Titanic Bodies on seabed


Erik Wood

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Aug 24, 2000
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James said: The whole topic of salvagers and personal items being "salvaged" (savaged?) from the debris is one that tends to bring out language in me that would likely get me banned from this message board, so all I will say is that I am appalled at the things done by the salvagers. }

As Moderator I would like to thank you for your choice of words. LOL!!!!
 
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Tom Pappas

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That is an almost verbatim quote from George "would you buy a used car from this man" Tulloch.
 

Eric Paddon

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Jun 4, 2002
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I won't defend that remark, but as far as the broader scheme of things goes with regard to whoppers told in the salvage controversy, nothing will ever top:

"Worst of all the crows nest is gone, undoubtedly in the act of getting at the telephone."

Just my two cents.
 
Nov 23, 1996
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Posted on Saturday, 22 February, 2003 - 7:42 am:

>>"I won't defend that remark, but as far as the broader scheme of things goes with regard to whoppers told in the salvage controversy, nothing will ever top:"

"Worst of all the crows nest is gone, undoubtedly in the act of getting at the telephone." <<

Just my two cents.

Once I can find the link to the large write-up on the crow's nest and the telephone issue that was written by Matt Tulloch and Roy M. I will post it. As it was on the RMS Titanic web-site prior to the take over by Arnie Geller and company.

It will clear up this old issue in great detail about the crow's nest and the telephone which was recovered from the debris field. As shown in Illustrations and video.

To sum it up if I remember correctly the crow's nest was damaged during the sinking, and most likely fell off as result of a cable being cut to access the area near the ships name for the purpose of getting a good illustration of the name on the bow of the ship. The cable if I remember correctly had to be cut so that the rusticles could be swept off the hull to find the name. This sweeping of the hull is also shown in video. The cable can be seen laying across the crow's nest in the 1985-1986 Ballard National Geographic Illustrations. The one thing you also don't see in these Illustrations is the bell.

As for the used car salesmen crack, yes I would buy a car from Mr. Tulloch, as he owned and operated the largest BMW dealership in Connecticut.

"Just my two cents"

No further comments on the issue of salvage other then to post the link once I find it, If it still available.
 

Eric Paddon

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Jun 4, 2002
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I don't have the summary but I do have downloaded on my computer the photos of the phone lying on the ocean floor before it was recovered.

I think what caused a lot of the misinformation to get started was because there were some people in RMSTI who after recovery of the bell and phone, made the wrong assumption that they originally came from the crows nest, which then got picked up on by Ballard and company to indicate that they were ripped out of the crows nest itself (though in Ballard's case he should have known better if he'd bothered to look at his own photos).
 
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Tom Pappas

Guest
In re owning and operating the largest of something as a measure of reliability: Enron. WorldCom. Global Crossing.

I have been aware of Mr. Tulloch's history for a good many years, and I stand by my comment.
 

Don Tweed

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May 5, 2002
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When is it wrong to salvage, plunder, scavenge?
How long must you wait before unearthing or bringing up from the deep historical artifacts?
The gray area is huge and we all fall on different sides of the issue.
It's a double edged sword for me. I relish the time I viewed the artifacts, yet it kind of pained me that they were not left where they came to rest 90 some years ago.
Really hard to say.
-Don
 
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Jonathan Craig Adcock

Guest
The likelyhood of bodies being found, or remains for that matter is none. The Ph level at that depth is around 4 like stomach acid, and would eat bone in a matter of weeks. As for the ship, it may only stand a few more years before it's own weight crushes it.
 

Eric Paddon

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Jun 4, 2002
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"How long must you wait before unearthing or bringing up from the deep historical artifacts?"

There is not and should be no fixed date to apply this standard. It entirely depends on the event itself and whether or not it is already deemed essential from the standpoint of its impact on history, and the accessibility factor to the artifacts in question.

That the passage of time can not be fixed was borne out during the Ground Zero recovery efforts in which numerous museums were allowed to take artifacts for displays pertaining to Ground Zero. This even included objects such as the battered remains of a NYC fire truck. In this instance, the point was that the need was there to act quickly.

With Titanic, the amount of time was dictated solely by our ability to reach the site and once it was reached, it was essential IMO to begin a recovery process. For me, there is nothing extra about an artifact "lying where it was" as opposed to being put in a preserved setting for people to see more up close and in detail in ways that a photo can not convey and I have never had any regard for the argument that a teacup is somehow more special lying on the ocean floor then being preserved to see up close with one's own eyes.
 

Bjh Ham

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Jul 13, 2018
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Hello everyone. I am new here so please be gentle with me!
I found this fantastic site by accident and would just like to congratulate everyone involved for such a knowledgeable and friendly forum.
Now, here's my question:
I know that it is impossible for divers to explore the wreck of the Titanic without submersibles due to the enormous water pressure down there. I am wondering what effect this pressure would have had on the bodies of those unfortunates who went down with the ship.

Thank you in advance and once again congratulations on this wonderful site.

Sue
A bit gruesome to consider, but the victims would have succumbed to one of two scenarios.
1) If they were trapped somewhere inside the hull, the air filled cavities would have collapsed under the imense water pressure envelopping them. Every cell, including blood also contains air. This would have been compressed also, to the point of disintergrating implosion releasing the air in the process.
2) As any fan of criminal forensics, or diving, or swimming would know.... If you where not trapped inside the hull, and / or weighted down, you would simply float....never EVER reaching the bottom as even bones contain air. (If all else was ignored and a free diver wanted to reach that depth, the wieght belt would have to be impossibly heavy for the diver to stand up and walk to the edge of the boat to enter the water....ignoring this the speed of decent would rip off all og their gear on the way down as with plane crash victims and sky scrapper fall victims)

The victims that were never found either:
A) were trapped inside and where totally pulverised from implosive pressure...turning instantly into a wet pulp dust
B) died from the cold and or drowning and later consumed by sea life.

The shoes that have been photographed on the sea bed were once upon a time inside lugguage. Most likely cheap hemp sack cloth baggage that a poor migrant would most likely have brought onboard. This luguage having years ago deteriorated, leaving behingd the highly treated, by virtue of manufacturing process, rot resistant leather.

Victims that died on the surface would have floated way too far from the wreck site to be found and or associated with this disaster.

So No! NO "intact" or percievable as a human would have come anywhere close to landing on the sea bed.

However, the shoes...knowing now, that they were probably inside a poor imigrants cheap hemp bag still smashes home the sadness of this whole avoidable horrible disater in so many ways.
 
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Cam Houseman

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Jul 14, 2020
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Free diving inside Titanic would be a very, very dangerous activity. ROV's will always be the best way to explore the wreck, even if the technology to free dive that deep were to come about. Its just a matter of safety.

Now a Virtual Reality ROV that would allow you to virtually dive inside Titanic might be possible someday in the not too distant future. But then you have to weight the value of such an adventure against the possibility of causing uneccesary damage to the wreck. But if your quest is to see human remains inside the wreck, I wouldn't bet the farm on finding any.

However, that said, its still not impossible for there to be a location somewhere inside the wreck where a body is still located. Somehow preserved by being covered with grease or something. (Yes, I'm really reaching here. I know the odds against such a thing are very high.)

But at least it is 'possible'. However unlikely.

Yuri
Titanic VR intensifies
 

Auden G Minor

I am a Titanic enthusiest!
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Sep 8, 2020
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I know that Engineer Shepard suffered a violent death in boiler room 5 when the bulkhead failed. This after he had just broken his leg.

Even though the bow section sank slowly, there was plenty of destruction going on that would cause injury or death to people. Falling funnels, snaping cables, not to mention the aggressive actions of other people who had panicked. So I would think that probably everyone that died in the bow section also suffered a violent death. That is because unless a violent event occurred to stop someone from moving aft, everyone should have escaped the bow section. Especially the forecastle. Those that met their end below decks in the bow were ultimatly stopped from escape by something terrible. Just like the engineers in boiler room 5.

As far as bodies making the trip to the bottom in the bow section, I think it would depend on where in the bow section the body was located. It seems that there was more destruction caused by rushing water the farther aft. So bodies located nearer the tear in the bow section would have seen similar fates as those in the stern section.

There may have been areas in the forecastle that would have allowed some bodies to remain intact and undisturbed for the ride to the bottom. But again, I think everyone made it out of this area before the bow sank.

Yuri
Hello there you all! I would like to tell Yuri that Shepard probably got out of boiler room 5. I read in a post that there was even an account of him on the stern! Thank you and have a good day!
 

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