Titanic Bloopers

May 3, 2005
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>>I will not even mention that the Navy Hymn, "Eternal Father" was sung in the second class service on April 14 - not the first class service.<<

And the verse which ends "For those in peril in the air" wasn't written until much later.
 
May 3, 2005
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>>It's a shame Cameron didn't include outtakes and bloopers in the updated Titanic dvd collection. I bet there were some real doozies and we can all use some laughs too.<<

I may have an earlier version but it does include some bloopers. (Re: "Special Collector's Edition" - 3 DVD set)

I think in one Jack says "I've got lungs in my air. "
 
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Alyson Jones

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There's another mistake, when Jack is with Rose on the boat deck (1st class area) with the art drawings. Third class ticket holder's are not permitted ever to be on the boat deck during the voyage.

I'm not sure if someone else has already mention this one but when Jack tries to enter the church scene, and was refused permission to enterthat's also wrong. Church scene was open for all classes.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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3rd Class passengers weren't permitted to enter 1st Class territory (or vice versa) at any time - including the Sunday service. This separation wasn't just a matter of White Star Line regulations, it was demanded by the US immigration authorities. So each Class of passengers had their own Sunday services in their own public rooms.
 
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Alyson Jones

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>>3rd Class passengers weren't permitted to enter 1st Class territory (or vice versa) at any time - including the Sunday service<<

What you just mention sounds right.Never thought it that way.Of cause to keep the 1st class passengers from mites and all that.
Why on another thread on here and on Titanic-Titanic states the other wise, meaning it was open to all classes.Like other members said the same thing.But what you just mentioned sounds right.
 
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Alyson Jones

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I found another mistake in James Cameron's movie. I just found a film with an Titanic crew member survivor (old) which he talks about Titanic sinking that night.

Titanic actually lists to one side during the sinking in april 1912.
In the movie, Titanic never lists at all during the sinking in the movie.
 
May 3, 2005
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This really has nothing to do with the bloopers. I first saw the 1953 Titanic at a downtown movie theater whle on liberty in San Diego.
Main interest was not so much from the historic viewpoint but in the sometimes snappy dialogue between Stanwyck and Webb.
Favorite lines were when Stanwyck tells Webb that son "Norman" is going to grow up to be like him. Webb replies " PossIbly. I'm satisfied." BTW this marks me as a bit aged, but Robert Wagner and I were about the same age when the movie was made. Wife says we still are.
 
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Arun Vajpey

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There are plenty of bloopers in all the Titanic related films. In A Night To Remember there was the non-existent Christening ceremony complete with a bottle of champagne, Kenneth More's Lightoller all but saving every survivor by himself (including floating off Collapsible A) and worst of all, the smoke from one of the funnels going the wrong way in one of the sinking frames (with Ismay's face in the foreground). The 1953 film Titanic and 1979 TV movie SOS Titanic are so full off bloopers that they are not even worth mentioning. But for a Titanic purist like me the biggest bloopers of all are in Cameron's film: they are called Jack and Rose.
 
May 3, 2005
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J. Bruce Ismay and Thomas Andrews do not appear in the 1953 movie. The Thelma Ritter character (" Maude Young" I think ?) is said to be "a thinly disguised Molly Brown". One source said there were still some members of those families still living and they were afraid of lawsuit.
 

Kyle Naber

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The dome collapses while lower windows are still exposed, when in reality, they should be much farther under the water.
 
May 3, 2005
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Popped the 1953 Titanic in the VCR to do a little homework last night-had been years since I sat through it- and wanted to check on the bloopers already listed. The steward at the beginning does have the Astors in A-56, the ice warning comes from the Baltic first, then somehow one from the Caronia turns up dated April 12 which arrives on the 14th. They all seem perplexed about this and one officer mumbles to himself whether they may be about different bergs. Richard Sturges who gets aboard by convincing a sterrage passenger in Cherbourg to sell his ticket, boards with no luggage. Miraculously a full- service tailor and haberdashery appears aboard Titanic with full dinner dress available for Richard and long pants for Norman. Was delighed to hear Annette's wardrobe contained designs by Lanvin and Lucile! Also magically appearing was a sort of ballroom where many couples were swaying enthusiastically to the strains of a good-sized orchestra with a brass and wind section. Sunday morning's hymn-sing produced out of frame a wheezing pump organ. Annette appears hatless ondeck several times which may have been unusual for an 18 year old debutante- Barbara Stanwyck also seems to wear one only at boarding. Most of the hats do have broad brims, but significantly smaller than was the rage for 1912. Most unlikely is the scene in the men's smoking room where Maude Young's Molly Brown character presides over a 24-hour poker marathon which has Clifton Webb's character shaving in a corner whilst Barbara Stanwyck observes from a fainting couch in the corner. The ship IS holed on portside in the underwater scene of the spur, with the berg popping up on alternating sides in various frames. The ship develops a great list to port where it increases wildly as the film goes on. Sometimes the actors remember to struggle while walking but often forget and stroll against the leaning deck angle like a stroll in the park. Fleet makes the sign of the cross when he sees the berg- maybe high-church anglican? Just before the final plunge the lights aboard flash on and off like a bad neon sign for many minutes as the Strauses sing "Nearer My God to Thee"- a Christian hymn- with gusto along with a perfectly composed throng of men with all the panache of the Mormon Tabernacle choir. Still and all the film works..and a lump does rise in the throat when Barbara receives Norman's little gloves in the lifeboatand father and son have that last poignant conversation at the rail. Catch any more?
I saw the 1953 version first on the big screen in San Diego. I was in the Navy on Liberty and was completely ignorant of never having even heard of the Titanic disaster at that time.
However, thanks to this website I know at least a bit more than I knew in 1953.
 
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Athlen

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From a deleted scene:
Jack: "Well, I didn't care so much for that dadism and cubism, it just had no heart to it."
Rose: "I like some of it."
Dadaism (Jack says "dadism") didn't exist in 1912; its earliest manifestations were in 1915.
 

Kyle Naber

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Oct 5, 2016
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Oh, well I guess I didn't pay attention to that line! I've watched the deleted scenes a few times on the Blu-Ray copy. (And all of the different commentaries for an excuse to watch the film four times) :)
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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An error that is in both the 1997 film and the 1953 version is that somebody gets on board using somebody else's ticket. This simply couldn't be done. The tickets bore the names of the people covered by it. Each ticket was checked by somebody from the purser's staff, who tore off a strip with the names on it from its right hand edge and kept it for the ship's records. The passengers kept the rest. Cameron glosses over the problem by having Jack and Fabrizio dash past the officials, but they wouldn't have got away with that in real life.
 
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I've read these posts with great interest.
I love the older Titanic movies, especially A Night to Remember and Titanic with Clifton Webb and Barbara Stanwyck.
I've seen the Cameron version, and there's only one scene that I really like about it that bears my comparison.
The scene where Rose tells her fiance (can't remember his name, sorry) "I'd rather be his whore than your wife!" and spits in his face, is brutal, yes, I'll admit that. But to my mind, it is as NOTHING to the five little words that Julia (Barbara Stanwyck) says to Richard (Clifton Webb). When he says "No court on Earth, no Power in Heaven will keep me from my son" she looks him in the eye and says "He is not your son." To me, THAT is the verbal equivalent of spitting in his eye, slapping his face, punching him in the gut, kneeing him in the crotch, knocking him on his face, and kicking him in the ribs. You can't see his face because his back is to the camera, but I'm willing to bet that his expression would be of a man who just had all that done to him.
Sometimes actions speak louder than words, but sometimes the words are more powerful than action. :)
 
May 3, 2005
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An error that is in both the 1997 film and the 1953 version is that somebody gets on board using somebody else's ticket. This simply couldn't be done. The tickets bore the names of the people covered by it. Each ticket was checked by somebody from the purser's staff, who tore off a strip with the names on it from its right hand edge and kept it for the ship's records. The passengers kept the rest. Cameron glosses over the problem by having Jack and Fabrizio dash past the officials, but they wouldn't have got away with that in real life.
One more nit-pick (mine) LOL
I assume there were no photographs of the ticket holders or description of them on the tickets.
How would the boarding official know that Jack and Fabrizio weren't the persons listed on the tickets ? Could be just two American cousins, one with an American accent and one with an Italian accent ?

In the case of RIchard Sturges it might be more evident that a person dressed in American clothes was not an immigrant named Uzcadum ?

Incidentally Rose's fiance's name was Cad ......oops sorry......I meant Caledon Hockley, rich heir to Hockley Steel Co. fortune .There was also something in the 1997 film that Hockley Steel supplied some inferior quality steel to Harland and Wolfe which contributed to the failures that sank Titanic.

You can say all you want about the 1953 film, but IMHO Stanwyck and Webb were more accomplished actress/actor than those in the 1997 film.
 
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