Titanic chronology


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Addison Hart

Guest
Titanic chronology2

Here is the start of this year's chronology (ends April 15th). It's revised and expanded as promised.

God bless,
Addison
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Day 1, April 1st, 1912.

Monday, April 1st, 1912, was a cool, crisp morning for the old Irish shipping city of Belfast. A northwesterly wind was whipping up and heading toward the region, making the atmosphere feel wet that day though there was, in fact, no rain in the Belfast area. It was hoped, however, that this wind would not make it difficult for the magnanimous event that was scheduled for the docks that morning. That morning, the second ship of the old and venerable White Star Line’s ‘Olympic Class’ series, namely the Royal Mail Steamer Titanic, would be making her sea-trials, before heading to the English port city of Southampton. The ‘Big Three’, as the Olympic Class vessels were called, were a series of triplet ships, larger than any ship built at any earlier time. These ships were built to be the finest in the shipping industry, outranking in quality most hotels. They were not only built to be fast, but most importantly they were built to be luxurious. Titanic was the largest of the vessels built so far, though it was the second to be built and launched (it had been launched on the 31st day of May in 1911). It was also, by all standards, the most luxurious. Though the Olympic (Titanic’s older sister) was not as large, it was better advertised, as it was, after all, the first of the three. But still, the owners of R.M.S. Titanic expected to turn a great profit from this sailing.

The Titanic was scheduled to start her trials on the River Lagan at precisely 10 o’clock a.m. that morning. She was to be occupied and controlled by a skeleton crew of 79 crewmembers, who had signed on for the voyage on Saturday, March 29th. Besides these men (all of them the trimmers or stokers or boilermen) there were aboard 41 officers, engineers, and stewards. At about 9:00 a.m. the tugs from Liverpool (all made by the Alexandra Towing Company, and several already familiar with the new ship as they had assisted at the launch) arrived, and started to steam towards Titanic’s berth, ready to assist her in her trials. At 10 o’clock, as scheduled, she slipped into the River Lagan, where she was greeted by the tugs. Unfortunately, as the giant vessel steamed towards the Victoria Channel, her crew found that the wind was making things too difficult for her to do much of anything, and so she was quickly sent back to Belfast, where she would rest for the remainder of the day. The wind and the narrow confines of the Lagan had proven too dangerous a combination for the new ship, and it would certainly be best to wait for better weather, so as not to risk damage to the ship before she even made a single Trans-Atlantic crossing. Hopefully there would be better conditions on the 2nd.

Engineers and officers alike used the rest of the day to give the ship a final examination. They also took the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the ship. The trimmers, the fireman (at the time there was only one actual fireman aboard, that man was Mr. William McQuillan), the officers, able seamen, and the “Black Gang” (the Engineers and Boilermen) were paid an extra five shillings for the delay.
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(Message edited by addisonhart on April 1, 2002)

(Message edited by addisonhart on April 1, 2002)
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Great post. Only one minor nit to pick, in that the Olympics were never designed to try and capture the Blue Ribband. This prize was for the ship that made the fastest crossing. White Star instead put the emphisis on comfort and luxury.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Addison Hart

Guest
Aacccckkk! You are quite right, thank you, Michael. I shall not make such a mistake next year.

God bless,
Addison
 
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Brandon R. Whited

Guest
Addison,

I always enjoy your chronologies, and I believe that this one is looking to be the best yet! You're a very talented writer. Keep it up!


Cheers,
happy.gif


-B.W.
 
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Addison Hart

Guest
Day 2, April 2nd, 1912

Tuesday, April 2nd, 1912 was a calm and mild day, perfect for the trials and the voyage to Southampton that had been scheduled for the 1st, but had been postponed due to the bad weather. That morning, the eight senior officers of Titanic had boarded. Senior Commander Edward John Smith, RNR, the 'Commodore' of the White Star Line, old ‘EJ’, the venerable and beloved 62 year old who had lived old much of his life at sea, was to be the new ship’s captain. In all his years at sea he had never been involved in a shipwreck, the closest he’d come to one had been the 1911 incident with Olympic, the Titanic’s older sister ship, which had been accidentally struck by the warship H.M.S. Hawke while leaving Southampton. Luckily, no lives were lost, and there were only minor injuries to the few people who were in the sections of the ships that rammed, and so Smith’s reputation as a fine captain was undamaged.

Along with the great Captain Smith, there were seven lesser officers aboard. These men were: the superb Scottish seaman, Chief Officer William McMasters Murdoch, RNR, then the famed First Officer Charles Herbert Lightoller, RNR, Second Officer David Blair, Third Officer Herbert John Pitman, Fourth Officer Joseph Groves Boxhall, Fifth Officer Harold Godfrey Lowe (a Welshman), RNR, and Sixth Officer James Paul Moody. 34 seamen and 79 trimmers, firemen, etc. also boarded the liner that morning. There was also a change of plans in store for Titanic’s owners and officers. Captain Smith had brought along the trustworthy Henry Tingle Wilde, Olympic’s chief officer in all Smith’s voyages on her. Smith intended to have Wilde placed as Chief Officer, and this was done. Murdoch was thus bumped down to First Officer and Lightoller to second, but there were no other changes in the officer’s roster. Poor Davey Blair then had to leave, taking with him the knowledge of where Titanic’s pair of binoculars was stored. Also present that day were the two wireless officers from the Marconi firm, Chief Operator Jack Phillips and Assisting Operator Harold Bride.

Also present that morning on Titanic were some of the men responsible for her. Her owner, the founder of International Mercantile Marine (IMM), millionaire J. Pierpont Morgan, was unable to be present (he had been present at the launch), high-ranking members of White Star and Harland & Wolff (the Belfast-based shipbuilding firm that constructed Titanic and her sisters for White Star) were present, with the exception of the White Star Line’s Chairman, and leading IMM officer Joseph Bruce Ismay, who was not present. Ismay reported his absence as being due to family matters. Lord William James Pirrie was also absent due to a very severe case of pneumonia that left him constantly covered in towels with his feet soaking in a basin of hot water. Both Ismay and Pirrie sent their replacements, Harold Sanderson and Thomas Andrews Jr., respectively. Sanderson was second in command of the White Star, and Andrews was the nephew of his Lordship, as well as the designer of Titanic. Accompanying Andrews was his chief deputy, Edward Wilding.

Things started very early that morning with an inspection by Board of Trade supervisor Francis T. Carruthers. Captain Smith and other members of the crew and the companies accompanied him. Messrs. C. J. Smith & Co. of London place several members of their firm aboard to adjust the ship’s compasses as she entered the open water. At 6:00 o’clock a.m. the trials started. The four tugs began pulling the huge ship along the River Lagan, through the Victoria Channel towards the Belfast Lough. The Herald was at her port bowlines, the Haskinson was at her port lines, the Herculaneum was at her starboard lines, and the Horbury was at her starboard bowlines. They were watched closely by the bo’sun, the Australian Alfred ‘Big Neck’ Nichols and his crew, and bo’sun’s mate Albert Haines and his crew. One by one, deep inside the ship, the 20 immense boilers of Titanic were lit. As the crowds of spectators lined up all along the Channel to watch the ship, Titanic made her way into the Lough for her trials.

At about noon, the tugs took her to a spot in the Lough about two miles off the tiny town of Carrickfergus. The crowds rushed towards the town to watch the ship. As a flag signaling the fact that the pilot was aboard flapped about in the light morning breeze, the tugs released their hold on the ship and returned to Belfast, as Titanic’s three propellers (her ‘triple screws’) spun round for the first time. As a blue and white ‘A’ signal flag indicating that Titanic was undergoing sea trials, was run up, Fourth Officer Boxhall thrust the engine room telegraph handle forward and Titanic moved on it’s own for the very first time. At this time, three long blasts from the ship’s siren were sounded. Buoy tests were now conducted.

During this time, the officers and officials devoured salmon, roast chicken, and sweetbreads in the grand First Class Dining Room on D-Deck. During the meal they compared notes and asked each other technical questions, finally concluding that the ship was running better than expected. At about 2 o’clock, Titanic started making a series of runs across the Lough towards the Irish Sea and then and back to it’s original position. They found that the ship could go past 20 knots, and that she could be brought to a full stop in just over three minutes, a good period of time for a ship of her size. At 6 o’clock p.m. Titanic headed back to the Lough from the Irish Sea at 18 knots so as it could undergo its final inspection before she made her way to Southampton.

Carruthers boarded Titanic for one last experiment, raising and dropping her giant anchors. After several minutes of this, the BoT inspector was satisfied, and he presented Andrews and Wilding with a certificate reading “Good for one year from today 2.4.12.” That night, at 8 o’clock, the engines were once again started up, this time for the voyage to Southampton, where an empty birth was waiting. Aboard, along with the skeleton crew, Carruthers, Andrews, Sanderson, Wilding, Harland & Wolff’s nine-strong ‘Guarantee Group’, and regular 1st Class Passenger Wyckoff van der Hoef enjoyed the ship’s first trip. That evening, the wireless operators were tirelessly sending updates to Morgan and Ismay about the trip towards Southampton. As the darkness fell the regular officer’s watches were held, and lookouts were posted. In the darkness, Titanic rounded the Lizard, passed through the Irish Sea and St. George’s Channel, and headed past the coast of Cornwall.
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(Message edited by addisonhart on April 2, 2002)
 
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Addison Hart

Guest
Brandon, thank you. I do believe you are right, this is the best year's batch yet. I do hope that next year I will have even more additions. Each year I'll have it better.

God bless,
Addison
 
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Addison Hart

Guest
Day 3, April 3rd, 1912

Wednesday, April 3rd, 1912 was mild and chilly. That morning, the 882 ½ foot long White Star liner Titanic cut through the waves towards Southampton from the Irish Sea. She was making towards the city from Belfast after completing her sea-worthiness trials the past day. The trip from Belfast to Southampton was approximately 570 miles. The ship entered a dense fog at 2 o’clock a.m., and the fog would not disperse until 6 o’clock a.m. That morning, the ship’s officers and the officials aboard her sat down to a pleasant breakfast. The menu read thus:

Fruit

Quaker Oats

Fillets of Whiting
Kippered Herrings

Calves’ Liver & Bacon
Grilled Ham or Grilled Sausage
Minced Chicken
Poached & Fried Eggs
Plain & Tomato Omelettes
Mashed & Sauté Potatoes

Cold Meat

Rolls or Scones
Marmalade
Strawberry Conserve
Watercress

At 10:30 a.m. she was 150 miles east of Fastnet. Over the day she would pass Cornwall, Prawle Point, and St. Catherine’s Port. At this time, the ship was moving at 23 ¼ knots, the fastest she would ever move. At about noon she passed the green cliffs of Land’s End, where she made contact over wireless with Teneriffe (2,000m miles away) and Port Said (3,000 miles).

That night she passed the Isle of Wight where she met with the Nab Light vessel, from which Southampton’s old and celebrated harbor pilot, George Bowyer, came aboard. Bowyer had been present on the bridge of Olympic with Captain E.J. Smith during the Hawke incident. The ship entered the Spithead as darkness fell. At 12 o’clock midnight Titanic arrived at the aged British city of Southampton, and was taken forth to the White Star’s dock. Along the way she passed her own sister ship, the Olympic, headed off on a voyage of her own.
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May 8, 2001
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May I add a small footnote here that has been haunting me all day?
Today, April 3rd, many hopeful immigrants from Finland, their bags packed with all their worldly belongings, said goodbye to everything they knew and started their journey towards the United States on a ship called the Polaris. Once docked, from there they would have taken a train from Hull to Southampton, and boarded Titanic.
 
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Andrew Williams

Guest
At 12 o'clock midnight Titanic arrived at the aged British city of Southampton, and was taken forth to the White Star's dock.

Hello Addison,

For given me for saying so, but there are at least two mistakes here.

First:- Titanic's arrival at the port of Southampton....was 1-15am...... on the morning of Tuesday 5th April 1912. I have the entry from the Associated Port's of Southampton amonsgt my possessions.

Second:- Southampton didn't reach city-status until 1965.

Otherwise you doing alright, I have no problems with the rest.

Best wishes

Andrew W.
 
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Andrew Williams

Guest
Addison, I stand corrected, even I got the dates wrong myself.

Titanic's arrival was during the early hours on Tuesday (3rd April 1912) time1-15 am and not the 5th April as I predicted.

Andrew W.
 
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Addison Hart

Guest
Sorry, Andrew, I did not make myself clear. Titanic arrived in the dock at midnight but was not towed into the berth until 1:15.

Thanks Colleen!

God bless,
Addison
 
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Addison Hart

Guest
Day 4, April 4th, 1912

Thursday, April 4th, 1912, Maundy Thursday, was a very important day for the R.M.S. Titanic. Not only had she conquered, in a sense, the narrow confines of the River Lagan and completed successfully her trials, she was now entering the port of Southampton for the preparations for her first Trans-Atlantic voyage. At the exact start of April 4th, at 12:00 a.m. that morning, Titanic was headed straight into the waters of Southampton. The lights on her decks ablaze, few spectators watched as she emerged from the gloomy darkness into the dock of Southampton, guided by the green and red lights of the buoys before her.

At her sides chugged five Red Line tugs, the tugs Ajax, Hector, Hercules, Neptune, and Vulcan, each of the tiny vessels guided by Titanic’s bo’sun, ‘Big Neck’ Nichols and his superb team of able bodied seamen. Berth No. 44 sat empty, awaiting the giant White Star liner. Guided by the tugs (and by the harbor pilot, George Bowyer), Titanic was warped into her berth at about 1:15 a.m.. The dockyard workers had some trouble getting enough space for the ship’s big bulk. Oceanic and New York were berthed ship-by-side in Berths 38 and 39, while across the water from Berth 44 the American Line ships Philadelphia, St. Louis, and White Star’s Majestic all sat tied together.

When the dawn came, a large group of people came down to the quay to see this new ship Titanic, and no one came away unimpressed. The ship appeared with the dawn, towed in during the night, and not at all visible until the morning hours. On this day, many of the officers took the opportunity to become familiar with Titanic. David Blair, the Second Officer who had to leave the ship’s roster when Henry Wilde came in as Chief Officer, got a good look at the ship that he would not sail on as well. He voiced his praise of her in a letter to his sister-in-law. “This is a marvelous ship, and I feel very disappointed I am not to make the first voyage.” Though he was disappointed by the absence of his friend Blair, James Moody, the Sixth Officer, was also impressed with the ship, saying that he was happy to have a room of his own, even despite the fact that it was only the size of a cupboard. First Officer William Murdoch seems to have taken some time examining the ships lifeboats and their Wellin davits. Though he may have taken notice of the fact that the boats could only hold half of the Titanic’s passengers (a fact pointed out by both White Star official Alexander Carlisle and Board of Trade member Ernest Shackleton), the davits impressed him. “I thought what a jolly fine idea they were, because with the old-fashioned davits it would require about a dozen men to life her [the lifeboat], a dozen men at each end.” Not everyone was pleased with the ship, however. Fifth Officer Lowe complained that he was “a stranger to everyone aboard.” Wilde had different problems, he didn’t like the ship at all. It was simply too big.

A large amount of silverware and china was taken aboard the ship this day. There would be, in all, some 2,000 salt shakers, 4,500 breakfast plates, 3,000 tea cups, 5,500 ice cream plates, 12,000 dinner plates, 1,000 finger bowls, and 1,500 mustard bowls aboard, as well as hordes of other assorted bunches of cutlery and plates and dishes. It seemed that the first items to be loaded aboard the doomed vessel were to be the crockery.
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Andrew Williams

Guest
The entry indicates Titanic's docking arrival at 1-15 am, but doesn't give the precise timing when she quietly sailed up the Solent, known as Southampton Water.

Andrew W.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Addison, being one who will not be at a convention this year, I love that you are doing this for all of us. It kinda helps makes us all a part of her journey and helps us to remember.

Great work. Thanks.
Maureen.
 
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Addison Hart

Guest
Day 5, April 5th, 1912

Friday, April 5th, 1912 was Good Friday. Early in the morning, dockyard workers fixed hordes of assorted colored flags and pennants up upon the ship’s rigging. This was done for two reasons: firstly, to honor Holy Week, and secondly, to honor the people of Southampton, Titanic’s ‘hosts’. Today was the only day in her short history that Titanic was ever “dressed”, although some artists like to picture her with these flags and pennants as she leaves the Southampton dock.

As the Bard wrote in Henry V “…the scene is now transported, gentles, to Southampton; there is the playhouse now, there must you sit.” Southampton is located 78 miles southwest of London, in Hampshire. It was always a perfect spot for a port. It is built at the convergence point of the Rivers Test and Itchen, and is protected from severe sea-storms by the ancient Isle of Wight that sits in the waters nearby. There has been a settlement at Southampton since Emperor Claudius invaded Britannia. The White Star Line did not have a dock of it’s own in this city until 1907, when they changed the outlet of their express passenger service from Liverpool (White Star’s headquarters) to Southampton.

Due to Good Friday, the dock was, for the most part, deserted. There were to be no visitors on this holy day. April the 5th would also prove to be the first recruitment day in Southampton for the ship’s crew (though few men actually signed up until the following day). Much of the ship’s cargo was taken aboard the ship on this day as well. At night, the flags were taken down. It had been a relatively inactive day for the Titanic, and indeed for the dockyard, but tomorrow would be very different.
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Addison Hart

Guest
Thanks very much Maureen! Any comments on these posts, criticisms or what-not, are very much appreciated.

God bless,
Addison
 
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Addison Hart

Guest
Day 6, April 6th, 1912

Saturday, April 6th, 1912 was, of course, Holy Saturday. This day was, for Titanic, a much more active day than the previous day, and was to be much more active than anything expected on the next day. Much of the ship’s cargo was brought aboard today — almost 500 tons of it in all — in about 11,524 individual pieces. While this was going on, in the area around Titanic’s Berth 44, dockyard workers scrambled about the port loading more coal (from various shipping and coaling ports) into the ship’s boiler rooms. The process of lugging all this coal to the ship lasted the full 24 hours of the day. After this, with areas of the ship covered in a layer of soot, the ship’s “boots men” (whose jobs were to clean both shoes, and on occasion, the ship herself), led by 34-year-old S. Stebbing were called into action. They cleaned the areas of ship covered by the fine black dust, and apparently did a fine job of it as well.

Today was also the recruitment day for the majority of Titanic’s crew. The White Star’s hiring halls were packed with the seamen, eager to put their names down for a spot on the new ship on her maiden voyage. 228 men came from the British Seafarer’s Union and about 100 men were from the National Sailor’s Union and the Firemen’s Union alone. These men were all eager to get back to work, now that the national coal strike had finally been ended this day due to the hard work of Prime Minister H. H. Asquith.

The trouble had begun on January 12th, 1912, when the coal miners of Britain had voted overwhelmingly to go on strike until they would be allowed to receive minimum wages instead of the pittance they had been receiving as of late. Despite Prime Minister Asquith’s best attempts to make for a peaceful negotiation, the strike began in late February, and, urged on by such socialist political leaders as Ben Tillett (who would later cause grief to White Star about conditions of Titanic’s 3rd Class Passengers), would become increasingly problematic for the shipping industry and the government alike. Despite the settlement on the 6th, large amounts of coal in Southampton would be scarce until about a week after the settlement. The White Star had already announced that the two Olympic Class vessels that would be making voyages this week, Olympic and Titanic would have their usual speed of 23 knots reduced to 20 knots to conserve coal.

Now that the coal strikes were over, the seamen (who had been, since February, struggling to make a living) scrambled to sign on for any available ship, but many wanted Titanic, both because of the magnificent ship herself and her captain, the beloved EJ. The majority of the crewmembers were from Southampton, but there were also men from London, Liverpool, Belfast, and Queenstown. Several important additions were made to Titanic’s crew today. Dr. Edward J. Simpson would be the Assistant Surgeon aboard the ship, working under the careful eye of Chief Surgeon William Francis Norman O’Loughlin, a man every bit as much beloved to passengers and crew alike as Captain Smith himself. A Londoner, Reginald Leonard Barker, signed on as Titanic’s purser, to be paid the sum of 15 pounds per month. He would be demoted to Assistant Purser when yet another popular officer of the White Star, Hugh McElroy, was taken aboard as Chief Purser. White Star also transferred the likable Andrew J. Latimer from Olympic, to be Titanic’s Chief Steward. It seemed that the White Star Line was, in a sense, assembling an ‘all-star cast’ for the Titanic’s high-ranking officers aboard. The cream of the White Star were to be present, this would truly be a voyage to remember.
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Addison Hart

Guest
Day 7, April 7th, 1912

Sunday, April 7th, 1912 was Easter Sunday. Titanic spent her fourth day resting in Berth No. 44 at the White Star dock in Southampton, preparing for her maiden voyage. The tide in Berth 44 was up to a depth of 40 feet above the main tide. The same would be true for Berth 43, which had previously held Titanic’s sister ship Olympic, which had departed Southampton April 4th, the day Titanic arrived. Due to Easter, there was very little activity at the White Star dock, most of the crew was gone as well.

There was no time to send Titanic any newly mined coal, so she was loaded with coal from five other I.M.M. ships, as well as with left over coal from the Olympic. The new ship’s huge boilers had already consumed 415 tons of coal in the last week (mainly to heat the ship and to operate her cargo winches). The ship had arrived in Southampton with 1,880 tons of coal. 4,427 tons of the stuff had been brought aboard in Southampton, mainly on the previous day.

Throughout the day, aboard Titanic, all was peaceful. The dock was completely deserted due to the significance of the day. The only movement on the ship was that of the Blue Ensign that had been hoisted up that evening, which gently fluttered in the breeze. With evening came the lookout, who rang the ship’s bell to mark off the hours.

These were to be the last quiet hours Titanic would ever know.
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Inger Sheil

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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G'day Addison -

I know that Geoffrey Marcus suggests that Moody was disappointed that Blair wasn't going to make the voyage, but I'd question this point. Moody had never served with Blair before the Titanic and (judging from what I've read in his correspondence) didn't know him - he knew Lightoller and Pitman personally having served with them on the Oceanic, but knew Murdoch and Blair only by reputation (although the reports he'd heard about them had been positive). I believe that Marcus misinterpreted a line in one of Moody's letters, believing it referred to Blair.

There is perhaps one source I'm trying to run to earth that may suggest Moody and Blair hit it off well during the short time they served together, but as for any longstanding friendship and great disappointment on Moody's part that Blair was bumped - no.

I felt I had to address this as I have to take responsibility for repeating Marcus' error on our website - since that was written, further research has clarified matters somewhat. Hope it's of some assistance!
 
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Addison Hart

Guest
Day 8, April 8th, 1912

Monday, April 8th, 1912 was rainy and grey. Titanic remained warped in Berth 44 in Southampton’s dock. On this day some 4,427 tons of coal was loaded aboard her, as well as a large amount of the foodstuffs. Seamen still packed the White Star’s hiring halls to reserve a place as a crewman on the newest and largest ship built by White Star, or by any company for that matter. These men applied for positions as Able Seamen, Firemen, Trimmers, Stewards, and many other such tasks. A large group of Europeans from Luigi Gatti’s restaurants in England came down to sign on Titanic to fill the spots needed to run Luigi Gatti’s newest restaurant, the a’la Carte, which was aboard Titanic herself. Over the course of the day, hundreds of crewmembers were added to the ship. Names like Reginald Jones, Alfred Maytum, Thomas Barker, Cyril Ricks, Frank Prentice, Bertram Noss, Charles Joughin, Arthur May, his father A.W. May, were all added to the ship’s roster. 34-year-old Joseph Scarrot joined Titanic’s crew today as an Able Seaman:

“I signed on the ‘articles’ as ‘A.B.’ [Able Seaman] on Monday, April 8th, 1912. The signing on seemed like a dream to me, and I could not believe I had done so, but the absence of my discharge book from my pocket convinced me. When I went to the docks that morning I had as much intention of applying for a job on the Big ‘Un as we called her, as I had of going for a trip to the moon.”

Also, many fresh food supplies were loaded aboard today, including:

75,000 lbs. of Fresh Meat
11,000 lbs. of Fresh Fish
4,000 lbs. of Salted and Dried Fish
75,000 lbs. of Ham and Bacon
25,000 lbs. of Poultry and Game
2,500 lbs. of Sausage
40,000 lbs. of Fresh Eggs
2,200 lbs. of Coffee
1,120 lbs. of Jams and Marmalade
1,000 Sweetbreads
800 lbs. of Tea
10,000 lbs. of Rice, Dried Beans, etc.
10,000 lbs. of Sugar
200 barrels of Flour
10,000 lbs. of Cereals
36,000 (180 boxes of) Oranges
16,000 (50 boxes of) Lemons

Also:

25 cases of Biscuits
1,750 quarts of Ice Cream
1,196 bags of Potatoes
6 cases of Confectionery
22 cases of Mushrooms
3 cases of Tea
10 cases of Mixed Vegetables
225 cases of Mustard
8,000 cigars

And to drink:

20,000 bottles of Beer and Stout
1,500 bottles of Wine
15,000 bottles of Mineral Waters
850 bottles of Spirits

The meat and produce was put into large refrigerators on G-Deck. Officers Murdoch and Lightoller supervised the taking of this food down to where it was to be placed. The Refrigerators were to be watched over and tended by Extra Assistant 4th Engineer Thomas Hulman Kemp.

Last minute details were overseen by Titanic’s designer Thomas Andrews, who made another of his routine inspections of the ship at 6:30 p.m. before returning to the Harland & Wolff office to prepare for the coming voyage. Andrews tireless wandered the ship in the last two days before the voyage, followed by his secretary Thomas Hamilton. Andrews inspected every bit of the ship, and was busy noticing what definantly had to be changed before the next trip. There were too many screws, for example, in stateroom hat hooks. The restaurant galley hot press wasn’t working correctly, either. It would definantly have to be replaced before the next voyage.
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