TITANIC DESIGN


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Jan 5, 2001
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Je nais comprendes pas?

Excuse my bad French! Seriously, can you reiterate your question? I don't understand it, but would try to help if I did.

Best regards,

Mark.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Mmmmmmmm...The Titanic had plenty of "wall's" otherwise known a watertight bulkheads. They weren't enough to save her. Perhaps you're thinking of a double hull? (Which incidentally wasn't enough to save Britannic.)
 
Oct 28, 2000
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Raymond -- do you mean a longitudinal bulkhead running from bow to stern and splitting the hull into a left and right section?

If so, that could have made the problem worse. Water contained on one side of a longitudinal bulkhead will cause major listing, or leaning of the decks to the side with the damage. If that happened in Titanic, it would have prevented launching half of the ship's lifeboats, which were only half-enough in the first place.

-- David G. Brown
 
T

Tom Pappas

Guest
Hey, RJ!

I take it you mean "would longitudinal compartmenting have saved Titanic?"

This question has been explored here. The short answer is: probably not.

MC: Is French spoken in Leeds, West Yorkshire?
wink.gif
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Hi!

MC: Is French spoken in Leeds, West Yorkshire?

Only on Wednesdays! I wouldn't know -- I've never been to Leeds.

Best,

Mark.
 
R

Raymond John Mulhall

Guest
Hey I mean a solid wall horizontily running from bow to stern dividing they ship in two down the middle of the hull.
And m Chirnside
Palavoo La Anglesh?
<french>>
 
S

Scott R. Andrews

Guest
Hi Raymond,

"...Hey I mean a solid wall horizontily running from bow to stern dividing they ship in two down the middle of the hull..."

Yes, that's precisely what Capt. Dave and Tom Pappas are describing in response to your post of Thursday, 30 January, 2003 - 2:21 pm.

As the Captain pointed out, such an arrangement can produce quite a severe list, and in damage affecting as great a linear area as that which was suffered by the Titanic, this could have even hastened the ship's demise.

Longitudinal bulkheads located on the centerline of the ship were tried in a limited fashion in the machinery spaces of late 19th and early 20th century warships as well as in some merchant ships. In the case of the warships this was obviously done to prevent a single shell or torpedo hit on one side from crippling the entire plant.

In the case of twin screw ships merchant ships, the idea was similar - to prevent the complete loss of propulsion in the event that a collision should breech the engine room. In the few cases I've read about where this happened in such a ship, although the opposite side of the engine room remained dry and functional, the resulting list was quite serious. And, this was the result of flooding only one half of one compartment, rather than 5 or 6.

Scott Andrews
 

david wilson

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Mar 17, 2003
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Scott Andrews,when you asked me what a "batt rivet"was a while back,you started me off on a quest.I have found a site on the great lakes,manitowoc ship repair.In the google search engine type in"riveted & caulked steel vessels".They give a good description of the procedures involved,except for two things.The first is why gouge a loose rivet out from the point side & risk the good chance of damaging the csk,when all they have to do is cut the head off.Second,the csk is not a normal engineering csk.A formula comes into play here.For example a 1"dia pan hd the hole is 1 1/16"dia,top of csk is 1 1/5"dia & the head dia is 1 3/5".I hope this fills up a few blank spaces in your book!!!
seven degrees west.
regards.
dw.
 
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