Titanic Basic Mistakes and Amateur Errors: What's Your Experience (and Internally Enraged Reaction)?


Harland Duzen

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This isn't a basic mistake but more of a editing mistake I just found from the 1997 film, nevertheless it's quite funny.

I noticed as the Stern is dragged to a vertical position, one of the passengers crawling to the stern railings just ''pops'' or dematerialises out of existence! What happened to him!?! :eek:

(Watch between 48:40 and 48:43 and look at the Top Left corner of the video.)
 

Harland Duzen

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Now this is a interesting way to tie in two films into the same universe. Looks like that theory of Jack being a time traveler might have some creditability after all! ;)

On another note: James Cameron's going to need to have a word with the VFX team...
 

Harland Duzen

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It's April 1st, so you all know what that means. I been waiting months to pull off this one...

During the Enquires 2nd Officer Charles Lightoller is often cited as calling the enquires and everyone's testimony as "Whitewashed". Little did he know he would be caught in the act!
alb4.jpg

Charles Lightoller "Whitewashing" his testimony May 1912*.

April Fools!
________________

*The original photo is of Officer Charles Lightoller BUT was taken aboard the White Star Line's SS Teutonic on the 5th August 1909 when he was painting wood as part of some crate or ship's panel. Original photo belongs to the Bell Photo Album and can be found here: Great Ships: The Postcard and Ephemera Collection of Jeff Newman - The Bell Album .
 
May 3, 2005
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This image pretty much sums up my rage... :mad:
View attachment 3850
Hello, Martin-
I can understand your rage.

This looks more like a Cunarder leaving Southampton ?
"ARD" may be seen at the extreme left of the photo.

I understand Titanic did not dock at Queenstown but was anchored some 2 miles (?) out and passengers boarded the ship or left the ship via tenders.

Same as at Cherbourg.

Of course there other instances where Olympic was shown as Titanic.

I am sure watchers have seen many more glaring errors in the video.
But the one which struck me was the one which stated "Titanic was sold out."
Which - of course - was certainly not the case....far from it.
 
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Harland Duzen

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Hello, Martin-
I can understand your rage.

This looks more like a Cunarder leaving Southampton ?
"ARD" may be seen at the extreme left of the photo.

I understand Titanic did not dock at Queenstown but was anchored some 2 miles (?) out and passengers boarded the ship or left the ship via tenders.

Same as at Cherbourg.

Of course there other instances where Olympic was shown as Titanic.

I am sure watchers have seen many more glaring errors in the video.
But the one which struck me was the one which stated "Titanic was sold out."
Which - of course - was certainly not the case....far from it.
Thank you for helping to bring this thread back to the original topic Robert, otherwise I would have kept veering it to jokes and stuff.

The actual photo of was taken in New York at the Cunard Berth prior to the extended piers being constructed (around / after 1907 possibly? RMS Lusitania - Wikipedia).

Sadly though the author of that particular photo just assumed it was the Titanic without even checking or comparing it to any other photos of her. It would appear that many think that any photo of a 4-Funneled Liner must be Titanic, despite the two looking barely alike.

Another issue / flaw I see is the newsreel commonly shown in many documentaries. While most of it is Olympic which is fine, They also repeatedly show footage of either the Lusitania / Mauretania and an unknown ship (,This is better explained here at: "Olympic Class" Film Archive (1908 - 1937) | William Murdoch under "Common Errors").
 

Tracy Smith58

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Mar 10, 2018
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One thing I read in a book several years ago was when the Californian was still at the scene where the lifeboats had been picked up and Carpathia had left. Groves had supposedly pointed out "people" walking around on an iceberg, but that Captain Lord had dismissed the moving figures as seals and did not investigate further. This was meant to be a damning illustration of Lord's indifference; that he'd left these "people" to die.

Never mind that no one would have lasted long enough in the water to swim over to an iceberg, let alone had enough dexterity to haul themselves up onto a slippery piece of ice and still be up and moving in sopping wet clothes hours later. Or that the Carpathia had missed such "people" during their scans of the area. That entire story insulted my intelligence.
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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The seals story is from Charles Groves, who wrote The Middle Watch years after the event. I recovered it with the aid of the Wayback Machine. Here's the relevant bit. The third officer was Groves.

The sea was covered by a large number of deck chairs, planks and light wreckage. The Californian steamed close alongside all the lifeboats which the Carpathia had left floating, and it was particularly noted that they were empty. Scanning the sea with his binoculars, the Third Officer noticed a large icefloe a mile or so distant on which he saw figures moving, and drawing Captain Lord's attention to it, remarked that they might be human beings. He was told that they were seals. The Californian now made one complete turn to starboard followed by one to port and then resumed her passage to Boston passing the Canadian Pacific steamship Mount Temple, and another steamship of unknown nationality.
 
May 3, 2005
2,305
183
133
Hello, Martin-
I can understand your rage.

This looks more like a Cunarder leaving Southampton ?
"ARD" may be seen at the extreme left of the photo.

I understand Titanic did not dock at Queenstown but was anchored some 2 miles (?) out and passengers boarded the ship or left the ship via tenders.

Same as at Cherbourg.

Of course there other instances where Olympic was shown as Titanic.

I am sure watchers have seen many more glaring errors in the video.
But the one which struck me was the one which stated "Titanic was sold out."
Which - of course - was certainly not the case....far from it.
Just an explanation of an error that I somehow I allowed to creep in.
The paragraph about the "glaring errors in the video" should have been cited as in reference to the 1953 version of the movie "Titanic", which is notorious for all of its errors.
The reference to "sold out" was when Richard Sturges (Clifton Webb) arrives at Cherbourg to purchase a ticket he is told that "Titanic has been sold out for months." Of course there were plenty of cabins, etc.available in all classes. He ends up bribing a couple to get a ticket to get on Titanic.
Another "nit pick" is the scene at Cherbourg is shown as a somewhat foggy day instead of the late evening when Titanic loaded passengers at Cherbourg.
 
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