Titanic baby name


Nov 1, 2007
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A girlfriend of mine, who also happens to be a Titanic buff, had a baby about 3 weeks ago and she and her husband decided to name him Thomas Andrews Connelly. What do you all think of this? Is this something common among parents on the Titanic community? I look forward to hearing your opinions!
 
Nov 1, 2007
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I like it the moment I heard it. I was curious what others thought because her family made it clear they thought it was a 'stupid idea'. Has anyone else thought of doing this with their children? I myself have entertained the idea, it was just a matter of finding the right name.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>Has anyone else thought of doing this with their children?<<

Never had the thought occur to me. I never got around to starting a family but if I had, I suppose I might have named any offspring in honour of members of my own extended family.
 

Jim Currie

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Apr 16, 2008
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There are people who have given their sons the first names of the entire Manchester United football team or dare I say it: the entire english football team that won the world cup sometime during the last millenium!

What's the difference?

I go along with Michael.
 

Jason D. Tiller

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Aug 20, 2000
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quote:

Has anyone else thought of doing this with their children?

The thought hasn't occurred to me either, but perhaps when my girlfriend and I decide to start a family, then maybe I will think about it.

quote:

Oh, fine. Make the rest of us look bad, Michael.

Huh?
eh.gif
 
May 27, 2007
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I thought about naming my daughter Madeleine after Madeleine Astor or Eleanor after Mrs' Ryerson but just the first names not the last names. We had like 50 names picked out and whittled 'em down like any parent does. I like Thomas and Andrew. That works quite nicely. Thomas Andrew Lorton or I could honor the Captain Smith and Andrews and go with John Andrew which are both family names anyways.

If you all have a girl and want to use the Names Thomas or Andrew or John you could try the feminine versions like Andrea Jane or Thomasina or Tamsin Andrea. Andrea is my mothers name so perhaps if I have another daughter I'll name her Andrea Jane Lorton to honor Captain Smith and Thomas Andrews and call her Jennie to honor Jane Austen and Jennie Churchill. Probably not gonna happen but I didn't think the first one was gonna happen so never say never. Besides I love Baby Naming. It's one of the few things I'm good at.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Geo, About Andrea. Back in 8th grade, I had a teacher who was born on July 26th, 1956. And, was part of a pair of twins named Amy (twin) and Andrea (her). And, yes, the name was chosen because of the ship. I had the tact not to point out the obvious.....

Come to think of it, at what point did "Andrea" jump the gender line and become a feminine name? My generation (1964-1968) was awash in girls named Andrea. My 1956 born 8th grade teacher is about the OLDEST female Andrea I've come across.

Silly, I know, but did the disaster play a role in shifting Andrea/Andrija from male to female?
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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Of course "Titania" and "Olympe" would be stellar names for twins, with "Brittany" an acceptable stretch for the triplet.
 
May 27, 2007
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quote:

Come to think of it, at what point did "Andrea" jump the gender line and become a feminine name?
Not silly! I think it started in the 20's or so because my Mom was named after actresses Andrea King and Andrea Leeds two 40's stars! Well, that where Grandma got the name for my mother. She just liked Andrea and the name was popular by the 40's. Not mega popular but quietly popular. Although there was an Andrea Beaton who was a settler at James Town in the early 17th Century!

I was almost an Andrew George but for a flip of a coin!​
 
May 27, 2007
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quote:

Of course "Titania" and "Olympe" would be stellar names for twins, with "Brittany" an acceptable stretch for the triplet.
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Too folksy for me. But to each their own! I getting to like Andrea Jane more and more though and will suggest it to the next friend I find out is expecting.​
 
Jun 11, 2000
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Well, at the risk of sounding an 'Old World' and very dull note here ... I do think you have to consider the children throughout their lives.

We Europeans stand both in awe and bewilderment at the American talent for constructing names, though the tendency is making its way across the Pond, to Britain at any rate, if not much further. But, as I say, you do have to consider the effect of the name during adulthood (which is most of someone's life) and thus perhaps choose a name which stands alone, regardless of celebrity fashion at the time of their birth, or the desire to create an unusual 'brand' by making one up. That's simply bound to go wrong more often than it goes right. Not that this is new - J M Barrie introduced us to 'Wendy' via Peter Pan, which sounds good when you are 6, but maybe not quite so good when you are 46. But what about calling your daughter 'Apple' or 'Peaches'?

Life would be very difficult, I agree, if everyone were called John and Mary, but luckily there are many more options available, which stand the test of time / ageing rather better than Britney probably will. And always coming round again are rather nicer older names, which once went out of fashion, but get resurrected. Some countries have a register of permitted names, so that everyone gets something reasonably dignified.

I have to admit that I went for tradition and called mine Benjamin and James, which allow for some individuality as they grow older (Ben & Jim, if they like). Go for the Bible. You might or might not believe in it, but you can't beat it for names. Had I had a girl, I was thinking about Miranda - which is also quite old, though Shakespearean not Biblical.
 

Ernie Luck

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I'm with you Monica, most of our family - up to recent generations at any rate - have good old English family names.

You also have to consider how forenames match up with surnames. I read many years ago of a chap whose surname was 'Bird'. He gave all his children middle names of a different variety of bird. You have to feel sorry for the poor girl named 'Bluetit' Bird.

A name I like is 'Charlotte' although don't know why the nickname is Bessie?
 

Jim Kalafus

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ima_Hogg

Doesn't get much worse than this.

I went to college with a fellow who went by the first name of "Powers." His parents, in a burst of 1971 radical-pride had dubbed him "Power to the People," a name which he legally changed upon reaching his majority.

Still, I think the most cloying name affectation is "customizing" commonplace names to make them more "distinctive." Especially with internal capital letters:

JaySon
JacqueLynn
"Emileigh"

>Go for the Bible. You might or might not believe in it, but you can't beat it for names

My own long-estranged children, Beulah, Kibroth-Hattaanah, and Yakman never forgave me for going biblical.
 

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