Titanic Historical Society

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Bill Wormstedt

Member
Phil - are you saying that the THS added to or replaced the already standing marker to Milton Long? I hadn't heard that.

Is the THS doing a lot of putting up or replacing markers?

What Kyrila said - though I haven't had any problems on my own with them. But I do keep my mouth shut about the Californian and salvage!
 
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Danielle Gastineau

Member
You know I don't even know why I bothered even asking. All I did was ask a question a simple yes or no answer would of been fine.

Mr Cundiff what did you mean by your "May I lend this advice? Keep your TITANIC *salvage* opinions to yourself, should you choose to join/retain THS membership."

I am sorry if I offended anyone by asking it was mearly a quesiton. If it makes anyone happy I wont post anything else. Bye!

Danielle
 
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Michael Cundiff

Member
Danielle:

Forget I mentioned it, I was not aware how unbeknowst you and Eric are on this anti salvage THS creed.

A particular individual who *loves all things TITANIC* was a member of THS. As this person's feelings on salvage changed, and an association with RMSTI developed...THS was quick to, in effect blacklist said individual.

Yet on the otherhand a prominent member of THS was later to become a *valued* participant with an expedition to the wreck headed by RMS TITANIC INC.

I'll leave you with that. Forgive the intrusion. Follow your minds interest.

Michael A. Cundiff
USA
 
John Clifford

John Clifford

Member
Hi Danielle.

I belong to THS.

For me, the greatest benefits has been the wonderful people I met at the Conventions, including the lovely Millvina Dean.

Some wonderful friendships have been formed, after meeting people who also belong to the organization.

The Commutator magazine is a wonderful publication, with great articles about the Titanic, and other ocean liners of the time.

The membership amounts are $50, $60, and $100, with a portion of the $60 and $100 donations going to the Museum fund.

John Clifford
 
Shelley Dziedzic

Shelley Dziedzic

Member
Good post on gravemarkers Phil- it's always dicey to know what is best when no family is around. I was amazed at the total lack of interest displayed by some family members on some projects. Sometimes it is a matter of money or distance. Less on the stone is usually best. Generally the cemetery requires a family member's permission to place a stone. In the case of Marshall Drew, he was such a well-known figure in town, and his Titanic connection fairly a legend, it was easy to get permission without family waiver. Also knowing what Marshall himself wanted made the wording easy. I am just going through the process for Lusitania's Barbara Anderson's marker for her mother and brother and am so glad there is family around and someone to help on the other side of the pond-this was a dilemma of distance and not knowing where the burial spot was. I agree tombstones should never be advertising billboards. In a vast world of varying tastes, some have a better grasp of what constitutes "good taste" than others. From a historian's point of view- any marker is a Godsend for future generations. As far as the gnarly world of Titanic societies, we all know politics and intrigues and personalities exist in any diverse group but all of these societies have had very fine moments and have contributed to the vast pool of knowledge surrounding the ship. There are enough of them around to be able to pick and choose where we fit in comfortably. Although no longer a member of all of them, I still enjoy looking at the journals of all of them.
 
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Mike Bull

Member
I've visited Fleet's grave, and I'm damn sure from what I've read about the man, that it's not the marker he'd have wanted above his eternal resting place...

I never joined the THS, though I did join the British Titanic Society a few years back, but I'm afraid that as I am unable to visit their yearly conventions, their 'journal' makes for dull reading-it's ALWAYS either talking about the convention just past, or the one coming. Yawn!
 
Inger Sheil

Inger Sheil

Member
LoL! Your comments about the BTS's Atlantic Daily Bulletin make me wonder if we're reading the same publication, Mike. I've been a BTS member for years now, and I've always found it a fascinating read, full of interesting articles and tidbits. Although the convention is a popular event and draws visitors from all over the world, coverage of it in the Society magazine has never struck me as overbalancing the rest of the content. Many individuals choose to publish their original research in this fine magazine, and for very good reason.
 
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Randy Bryan Bigham

Member
I also think the remarks about the ADB are unfair - and untrue! It is a fascinating read with contributions from some of the top researchers in the field. Shame shame.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
Mike, I'll throw in with Inger and Randy on this one. The ADB is a valued publication which I'm proud to receive and retain in my library. It never lacks for research and informative articles.
 
Kyrila Scully

Kyrila Scully

Member
Danielle, after you've been here awhile, you'll learn that none of us ever answer a question with a simple "yes" or "no." It's always a rousing debate. Just sit right back and enjoy the ride.

Kyrila
 
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Darren Honeycutt

Member
The only problem I have with the THS is them doubling the price of a membership from $25.00 in 1996 to $50.00 now. I wonder if that was purposely done to cut down on the amount of members because of the work load?
 
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Bill Wormstedt

Member
I don't think that's quite what happened, Darren - though you can look at it either way.

They had a $25 'student' rate, for school kids, and other people on limited income. Not that they really knew who that was. I seem to recall this rate did not even pay for itself. This rate was gotten rid of.

The 'standard' rate of $40 was raised to $50.

One of the older Commutators had an explanation of what the old rates meant, but I have no idea which issue.
 
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Darren Honeycutt

Member
What made me think this was the fact that during the Titanic craze in 1997 when Camerons movie was out, the THS grew by a few thousand members. I am sure this overwhelmed the small group of volunteers in Indian Orchard. I think that some people just lost interest after the movie but I think the majority probably left due to the price increase. I think that the organization is back to around 5,000 if I am not mistaken.
 
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Geoff Whitfield

Member
You are correct Darren, BTS had similar experiences when membership rose to over 6000. There were some nights when the workload was so heavy it was impossible to go to bed!
I had, at one time, planned to bring in a student rate but THS put me right by telling me that "everybody suddenly appears to have become a student!" which was just not cost effective.
What a lot of people fail to realise is that putting out a magazine of the "Commutator's" high quality, both in printing and postage, is a truly mammoth task and cannot be done cheaply. A 5000 odd print off is, copy for copy, far more expensive than a 50,000 one.
Just as we use any profits etc. from our Convention to offset running costs for the magazine, THS and all other Societies use either sales and/or Convention fees to do the same.
 
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Tarn Stephanos

Member
I was a member of THS from 1983-1998, but was kicked out when they learned I was working at the Boston Titanic artifact exhibition.

tarn Stephanos
 
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