Titanic Bodies on seabed


Sep 25, 1997
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It's interesting to read the discussions relating to this topic. One thing that I need to constantly remind myself about the Titanic disaster is the violence of it. It was not pretty. The sinking of the Titanic has become glamorized to the point where the sheer terror and unescapable horror of the ship tearing itself apart has been greatly overlooked. Being on the Titanic near the end would be akin to being in the World Trade Centre during its destruction. Descriptions such as Yuri's and the case of cabin E162 are fascinating. I've often thought of what I would do and where I would be during the Titanic's demise, but Yuri's post reinforces my belief that I would definitely want to jump off the ship before the end. All very interesting yet spine tingling at the same time.

Jason.
 
May 8, 2001
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Jason. Hindsight is 20/20. We all have probably played the senario out in our minds a thousand times to find the answer that satisfies and comforts us, but in real life you have but one chance and no prior knowledge of what the others will do in their own panic, or what everyone exactly did in the last moments to avoid the pitfalls if you ummm "Time traveled" back there. What worked in one situation, does not work in another. Take the Britanic for example. Those that were in lifeboats and jumped in the water when the Captain, unknowingly, tried to turn and head for shore "were drawn in and cut to ribbons" (as one survivor stated it.)

Yuri. See if I read YOUR posts again before bed time!
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May 5, 2001
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"Thank you for that fine forensic evidence Mr. Singleton"
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, good thing you don't need to test your theory eh? hehehehehehehehehe.. .we like you just where you are......

Regards,
Bill
 
May 5, 2001
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Jason said:
It's interesting to read the discussions relating to this topic. One thing that I need to constantly remind myself about the Titanic disaster is the violence of it. It was not pretty. The sinking of the Titanic has become glamorized to the point where the sheer terror and unescapable horror of the ship tearing itself apart has been greatly overlooked. Being on the Titanic near the end would be akin to being in the World Trade Centre during its destruction.
==================== ==================== ========

Hi Jason,
While the death of Titanic was extremely destructive in force and no doubt visually distressing, I am wondering, based on your comments, which would be worse?

Having about 225 ft of an 882 ft long ship come crashing down on you after it broke off of the bow
or being somewhere on a lower floor of the World Trade Center when the floors came pancaking down on top of each other?

While being crushed by the tail end of a 66,000 ton ship is quite traumatic, the WTC disaster still has not yielded close to 2,000 bodies...Where did they go?

Well they have tens of thousands of body parts they need to examine but for the rest of the body?.....Pulverized ........Akin to putting them all in a giant hydraulic press and crushing them till there isn't anything left but dust....this is what I believe happened to the WTC victims, well most of them anyways, I suspect most of them were dust in the wind when the buildings collapsed.

Regards,
Bill
 

Don Tweed

Member
May 5, 2002
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Graphic and terrible William but Oh! so true.
The poor souls in the WTC, on the floors above impact, probably knew time was running out for them. Their deaths, the ones unscathed from the impact, came suddenly.

How will the WTC disaster be looked at 90 years from now? Will there be a WTC society? People not yet born trying to decipher why it happened, and how it could have been prevented? Collectibles being bought and sold online?
I know it sounds a little gruesome now, but 80, 90 years from now? Only time will tell.

Just throwin' it out there!, Don
 
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John Meeks

Guest
Actually, I think it's quite possible - and quite rightly so.

The mere fact that we're discussing this right now; the mere fact that the question has been raised, would indicate that, yes - an impact upon society has been made - and it probably isn't going to go away for a long time.

Regards all,

John M
 
J

John Meeks

Guest
P.S. to my previous posting...

My Birthday is September 11th.....

Does that make me biased?

John M
 

Don Tweed

Member
May 5, 2002
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Hey John, My daughters Kindergarten teachers birthday is Sept 11th also. What a sad day to share your birthday with.

Michael, About that tanning process. I always found it kind of ironic that the main chemical used is "tanic" acid!

All the best, Don
 

Dave Hudson

Member
Apr 25, 2001
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Don,

"How will the WTC disaster be looked at 90 years from now? Will there be a WTC society? People not yet born trying to decipher why it happened, and how it could have been prevented? Collectibles being bought and sold online?"

Will weddings take place at ground zero? Only time will tell.

Controversially,

David
 
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sue cooper

Guest
"Will weddings take place at ground zero? Only time will tell"

Does anyone know if any other weddings have taken place at the site of the Titanic wreck? I remember one last year...and was disgusted... but have heard of no others since.

As for ground zero being used for weddings, well nothing would surprise me. People who choose locations such as the Titanic wreck to get married must be sick. But they do. So someone having a wedding at ground zero one day in the future will come as no great shock. Anthing for publicity with these types of people.

Sue
 
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brendan kilmartin

Guest
I don't think these people are doing this out of bad taste-that is not intentionally.Howeve r i think this sort of interest does take the human fascination of disasters to the extreme.
When something as apauling as september 11th occured we all showed shock and sadness in the events that unfolded, but hand on heart, how many of us can say we watched the news reports solely out of concern and worry for those people trapped and killed? The nature of our being is to be fascinated by all the details of that fateful day, to be fascinated in disasters and accidents.It's not that i think we have a macabre interest in these events, more we are gripped by all things of huge proportion that will go down in history as the greatest tragedies of our lifetime.
I suppose knowing when you've crossed the bad-taste threshold .ie. going too far is something alot of people seem to have trouble with.
So in my long winded way i guess i am agreeing with you!
regards...brendan
 
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sue cooper

Guest
I see where you are coming from, Brendan. And I guess you're right. It is human nature to be interested in disasters. After all, that's why we're here at this particular site, isn't it?! The fascination with what happened on that fateful night 90 years ago. In a way that's a good thing as it ensures that these things will never be forgotten.

Take care,
Sue
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Brendan, I think you may have hit the nail on the head with this one.

Regarding bad taste, I suppose that's very much a subjective matter of opinion. I thought that couple getting married within eyeball distance of the Titanic's bow was way over the top, but at 20 to 30 thousand dollars for a single dive, you can bet they paid for the priviledge.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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sue cooper

Guest
Out of scientific interest, does anyone know just what would have happened if something had gone terribly wrong on Ballard's dive and the sub had broken up. What effects would the water pressure have had on him at that depth?
Crazy question, I know, as I am aware that at that depth it is not possible for a human to survive. I just wondered about the effects of water pressure on people at great depths.

Sue
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Sue, they would have been crushed in a few milliseconds. They would have been dead befor they even realized they had an accident. If the pressure sphere had survived, it would have meant slow suffocation on the bottom with no hope of rescue. Not a very pleasant scenerio.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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brendan kilmartin

Guest
A human implosion would be something i wouldn't want to happen to my worst enemy...the water pressure would be so vast no human containing any air would survive.If you think about marine parks with their underwater walkways and the dense plastics used to prevent fracture from the water then think about 2 1/2 miles of ocean depth, then you get the idea how much pressure there would be.

regards...brendan
 
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sue cooper

Guest
Michael, Brendan, thank you both. I had an idea that human cavities, such as lungs, ears, sinuses and such like, would implode but I wasn't a hundred percent sure that the body would actually be crushed. No, it isn't a very pleasant scenario at all. Amazing what water can do though, isn't it? Stand on a sandy beach and look at the ocean and you'd never dream that it could be so cruel.

Warmest regards to you both,
Sue
 
May 5, 2001
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Don Tweed said:
Graphic and terrible William but Oh! so true.
The poor souls in the WTC, on the floors above impact, probably knew time was running out for them. Their deaths, the ones unscathed from the impact, came suddenly.

How will the WTC disaster be looked at 90 years from now? Will there be a WTC society? People not yet born trying to decipher why it happened, and how it could have been prevented? Collectibles being bought and sold online?
I know it sounds a little gruesome now, but 80, 90 years from now? Only time will tell.
==================== ===================
Hi Don,
To quote the line from a James Cameron film:
"In a hundred years, who'll care?"
Who knows, in one hundred years, perhaps no one will...our society might be completely apathetical by then and not care what happened a century or two before....a shame since most of what happened a century or two before, shaped the way they will live then.

Regards,
Bill
 

Don Tweed

Member
May 5, 2002
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Here! Here! Brendan!!! Well said old man
happy.gif
,Think of the five year old child today that will marry in twenty years, his/her father, killed twenty years ago in the WTC disaster. He/She really never knew his/her father , yet, wants to uphold the memory of his/her father.

Sue, how can this be disgusting? Just asking.

The child has earned the right to honor his father in his own way. Maybe, he was a firefighter or police officer.

To be more precise, as long as someone does not earn a buck or minimize the overall importance of the tragedy, is it wrong?

Are we not on this web page now discussing the matter?

It is human interest I think, and comes from caring.

That is why I think we are researching the subject now.

Just me talking
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, Don
 

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