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Jul 9, 2000
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Better put on your skeptical thinking caps with this one. From the article:
quote:

Romain Jerome said it purchased a piece of the hull weighing about 1.5 kg (3 pounds) that was retrieved in 1991, but declined to identify the seller. The metal has been certified as authentic by the Titanic's builders Harland and Wolff
No provenance but somehow, Harland and Wolff certified the steel as authentic? I'd like to see confirmation from a credible and impartial source before I buy into this one.​
 
Jun 12, 2004
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I never claimed that this was true, only that it is an "interesting" article. The one thing that I don't like about it is the fact that someone seems to be commercializing the Titanic and it's artifacts. I personally would rather see everything (except personal property), including charcoal, placed in a museum where it can be viewed and appreciated.

By the way, I don't see the Titanic movies as commercialization. Yes, Hollywood has been making money off of Titanic, but here the movies serve to pay a sort of tribute and to provide inspiration and insight for further research.

This, if there is any truth in it--and, like Michael, I am skeptical--is a bit tacky, to say the least. The venture seems to be out purely for profit.

My input anyway.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>I thought the selling of Titanic artifacts was illegal anyway.<<

Actually, in and of itself, it's not. Particularly if you happen to own any artifacts that predate discovery and salvage. The catch is that anything post discovery that has been brought to daylight is either held by a scientific body or RMSTI. The first, such as a university or NOAA isn't about to sell anything, and RMSTI is legally barred from selling anything except the coal. Unless something here has changed, this whole offering has the ripe smell of dead fish left too long in the sun. Something here just isn't on the up and up.

As always, Caveat emptor applies.

Commercializing Titanic doesn't bother me in and of itself. That much has been going on for a long time one way or another. However, the possibilty of fraud on any level does. The firm itself may be honest in that they believe they have genuine Titanic steel, but that doesn't mean their "supplier" was.
 
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Still, the firm selling them should be responsible enough to verify it beforehand, no?

Anyway, even it was coal or steel from the hull, it is part of a grave and should be treated with respect. Making a profit on it is not what you'd call "with the purest intentions." Even if no disrespect was intended, it's still thoughtless, IMO.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Still, the firm selling them should be responsible enough to verify it beforehand, no? <<

You would think so, and you would also hope that they would be sensible enough to make sure they weren't recieving stolen goods. The authorities have quite the sense of humour about that. They find it so funny, that they'll cheerfully put you in a room with bars for a wall, and where you can...errrr...consumate your "marraige" to a guy named Butcher!
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If the steel wasn't pinched illegally, I'm still curious as to how provanance would be verified. The steel used in the Titanic's construction was used by just about everybody else, including the Royal Navy. It just wasn't that incredibly unique.
 
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Maybe that's the glitch: it was the kind of metal used on the Titanic, so it's Titanic's metal. See? The wording has a lot to do with it, too, hehe. ;)

Umm, Butcher?! Just call me "Mr. Soprano" (That's one sure-fire way to become a eunich in a matter of a microsecond).
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Maybe that's the glitch: it was the kind of metal used on the Titanic, so it's Titanic's metal. See?<<

Or the Queen Mary's. The same steel made to the same formula and made by the same company was used in her construction nearly a quarter of a century later. In light of that, I think one can see why I'm skeptical of the claim that it came from Titanic.

>>Just call me "Mr. Soprano"<<

I think it's going to be more like "Mr. Submarine" (And he's going to load a torpedo into the tube!)
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