Titanic COULD be raised A Matter of fact


Apr 20, 2007
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I know Titanic people are split on the issue of Titanic's raising off the Atlantic' abyss, and on whether it SHOULD or should NOT be attempted.

That argument put aside, I think that, in a certain way, it is almost logical to say that mankind will be ABLE TO RAISE THE TITANIC.

As for the question of the capability, I think the answer is overwhelmingly positive.
You must be thinking I'm nuts, correct?

But think about this, with a clear, non-side taking mind:
Over less than a century AGO, Men said it was impossible for humans to dive into the depths of the ocean. But, in TIME, Humans made machines that made it possible to dive and navigate in the deepest of Oceans, right?
Now, can you imagine, trying to convince a man living in 1940--- as logical as that man may be--- that less than 50 something years from his time, man could and would navigate in submersibles in the Ocean depths? You'd be hospitalized!

Therefore, the same applies on us. I think if someone from the future could come to tell us, he would admit that technology in the future had got to THAT POINT, where the raising of the COMPLETE TITANIC wreck is POSSIBLE.

Understand, I am NOT worshipping technology. Actually, I'm NOT even a technological man, I would say (I'm a comics artist).
And God knows, Titanic is proof enough for convincing anyone to not trust in technology blindly...
But, what I'm saying, that if you consider the issue logically, and take into account that technology is always ON THE RISE (even and especially in our half of the Century)-- then you come to the conclusion, that technology to ACTUALLY RAISE THE TITANIC is, in fact, nearer than any of us may be imagining.

And "then", my Ladies and Gentlemen, would we be forced to contemplate and DECIDE on the "SHOULD" of this controversial issue--- because the "COULD" of the question, will by that time, be a thing of the past.
 
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The wreck is broken apart, highly corroded- even if you did get the main sections to the surface, they would start to rapidly deteriorate from exposure to the air...
Raising smaller sections that can be treated, like the 'Big Piece' are possible, but raising the whole thing couldn't happen....
She would crumble apart before even reaching the surface....

Plus IF the bow and stern sections were raised- then what? You'd literally have to disassemble the entire ship and treat every individual beam and rivet to stop the corrosive process- a feat that would cost more than the raisng itself...



regards


tarn Stephanos
 
Apr 20, 2007
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Granted, Tarn. Thanks for your comments.

But, suffice to say, if the time were to come (maybe even in our OWN lifetimes) that technology would so much advance to make the raising of the Titanic a possibility--- THEN they (whoever will be raising the Ship)-- will also find solutions to the very correct matters you talk about.

Well, yeah, this is kind of (maybe) giving "too much credit" to technology... But then yet again, consider: That if you had said to someone in 1963 that a time will come when you'll be talking and also seeing the person you're talking with on the cell-phone--- your ideas would had seemed COMPLETELY FAR-FETCHED to that person, and well... quite imaginary.

I don't know... Maybe, in the end you are right, Tarn.
But there's always that "Then again..." issue whenever technology is involved, you know, Tarn?

Technology is haughty (it always was. To a fault at many a times), and it (at most times) likes to prove the impossible as possible. As if proving a rise to a challenge... Sometimes technology succeeds.

Anyway, think about it... I mean, just on the imaginative (imagination running wild) side of it... I mean: WOH.
That would be the day, huh?

I mean, "She comes."
"She arrives at New York harbor... All those years (a whole, complete Century) after that (supposed) arriving time of Wednesday 17th 1912..."

Man, it gives me goose bumps just imagining that.

What I think, is that even IF possible, the Titanic would not be raised--- such would be the AGREED CHOICE, because the Titanic will not have her legacy, her morals will not be that effective, if the ship were to come to her dock in New-York, a Century later.

In Titanic's case, IF the story is complete, the story--- the legacy, the hard learned lesson to humanity--- is no-more.

In 1912 Titanic was a Ship.
Her wreck is an everlasting symbol, for humankind to derive thier lessons from.
It is sad.
But that is the power of the wreck, lying broken on the Atlantic sea-floor.
 

John Clifford

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quote:

I mean, just on the imaginative (imagination running wild) side of it... I mean: WOH.
That would be the day, huh?

I mean, "She comes."
"She arrives at New York harbor... All those years (a whole, complete Century) after that (supposed) arriving time of Wednesday 17th 1912..."
And I am sorry to have to be the one to "burst the bubble", but the cost factors, alone, would be prohibitive. Even if portions of the ship were raised, then the question is "what, then"?
The Big Piece ended up being cut in two pieces, and one of the pieces, to me, was not that impressive, and it showed signs of deterioration (small shards come off when the piece was touched, as no security personnel were present at the Atlantic City Tropicana), two years after the full piece was recovered.

Also, even if future technology will make salvage of sunken vessels possible, I doubt that the Titanic will be a chosen vessel, due to the depths and time underwater, as Tarn has noted.

No, the North Atlantic seabed is the permanent resting place for the Titanic; sorry if this appears too cliched.​
 
Apr 20, 2007
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Yeah, John. I actually agree with you.

The point which I wanted to put across is that, what seems to us IMPOSSIBLE today is so "only" today. That's what all these people who rule out any option of raising the Titanic, the minute the idea is suggested--- need to understand.

Technology could, one day, render this possible.
IF it would be the right thing to do: commercially, physically, financially and most importantly MORALLY and ethically, is the far more difficult issue to answer to.

What I think is that, it is more of a moral issue, rather than a physical one.
IF they could? SHOULD THEY?

But, John, one has to admit though, that deep down, in-spite of all the problems and the physical improbabilities and what-not, every Titanic buff such as ourselves, in some time or another--- does imagine such a day... when the Titanic DOES reach the "White Star Line" pier in New-York Harbor...

It's hard even to conjure up, how such a day would had been accepted. With what a mixture of feelings...
 

John Clifford

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quote:

But, John, one has to admit though, that deep down, in-spite of all the problems and the physical improbabilities and what-not, every Titanic buff such as ourselves, in some time or another--- does imagine such a day... when the Titanic DOES reach the "White Star Line" pier in New-York Harbor...

It's hard even to conjure up, how such a day would had been accepted. With what a mixture of feelings...
Solomon, my thoughts on such a scenario only came to mind after reading the arrival scene in "Raise the Titanic". That chapter, if fully portrayed, would have been a great addition to the film version.

Actually I never thought of such a scenario, by myself. It was a fantastic moment when I first heard the ship was found, on September 1, 1985.
However, once it was discovered that the ship is resting in two pieces the idea of a complete salvage, to me, was determined to be impossible.

Your scenario would have been realized IF, in my own opinion, and mine alone, the people from RMSTI had brought the Big Piece directly to New York.
That was not done, as the plan was to get it to the Boston Exhibit, ASAP.

As there are no other thoughts about recovering other parts of the ships, the "dream" of witnessing the ship arriving at the Chelsea Piers is just that.​
 
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>>But think about this, with a clear, non-side taking mind:<<

I prefer to think of it with a very critical mind, weighing the pros and cons, and taking into account the difficulties which go along with salvage. While it's conceivable that some bright laddie or lassie may come up with a way, the fact is that nobody, and I do mean nobody, is going to attempt such a wildly expensive venture without one helluva compelling economic incentive to do so.

Beyond sentimentality, there is no real reason to even think of attempting to raise the wreck, and some quite overwhelming reasons not to. The damage done to what's left of the ship would destroy any evidence which would help us better understand what happened, how it happened, and why.

All else aside, what would be the point in bringing to the surface a pile of metal so badly corroded that it wouldn't be fit for anything but scrap?

Face the facts: It ain't gonna happen.
 
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Paul Rogers

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Hey! I've heard they're gonna build an exact replica! That would be really cool!!!111eleventy!!! LOL
happy.gif
 

Bob Godfrey

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Paul, if you're interested I'm looking for a financial adviser for my motion picture project Rebuild the Titanic. We won't need to lower the Atlantic for this one, so we're hoping that Lew Grade will take it on. He'll need to be raised from the dead, of course, but with an eleventy billion dollar budget anything is possible.
 
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Paul Rogers

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Except for me, Bob. Except for me.

By the way, I've got a fantastic investment opportunity for a discerning client like yourself. All you have to do is take out a "Self-Amortizing loan!" Let's say you need £100m to finance this new film. Take out a loan for £500m and only spend £100m of it. Put the other £400m into an interest-earning savings account. Then use the £400m plus interest to pay back the £100m you actually spent!

My fee will be 2.5% of the loan drawdown amount. Cash only, please, and I'll knock off the VAT. Please keep this to yourself or everyone will be doing it!
 
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Bob Godfrey

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I've tried your financial top tips before, Paul. That's why I now have so much time to spend posting on ET. I'm out on probation next month, but only on the strict understanding that I don't associate with you.
 
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May 2, 2000
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Doesn't exist today a robot like the Pathfinder (the one that went to Mars) that could be able to be for a year into the Titanic taking photos of the interior of the ship, a wireless robot that could send information to the surface and could discover all the remainings items.?
 
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Matt Pereira

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Sandro that is a possibility but the problem with that, is you would have to use a floating robot but then what happens if you dont have a life to the second video feed you could run into something and lose the rov. Might be possible but would take lots of work. I think they have a rov that they can lower over the side of a ship and never use a submersible
 
Mar 3, 2001
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I fail to see any practical reason behind raising the ship. We've already got technology that is taking us deeper and deeper inside (turkish bath comes to mind) and it's developing a lot quicker than the technology to raise and preserve her ever would. Regardless, there is one thing to take into consideration. By the time the cutting edge technology to raise the mammoth ship came to be - would there be anything left of her to raise?
 
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>>By the time the cutting edge technology to raise the mammoth ship came to be - would there be anything left of her to raise?<<

In my opinion, no. In point of fact, little effort is being made towards that end because there's little point in bringing up an entire hull from a point so deep that it poses no danger to navigation.

There's another problem which is never considered by anyone entertaining this fantasy in that even if bringing the ship up was possible...and the cold facts are that it's not...doing so would be destructive in the extreme of archaeological context.

You don't remove the corpus kaput from the crime scene until the detectives get there to document everything which could tell what, how, and why things happened as they did, you don't stir up the ship's grave for the same reason. You lose more evidence, often crucial evidence, then what you would gain.
 
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What's the point of raising the Titanic? She has far greater impact resting at the spot where she dropped on April 15, 1912. Even if you did manage to bring up her bow, it would fragment in the process- and even if it held together- all you would walk away with would be highly corroded scrap metal. The entire ship would need to be disassembled down to the rivets to be treated and cleaned to avoid turning to dust- Raise titanic so she can be destroyed or sent to a scrap heap? I don't think so..
 

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