Titanic: Blood and Steel


DavidHR

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Dec 23, 2019
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Johannesburg, South Africa
Hi All,
I am not sure if this thread is still alive, but I have just watched the series on Amazon Prime and I noticed a few issues that I like to hear other people's opinion on. Before the launch, they refer to her at "Titanic". Surely, she was 401 until launched. It would have been poor form to use her name before the formal naming ceremony. The talk of the next ship as "Gigantic". The next ship to built for the White Star was the "Britannic". Why not use that name?
Were H&W really so aware of the safety issues during the construction of 401? Is that just creative licence? The inquest did not mention any of this and nobody came forward at the time saying that the shipyard knowing used substandard rivets.
In the launch shots, it shows the superstructure already in place complete with the four distinctive funnells. However there is a scene before the launch when they show the fully assembled boilers in a shed. I understand that the boilers, the triple expansion engine and the turbine were all added after launching. How could that be done with the upper decks already in place? What would the build sequence be?
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
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There are several things here. Titanic was launched with the sides of the superstructure in place but with large holes in the decks. These enabled the boilers, etc, to be lowered in by a floating crane. The funnels were added very late in the building.

All the ships were named very early in the planning stages. Photos show big notice boards erected in front of each ship as they sat in the gantry. They show the name of the ship and the White Star name.

The Gigantic story is a fairy tale. There is not a single record of the name from H & W or White Star. It's source is found in papers and magazines, usually accompanied by ridiculous dimensions. Some years ago, I found a reference that shows the third ship was called Britannic at least as early as May 1911. At the US inquiry, Bruce Ismay mentioned that Captain Smith had been the master of "the old Britannic". He knew the new ship was to be a new Britannic. Like the other ships, Britannic was built behind a big sign with her name on it.
 
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Nov 14, 2005
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Hi All,
I am not sure if this thread is still alive, but I have just watched the series on Amazon Prime and I noticed a few issues that I like to hear other people's opinion on. Before the launch, they refer to her at "Titanic". Surely, she was 401 until launched. It would have been poor form to use her name before the formal naming ceremony. The talk of the next ship as "Gigantic". The next ship to built for the White Star was the "Britannic". Why not use that name?
Were H&W really so aware of the safety issues during the construction of 401? Is that just creative licence? The inquest did not mention any of this and nobody came forward at the time saying that the shipyard knowing used substandard rivets.
In the launch shots, it shows the superstructure already in place complete with the four distinctive funnells. However there is a scene before the launch when they show the fully assembled boilers in a shed. I understand that the boilers, the triple expansion engine and the turbine were all added after launching. How could that be done with the upper decks already in place? What would the build sequence be?
She was known as and named Titanic well before the launch. She was refered to as such numerous times in the press during her construction. Anyway, Welcome to the board...Cheers.
P.S....there are many photos of Titanic during construction with her name on the side. Many say these photo's are doctored with the name added. Some I believe are from the looks of them. Others I'm not so sure. They could have been temporary for the photographers then painted over. Or just to make sure some poor newbie went to the right ship. You know what happens when you go to the wrong ship!
 

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