or passengers, who died -- or of White Star's management. Time and again, I see on this message board somebody siding with, or apologizing for Captain Smith, or C. Bruce Ismay, even with the knowledge that they screwed up and killed over 1,500 people -- and even worse, walked away from the whole thing with impunity.

What we have on this board are Titanic's admirers --- I doubt that we have any tendency to find things wrong with the crew and passengers. We aren't concerned with what was wrong with them, we just admire them all, even if they don't deserve that admiration.

As Auden explained, Shelley:

Time . . . worships language and forgives,
Everyone by whom it lives,
Pardons cowardice, conceit,
Lays its honors at their feet.

Time that with this strange excuse,
Pardoned Kipling and his views,
And will pardon Paul Claudel,
Pardon him for writing well.


Like Elvis, like all.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Well Jan- we shall agree to disagree. I would hardly describe the man who packed the sold-out Vegas performances just before his death, one whose career was decrepit. Nor do I find people who want to see Graceland much different from people who feel compelled to go see the pier at Southampton from which Titanic departed, or make pilgrimmages to Pier 54. Tracing these steps help one feel connected to a person or event- and for some this can be a cathartic experience, bring understanding and insight. Elvis was a legend well before his death. Managing to adapt to a changing pop-culture climate and seeking out other venues for his unique talent,and in spite of terrible management in the form of Col. Parker (this in reference to his film career)- the King stayed afloat in the tumultuous music scene of the 60's. Titanic was the second of her class- and I daresay would not have been a legend but for her shocking demise and stellar passenger list. What constitutes a legend anyway- is it longevity, rare talent or contribution to society, unique characteristics? Certainly time can soften and shed a kinder light on undesirable flaws,- even Nixon is now more sympathetically remembered. I think also there is a distinct difference between heroes and legends. Capt. Smith and some of the Titanic people we all know and study are deemed heroes-not legends, although the ship itself has certainly attained legendary status. I doubt too many would say Elvis was an actual hero. How do we know what Smith's last deeds and thoughts were? They may well have been heroic-and although errors were made by many the night of April 14th, to err is human. To forgive faults and mistakes in others is to cut ourselves a break too. When I see the rusted derelict on the ocean floor- that is not Titanic any more than the sad drug-filled body on the bathroom floor was Elvis.
 

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