Titanic Drama from the Great Beyond


Status
Not open for further replies.

Dave Gittins

Member
Mar 16, 2000
5,055
339
433
After more than two years of tedious work, William T Stead and I, his humble assistant, have at last completed our greatest task. With all eternity to work in, the greatest dramatist of them all has applied his genius to the Titanic story.

By special permission, a sample of the resulting drama will be made available to members of the Encyclopedia Titanica forum for just 24 hours. The extract consists of the final pages of the play and is set in Lord Mersey's court.

This unique and inventive text will be online from 0000hrs UTC on Tuesday. It will be withdrawn 24 hours later.
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
Member
Aug 20, 2000
8,239
29
398
Niagara Falls, Ontario
I agree with the above posts, this should be kept! Brilliant!

Best regards,

Jason
happy.gif
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Mar 16, 2000
5,055
339
433
In view of the support for my ratbaggery, I have placed on my website two examples of Titanic literature from the Great Beyond. Maybe I'll dream up some more one day but don't hold your breath.

I've also added an extract from the world's worst Titanic poem. This is a perfectly genuine piece from 1912. I regret to say that I have been unable to find out anything about the culprit, except that he may have been some kind of cleric. He was active in South Australia in the first quarter of the 20th century.

Go to http://users.senet.com.au/~gittins/Verse.html
 

Charmaine Sia

Member
Nov 25, 2001
135
3
183
I have to agree with Michael on that note. Ack! I barely made my way through the first stanza of Mr Nixon's "poem" before I decided that it was too much of a torture.

Dave, yours is lovely. Indeed, a well done parody. If only Shakespeare had truly been around to pen something...
wink.gif


Regards,
Charmaine
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Mar 16, 2000
5,055
339
433
Our State Library has other examples of Nixon's work but they are unavailable, due to renovations. One day I'll see if they are all as awful. Maybe some of them will contain hints on who he was. Nothing will happen until about September, if you can wait that long.

To compensate for Nixon's work, Australia did produce one of the greatest of all poems about death by water. It commemorates one Joe Lynch, who died like a true Australian when he fell off a Sydney Harbout ferry, probably while drunk. From this unpromising start, Slessor creates a meditation on the great questions of life and death. It's still copyright, so I can't post it, but look for Five Bells by Kenneth Slessor. Oddly enough, Titanic sank just before five bells, so it's quite appropriate.
 
D

Donna Grizzle

Guest
Dave(Gittins)-

Just checked out the link you posted above for the first time. Bravo on both passages! A jolly good time to read those. I'd like to quote a favorite verse of mine:

"And though brave Captain Rostron came, regardless of cost,
More than fifteen hundred souls were lost,
And articles of commerce, both humble and rare,
As well as numerous pieces of kitchen ware"

My roommate had to come out to investigate what I kept chuckling about. I love it!
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Mar 16, 2000
5,055
339
433
G'day, Donna!

I'm glad you liked my bit of fun. The passage you like is the sort of thing McGonagall wrote. Into the story of a great disaster, he'd inject a remark about the loss of something trivial. There's plenty of his work online. The setting of The Famous Tay Whale I mentioned is available on CD with lots of other musical fun.

If you love great poetry, go to the link further up this thread and read Five Bells. It's a complex poem but a very deep one. Curiously, Titanic hit the bottom at about five bells, the time at which the poet thought of his dead friend.
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Mar 16, 2000
5,055
339
433
As promised, I looked up some more of Christopher Nixon's perishable verse and found a mug shot of him.

His 1913 work, The Lay of Austral' is simpler than The Passing of the Titanic, but nonetheless awful.

Australia is speaking.

"Call me "Fourth Hiving Place" of the sea-lording race:
Brave Columbus' New World ranks prior;
Also Afric' and Ind' were my seniors, you'll find
Austral last - Yet does any rank higher?

Would you measure my skirts? Think! - your survey begirts
All of three-thousand-leagued-ragging line;
My flung acres count billions, square miles tally millions -
Level-height-vale-and-peak grand combine."

I think he's trying to say that Australia is big place, with varied topography. "Ragging" is not a typo!
 
D

Donna Grizzle

Guest
Thanks Dave....will go check that out now.

Whew, the "Lay of Austral" is a brainful but I get the gist of it. Any information as to the popularity of this guy?
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,043
107
333
UK
Dave, this just came through on the ouija:

Aye, The man's guid, that I'll grant ye. But he's nae as guid as me.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads