Titanic and Other Ships


Pat Winship

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May 8, 2001
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.... Or what have the Australians got that we haven't got?

Blue tongued lizards in their backyards, and a legal download of Lightoller's autobiography at http://gutenberg.net.au/plusfifty.html . Scroll down the page and you'll see it... provided you're Australian. The rest of you lot, hold up a minute.

TAOS can be legally posted in Australia because their copyright law is different. Public domain in Oz begins fifty years after the death of an author. Lights died in 1952, therefore it is a public domain work in Australia. However, in the UK, the rule is seventy years after the author's death, and in the USA, only works published prior to 1923 are public domain. So, as is clearly stated on the Project Gutenberg homepage, it is illegal to download or even view such books if they are under copyright in your country

Can they stop you from doing these things? No, they can't. But far be it from them or me to encourage you to break the law.

Pat W
 
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Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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To revert to my Aussie roots for a moment - with an extra dose of strine thrown in - 'Bonza! You little beau-tay!' and - nod to the croc hunter here - 'Crikey!'

To the person who got this online - thank you. This is one text which, for all its flaws and retrospective editing, I've always enjoyed reading and working with. It puts the lie to so many more recent characterisations of Lightoller, and gives you a feel for the man. It also provides a superb insight into his profession, both as it related specifically to him and how it was in general for merchant servicemen of his era.

A major addition to on-line resources - for those that are allowed to access it, of course.
 

Pat Winship

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May 8, 2001
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Hi, all

I've just been informed that Canada has the same law on public domain that Australia does. So, all you Canadians-- go right ahead!

Pat W.
 
Dec 8, 2000
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Whacko the billy-o, Pat! I'd use a few more colloquialisms, but have just been recently reminded that my constantly unparliamentary language is perhaps a tad inappropriate for polite company - but let's pretend I carried on in the same vein.
happy.gif
Anyway, bravo and well done you. This book is hard to find and often out of financial reach so will be a welcome addition to Project Gutenburg for many, across several interests. I'll be adding a link to this one on my site's section for Titanic e-texts as soon as I'm back next week.
 
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Mary S. Lynn

Guest
(Yawning with expected Yank impatience). Just want to say "Thanks a lot" for tempting us with non-downloadable links. Thanks, also, for the influx of local colloquialisms. Now, look. I watch TV with the best of you, and know all about "Crikey" and "Gorgeous - gorgeous"! I also know that "Foster's...Australian for beer!" commercial and that "shrimp on the barbie" stuff! I mean, who didn't see "Cry in the Dark" or "Thorn Birds"?? Geez..I'm gonna just Waltz my Matilda right on out of here, and get a local skagman to boil my billy at a billabong, OK? I don't think your cosi is cute anymore, either.
Harrumph! (said with Yank impertinence)
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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Aussies don't actually throw shrimps on the barbie. That was a translation for the US viewers. We eat prawns, when we can afford them.

Much old Aussie slang is now obsolete and few use expressions like "Bonzer, cobber!" The secret of speaking modern Oz is to hack a bit off long words and add y or ie. Hence television is telly, breakfast is brekkie and so forth. I'm told you look quite speckie in your two-piece cossie.

As a way round the problem of Lightoller's book, I sent a copy to the US. Not to my American mate, but to her toy koala. He's reading it to her every night.
 

Jim Stein

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May 1, 2003
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With show like Friends, Becker Southpark etc.
Must Aussie kids now-a-days use US slang, our culture is being swamped.
Came up with two more titles

The Sinking of the Titanic by Jay Henry Mowbray

Sinking of the Titanic and Great Sea Disasters, ed. by Logan Marshall

Just another Aussie battler
 

Pat Winship

Member
May 8, 2001
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Excuse me, Ms. Lynn. I'm a Yank, and you're dumping on some of my friends.

If the only parts of Titanic and Other Ships that interest you are those having to do with the sinking of the Titanic, they are readily available in a paperback book, The Story of the Titanic as told by its Survivors, published by Dover, ISBN 0486206106. If you would like to know what Lightoller did in his eventful life, then by all means, get Patrick Stenson's Titanic Voyager which is available in the US via the Titanic Historical Society and Michael Tennaro's website. If you're still not satisfied with that, then see if your local library will get the microfilm of the autobiography from the Library of Congress.

Or just do an illegal download of the online copy at Gutenberg. Big Brother is NOT watching you!

And kindly don't insult the Aussies. There are quite a few Australians on this board, who are likely to be very annoyed at the tone of your post. The person who created the hypertext is, in fact, a fellow Yank.

Oh, and as a music librarian, I must tell you that it's a swagman in Waltzing Matilda.

Pat Winship
 
Dec 8, 2000
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Good solution, Dave. I have a friend with a toy platypus that's interested in Titanic: they actually met at a Titanic gathering. I can only hope the platypus can read as well as your friend’s koala.

It's a nice change actually being able to access a particular out of print work by virtue of our geography rather than in spite of it. In nearly every other aspect of collecting or seeing out-of-print works and other Titanica we’re disadvantaged by the tyranny of distance. Surely no one would grudge us this once?

I also apologise if it was my use of colloquialisms that led to some of the comments above, as no insult was intended. My thanks to Pat for her part in all of this are genuine, and I thought she would appreciate the acknowledgement in such a way. This is an international board and while some of us are occasionally ‘divided by a common language’ I don’t see the harm in the occasional local term. Nor, would it seem, do many other posters who frequently use Americanisms or colloquial English.

ps Further to what Dave wrote about 'shrimps', no one drinks Fosters by choice — or at least I hope they don’t.
happy.gif
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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Chuckling away here - 'no worries', Mary...you're unlikely to find me or most other Aussies coming up with 'Bonza' or 'Cobber' these days, as Dave points out. My father seems only to trot out 'You Little Beau-TAY' when the cricket season is on and we're whalloping some other team. 'Crikey' is possibly on the way out - the 'Croc Hunter's' usage of it is quite deliberate, as he's hoping to revive interest in some dying colloquialisms. I do lapse into rhyming slang on occasion, itself a derivative of Cockney Rhyming slang, but one which we've adapted over a long period of time. Sticky Beak, hit the frog and toad, on your Pat Malone etc.

Ditto on the Fosters, Fi - shudder. VB is one of the bog-standard drinks, but I think you'll join me in a Carlton Cold or a Hahn Ice? Or if we're going to go all out, pick some boutique beer. But a nice flute glass of Yellowglen Premium would be great!

There's a backstory to this hypertext that can't go up on the net, unfortunately. But let's just say that many of the the Aussies here know exactly who it was who initiated this particular project and worked with the Project Gutenberg Oz team to get it up on-line. And it wasn't an Australian.

When I started with the flurry of strine it wasn't intended to alienate anyone - it was a bit of banter with Pat, who is a lovely lady who speaks with a bit of a Kentucky accent but who lives in Joisey - and an amused salute and acknowledgement of her Blue Tongue Lizard, a critter that came from chats we've had while discussing TAOS.
 
M

Mary S. Lynn

Guest
Oops - I seem to have started a bit of a controversy without intending to! Please accept my apology if my answer seemed flippant. I really didn't mean to estrange or poke fun at anyone...just trying to be humorous and join in the fun, and was hoping someone would reply in US slang! Once again, I apologize. I have several good Australian friends, and we banter back and forth on a regular basis. I don't see any harm in colloquialisms, either - in fact, I enjoyed reading the exchanges, and was chuckling aloud. Please keep up the good work, everyone, and my apologies again - especially for the swagman typo. (I had to sing that song in front of the whole class in 6th grade music, which probably resulted in my present stage-fright).

I actually was able to download that link after a few "This page is not available" attempts. It looks like it will take me awhile to read the 83 "small print" pages, but I thank you for the link, and it'll give me a chance to learn more about Beesley. (Think I'll have it bound while I pick up a new ink cartridge
happy.gif
!) Off to a comfortable reading spot...
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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No apology needed, Mary. We Aussies know when somebody is pulling our legs. I won't do me nana, or chuck a wobbly!
 
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Mary S. Lynn

Guest
Whew! Well, thank goodness for that, so I'll just "fuhgeddabaht it!"! Thanks, all.

I'm actually up to page 14, despite numerous interruptions during the day, including the well-loved and much-appreciated unsolicited salesperson. Right.
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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That's my atrocious attempt at an accent, Mark! But don't worry if it's waaaaay wide of the mark - as you may recall, or as Jemma could snigger, it doesn't matter if I try to do accents from Indian to Scots to Welsh...they all wind up the same dodgy Irish 'brogue'.
 

Pat Winship

Member
May 8, 2001
245
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Hi, all

Apologies to Mary for taking her post too seriously. As far as accents are concerned, my IQ plummets 50 points every time I open my mouth-- I have a rural Kentucky accent. (read redneck) Despite having lived 33 years in New Jersey, it's still with me. I did make one serious effort to lose it, and the results sounded so silly, I gave it up

Pat W
 
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Mary S. Lynn

Guest
Whatsa mattah wid youse guys dat youse don' know Joisey? Youse guys nevah been dere? I usta live dere, sos I know dis stuff areddy! Nuttin' wrong wid Joisey. Much.
I feel your pain, Pat. I've been transplanted to the Deep South, and remember having to ask a waitress (during my first - and last - venture into the Waffle (Awful) House what the heck "swate tay" was. (Pat will understand my confusion, I'm sure!).

Spent half the night reading Beesley's book, as the mighty lightning storm once again reared its ugly head, forcing me to unplug and disconnect anything electronic of value. (Lost my entire system a few months ago, despite a 2500 joules surge protector - came right through the cable line
sad.gif
) Anyway, my mind is muddled in small print and Beesley's occasional humor. I woke up this morning to find several pages spread out on my bed, with Here, Kitty contentedly purring atop page 43. I'm downloading Lightoller's book, too, so my summer reading program continues on course. Gotta get those things bound!
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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Well, I think it's a lovely accent, Pat. And I know what you mean about how sharply a regional accent can affect perceptions of intelligence. Indeed, I understand that there are many southerners (and presumably, in Oz, northerners from Queensland and the NT) who take deliberate advantage of people silly enough to believe that a slow draaaaaawl means a corresponding mental slowness. Some of the most highly intelligent folks I know have spoken with a distinct regional drawl, brogue or other marked speech characteristic. I keep a bit of a repetoire of accents at my disposal - when in form, locals here know that it's not a British accent, but can't quite place it. On other occasions, a decided 'Ozzing it up' can be an advantage.

Beesley's a cracking read, eh, Mary? Did you know that our own Pat Cook is currently at work on an annotated Beesley? Answering all those questions that have kept us guessing and wondering for years - who was he referring to there? What was that person? etc etc.