Titanic Boat Train

Well, aside from the taxi stand, it seems kind of odd that they would have the mail sorted directly in the station.

I don't think they did that, but depending where they were going, on short trips they were either already sorted and just loaded on board or on longer trips sorted on route (like on Titanic).

I could be wrong about the "Cab Road" use for mail (at the time in 1912) as photos that showed mail vans or trays seemed to date from the 1930's onwards after the station was taken over by Southern.

I have seen other photos of the "Cab Road" also used for queuing as people went on day excursions or trips to Ascot.

sspl_10316146_highres.jpg

(Date Of Photo Unknown)
 

Kas01

Member
At a guess I'd say that the photo was taken in either the immediate postwar era or the Fifties. There's an unmodified Bulleid Pacific at the far right, framed between the third and fourth train shed pillars.
 
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Hi Harland,

The clue is in the short platform roads having no run round facilities. I agree with your research conclusions. I used Waterloo a lot for a period of 15 years, but I never took much notice of these sort of details, and the cab road you refer to had long gone by the 1980s. Paddington had similar cab roads which I just about remember.

You might find the Nat Pres forum useful for any information. I won't tread on your toes by posting a thread about all this on there, and will leave it to you! Kas01 might like to do the same with regard to motive power

National Preservation

Cheers,
Julian
 
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Thank you for the link. So you agree it is Platform 11 or Platform 10? I don't understand what you mean by "run round facilities" (unless you mean the points that allow the train to swap ends for the return journey?)
 
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Aaron_2016

Former Member
On a related note: The boat train was mentioned in the popular TV drama 'Upstairs Downstairs' when Lady Marjorie and her maid travel from London to Southampton on April 10th 1912.


Skip to 43:20



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I don't think they didending where they were going, on short trips they were either already sorted and just loaded on board or on longer trips sorted on route (like on Titanic).

I could be wrong about the "Cab Road" use for mail (at the time in 1912) as photos that showed mail vans or trays seemed to date from the 1930's onwards after the station was taken over by Southern.

I have seen other photos of the "Cab Road" also used for queuing as people went on day excursions or trips to Ascot.

View attachment 41419
(Date Of Photo Unknown)
Hello Harland,
I'd just like to chip in with some information of my own, which hopefully will put the platform Debate to bed for once and for all.
IMG_20181124_130459.JPG

in the platform image from April the 10th, behind the 3 parked luggage vans on the left, is the outline of a building underneath the new overall roof.
now, around this time, Waterloo was undergoing a large amount of redevelopment, Basically starting on the east side and gradually working West over a period of years.
in this next image, which is taken just a month later in May 1912, and looking in the opposite direction,
GettyImages-3309051.jpg


that same building is visible in the right-hand background of the photo. it was part of the old station, and in the process of demolition. So, if the platform number in the photo is anything to go by, platforms 3 and 4 are to the right, and then beyond the next two waiting trains would be platform 5, which, from the position of the building on platform, would make this the Boat Train's departure road. this would also correspond correctly to the position of the roof support columns and finial in the April 10th picture. The full length of platform no.6 would presumably have been out of use at this time, due to the rebuilding work, which may account for it being used to stable short van trains.
 
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Something related to this subject, and surprisingly little known, is of the survival of one of the carriages possibly used in the earlier 2nd/3rd class boat train. No.1520 was one of a pair of 3rd class brakes built by the LSWR in 1910, specifically for ocean liner traffic, having an unusually large luggage space and only 4 passenger compartments.
Unfortunately there seems to be no existing proof of the make-up of either of the two boat trains on the 10th of April , but 1510 would have been a prime contender. It is currently fully restored to its original condition, and in regular service on the Bluebell Railway. Here is a picture:
321.jpg
 
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