Titanic and Other Ships


M

Mary S. Lynn

Guest
Pat and Inger - not to worry about accents. As a transplant (job opportunity) into the "Deep South", I never felt that a "southern" accent belied any intellectual capability! What's the term...some of my "best friends" are from the South? Yes - they are, and smart as a whip! And I love them dearly! (I just don't care for sweet tea, heat/humidity, and mullets..but, that's just me! I didn't care for Rocky Mountain Oysters, Fourteener hikes, and Snow Bunnies, either!) ) I've always felt that it was to my advantage that - thanks to Dear Old Dad - I was an "Army brat", and was transplanted for years. As a result, I was fortunate to be able to live in many areas of the US and Europe. I hope I've learned to adapt, accept, and appreciate! I am thankful for my opportunity to have lived in many places, and I've often been able to place an American's origin by accent. Pat's native Kentucky accent, although Southern, is nowhere near the native accent from Mobile/New Orleans - also "Southern." (Laissez le bon temps roullez!) One of the first things I learned while here was the use of "fixin' to do/go". Another thing I learned was that "Gawdamsumbitch" was just an affectionate greeting! Ask me sometime about my observations of my best Canadian friend's speech. And I'm not talking about "eh"!

OK - off the soapbox for the time being.
 
M

Mary S. Lynn

Guest
Yes - I've been enjoying Beesley tremendously! Was he really that adept and proficient in the English language, or was he edited? What's the update on Pat Cook's annotation? Thanks, Inger! And special thanks to Pat Winship. I taught at New Brunswick High School for a couple of years. Her job sounds far more interesting!
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,046
57
208
UK
Yes indeed, Mr Beesley was very proficient in the English language (clearly unlike any of us! :). He was a Cambridge scholar, a scientist and a teacher. That amounts to a trained observer with an eye for detail, an insatiable curiosity and expert communication skills. And of course he was there, and for that we can all be eternally grateful.
 
M

Mary S. Lynn

Guest
Thanks, Bob. I just thought it was a bit too perfect! Don't get me wrong - I admire and promote perfection in writing (while making many personal mistakes in the attempt), and may have assumed that his writing was edited. My own surely was! (A 20-page short story with visions of grandeur became an 8-page whodunit). He definitely had an eye for detail (refer to future post) and classic communication! I have been enjoying Beesley's 83-page treatise, but I must admit that I have to take occasional breaks to just say, "Wow"!
 

Pat Winship

Member
May 8, 2001
245
2
148
Hi, all!

Mary, you'll find Lightoller a bit less elegant of phrase than Beesley. Lights is unafraid to write exactly as he must have spoken, and his sentence fragments drove a friend who is a fine grammarian right up the wall-- she was dying to fix them! The value of his book is that it's like sitting down with him and listening to him tell stories. He was a charming man, and it comes through quite plainly if you read more than the Titanic chapters, which are familiar to many of us here.

I've sort of taken over the job of helping people get hold of TAOS over the past few years. My interest in Titanic began with an interest in her lively Second Officer. I was able to locate a copy of his book near me at the New York Public Library. It was in terrible condition, but with careful handling, I was able to photocopy it-- despite some unexpected sabotage from its author's sprightly sense of humor. I kept cracking up as bits of text caught my eye. I've been sharing photocopies with people ever since.

I'm really glad to see it on the Web, and so is our head of Interlibrary Services. I was running through her toner and paper at an alarming rate, and she was a little peeved about it!

Enjoy!

Pat W
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
M

Mary S. Lynn

Guest
Hello, Pat! I've been printing off Lightoller's book (page after page..cartridge after cartridge..ream after ream). I have maxed out my AMEX card, and now rely on public assistance for basic survival needs: Jalapeno cheddar poppers, Gummi Bears, Lotso-pulp OJ, and cable connection. A girl's gotta do what a girl's gotta do! Thanks a lot...I think!
 
M

Mary S. Lynn

Guest
P.S., Pat - Just want you to know that I appreciate your perseverence in allowing us to download and print very special information! I, personally, have been able to access and file Titanic documents that I would not have been able to do without your help! "Pass that swate tay, darlin', cuz I'm fixin' ta read all night!"
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Pat Winship

Member
May 8, 2001
245
2
148
Well, Mary, I'm feeling sort of downhome tonight myself. Tomorrow's my birthday, and the only way I can get the sort of birthday cake I want is to make it myself. It has a caramel fudge icing to die for, made with cream and white sugar, and nothing else. Nobody up here knows how to do it. And swate tay; isn't that South Carolina and vicintity? Have a friend (from Minnesota!) attending college at USC, and that was the first regionalism she picked up on.

Cheers!

Pat W.
 
M

Mary S. Lynn

Guest
"Swate tay" seems to have localized itself from Virginia to Louisiana, and all Confederate states in between. (Think Mason-Dixon.) For those of you not in the know, "swate tay" (sweet tea) is 6 ounces of brewed tea bastardized by 5 pounds of sugar. It looks and tastes like a "tea sno-cone". Some swate tays are rather crunchy. Some have been watered down by ex-pat Yankees, thank Gawd!
Happy Birthday, Pat! My mom, born and bred in Alabama, made us that pound cake with caramel icing for our birthdays since we were infants with no teeth! To this day, I discard the cake and freeze the caramel icing. (Don't tell my mom, though.) Have a very Happy Birthday, Pat!
 

Deborah Kogan

Member
Jan 29, 2003
157
0
146
Happy Birthday, Pat. I want to point out to folks who like Beesley's memoir (I read it, and those of Lightoller and Col. Gracie in the Dover collection of Titanic survivor tales) should see the video of "S.O.S. Titanic" which is roughly based (with some fiction) on that memoir, with David Warner playing Beesley. I saw it right after I read the book and could recite along with the script, even though I had never seen the movie before... My favorite parts in the book were the description of the last sunset, and the sad librarian.
 
Dec 8, 2000
1,288
2
168
quote:

...the sad librarian.
Deborah - Beesley's description of Library Steward Thomas Kelland touched me too and was the inspiration for a couple of my Titanic related 'projects'.

Mary - no worries, mate. 'It's a joke, Joyce' is another handy turn of phrase for moments like this.
happy.gif
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Dec 3, 2000
5,342
34
208
Pat, when's that B'day? The 31st (today) or the 1st (tomorrow)??

Pat Cook's Beesley is fairly well advanced, Mary, although only he could tell us exactly where it's at. Having seen the ms, it's shaping up to be a superlative read. He's worked not only with researchers, but also with the Beesley family to produce what will be a work in the very top tier of Titanic volumes.

FWIW, I've got a thoroughly bast...um...mixed accent too - comes from being hauled around countries and school systems as a 'diplomatic brat.' I've been part educated in Australian, American and UN education systems and have lived in Austria, Australia, America, Singapore and the UK so I'm all over the map in terms of not only accent but also colloquialisms etc that I use.
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,046
57
208
UK
Birthday greetings, Pat. What was it the late great Mr Hope said about birthdays? "You know you're getting old when the candles cost more than the cake!" I'm sure you have no such problem, but at my last birthday I ran out of matches.

Back to Beesley: who but he would observe the technicalities of disaster with the eye of a scientist and then turn to the words of Shakespeare to describe the night sky seen from a lifeboat - "Jessica, look how the floor of heaven is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold".
 

Pat Winship

Member
May 8, 2001
245
2
148
Ing, it's today-- July 31st. And Bob, yes, I do rather have that problem. If you really want to know, I'm 57, and not ashamed of it-- nor of the fact that most of my best friends are half my age!

I'm also delighted that it's August 1 in Oz, the second anniversary of the Gutenberg Project's Australian server. Since TAOS is their 250th e-book, they're planning to celebrate it in some fashion. I've heard rumors of something to do with the guns at Fort Denison, but they must be kidding...

Pat W.
 
M

Mary S. Lynn

Guest
Talk about those accents, Inger! When I spent a summer in London (a million years ago) , we would (of course) frequent a favorite pub most days. The owner made a 15-pound wager with us/me that I couldn't fool a rival pub owner with a fake British accent. He and the missus coached me each evening over half-pints of lager and Scotch eggs, not only in accent, but in dress and appearance. (I spent 6 pounds on a khaki skirt and a grey "jumper"). I also had to buy packs of Benson and Hedges to offer to anyone near me. The main thing I learned? Was to end each sentence as a question? Even though it wasn't a question? Anyway, it took four whole days before I was found out! I lost the bet, but there was quite a celebration! In lieu of the 15 pounds (about $45.00 then) , I sent our favorite owner two pairs of Levis jeans and one Levi Western shirt....which cost me much more than 15 pounds! He and his wife sent me a "Pink Floyd - The Wall" poster as thanks....which I lost in the divorce. Sigh. Those were the good old days! Don't even ask me about my dismal experience in a pub in Edinborough, though. That was a complete embarassment.
Happy Birthday once more to Pat! (I just bought 57 candles in March. The only problem was the leftover wax and how to dispose of it.) Have the best birthday ever!
 
M

Maxim A. Nikulin

Guest
Wow! Thank you people for the great links!
BTW-doyou know about A Night to Remember
e BooK , can it be found?

Once Again thank you!
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Dec 3, 2000
5,342
34
208
A Night To Remember is still in copyright, Maxim, so you won't find it as a Project Gutenburg electronic text. As far as I know, the publishers have not made it available as an e-book.
 
M

Mary S. Lynn

Guest
Maxim: Strastvitye, moy svet! Kak vwi pozhevaitye? Khorosha! Oo menya chetirye godya Russki yazik. Ochen ploxhaya. My Russian leaves much to be desired...obviously. If you are able to access Amazon.com, you can get a copy of ANTR for $.99..plus shipping. The shipping will be ochen mnoga rubles.

Rastvetalie, yablanie ee grushi
Poplelie tomanie nad reckoi
Vwi khodila na bereg Katoosha
Na vwisokie, na bereg krootoy.
 
M

Maxim A. Nikulin

Guest
Thank you very much for learning and
talkin' Russian moia dorogaia Mary!
I know well how to bye it- maybe I will-
anyway- it's either to wait or to bye!
happy.gif


Vi ochen' horosho protsetirovaly nashu
moshno skasat' odnu is samih lubimih pesen!
happy.gif

Spasibo!
[You quoted very well our -I may say , one
of the fav. songs ---Thank you! (trans for those who cannot speak Russian)]

Inger Sheil - yes I guess so
sad.gif
But let us hope it
'll appear on the net- A year ago I didn't even dream of readin' Light's Titanic and other Ships!
happy.gif
 
M

Mary S. Lynn

Guest
Strastvwie, Maxim. Ya cit po gorlo of ANTR - I think I've read it five or six times.

Dosvedanya!