Titanic epic poem


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Catherine Ehlers

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Has anyone ever read the Titanic epic poem that was written by E. J. Pratt in 1935? And if so, would I still be able to get it anywhere, and is it worth reading?

Cathy Ehlers
 
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Rolf Vonk

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Hi Cathy,

Is E.J. Pratt a German?? Cause I remember that there is an old German Titanic poem book in our library. I shall try to find the name for ya.

Regards,

Rolf
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Mike Herbold

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Dec 13, 1999
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Cathy:
Michael Tennaro has it on his Titanic Book List -- see Links and then Reference and Research. Looks like a tough one to find.
 
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Gavin Murphy

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R,

Pratt a German? Hardly. I believe he is a good Canuck.

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Jun 4, 2000
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Hello all,

Pratt (1882-1964) is a major Canadian poet. Much of his work has a maritime theme and/or deals with man's struggle against nature. While his 'epics' may be regarded as dated they're certainly very readable - and enjoyable, IMO.

Catherine, there are many editions in circulation. I agree with Mikes H&T: the 1932 is reasonably hard to come by. Fortunately there are various collections of Pratt's work readily available, so if you wanted to buy a copy or get it through a library you shouldn't have too much trouble.

But why go for a book when you can check it out on the net for free?
[ul][*]the poem (and a brief biography): www.library.utoronto.ca/canpoetry/pratt [*]complete text of his collected poems and letters: http://www.trentu.ca/pratt [*]detailed biography: http://vicu.utoronto.ca/library/special/pratt2.htm[/li][/list]If you decide on the library option, see if you can get EJ Pratt: Complete Poems - Part I, edited by Sandra Djwa and RG Moyles (University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1989, ISBN 0802057756). This particular collection (apart from including The Titanic and poems on ice floes, Newfoundland and Loss of the Steamship Florizel) has Djwa and Moyles' excellent annotations. Alan Hustak recommended it to me and I've never regretted buying it.

Quote:

And out there in the starlight, with no trace
Upon it of its deed but the last wave
From the Titanic fretting at its base,
Silent, composed, ringed by its icy broods,
The grey shape with the palaeolithic face
Was still the master of the longitudes.



So there you go.

Cheers,

F
 
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