Titanic history in EnglandIreland


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Sep 13, 2003
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Hi all
Normally I reside in Australia but for three months I have the luck of holidaying around England. So far I have visited quite a few museums and have seen different Titanic/ocean liner exhibits in London, Liverpool, Belfast, Cobh, Bristol, Southampton, etc, etc (this is my second visit). I have seen the National Maritime museum, the science museum, etc, etc.I have also been to the public archives in Kew which are simply amazing. Does anyone have any suggestions about any other interesting Titanic/ocean liner/warship exhibits i could visit while I'm lucky enough to be here? Hopefully this is the right thread in which to post a message.

Regards

Richard
 

Bob Godfrey

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Depends what's in those etcs, Richard! You must surely have seen the WW2 cruiser HMS Belfast moored in the Thames. You haven't mentioned Portsmouth, which has the Tudor warship Mary Rose, Nelson's HMS Victory, the Victorian HMS Warrior, and of course the Royal Navy Museum. There's also the Historic Dockyard at Chatham in Kent, which has museum galleries and several Royal Navy ships representing the 19th Century onwards.
 

Ernie Luck

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Hello Richard

Do visit Admiral Nelson's Victory at Portsmouth Docks. They also have an early ironclad warship, The remains of the Mary Rose, a Tudor warship, an excellent museum and more besides.

Bob just beat me to it.
 
Dec 29, 2006
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There is also a maritime museum at Falmouth, together with a collection of naval ordnance and coastal artillery at nearby Pendennis Castle, comprising everything from replica Tudor "sakers" to post-WWII 6-inch BL guns (thought to have been the prototypes of the weapons on the cruisers Lion, Tiger and Blake).

The Merseyside has a number of attractions, including a maritime museum in Liverpool, a boat museum at Ellesmere Port and a smaller Titanic display in Fort Perch Rock, Wallasey.
 
May 31, 2006
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Mention of HMS Belfast brings back fond memories for me. In the early 60's Belfast was homeported in Singapore where I had the good fortune to go aboard her. A real treat for a US sailor who welcomed the fact that at wardroom meals aboard a British Man-O-War you could get a cocktail. She had suffered enough damage during World War II that it was felt that she would not be able to survive sailing back to the UK, and her replacement crews were periodically flown to Singapore to relieve the existing complement. I am so glad to hear that she is available for tours in London. On my next trip to the UK I intend to revisit this fine historical ship with so much WWII history behind her.
 
Sep 13, 2003
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Hi all
Thanks very much for the suggestions. Sorry to take so long to reply to your suggestions but have been on the move a lot. Visited the H.M.S Belfast last week, was fantastic, the engine room gives you a great idea of the complexity of a ship from the age of the Titanic (ignoring the time difference and type of ship). Visited the Cutty Sark but they are in the process of rebuilding her to protect her long term future so couldn't see much. have been to Portsmouth and seen the fantastic displays there last trip, consumed an entire day but probably won't go there this trip. Went to Southampton yesterday, saw there maritime muesem (with there Titanic exhibit) and also went to the Southampton archives where they helped me find a copy of the report into the loss of the Warata, the liner which dissapeared in 1909. I will be going to Liverpool and Belfast at some point to see some other stuff. If I find anything really interesting will be posting it. Thanks again
 
May 3, 2005
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Hi All...especially to Richard-

In the USA, there is the Titanic Museum at Branson, Missouri, which has a full scale replication of the Grand Staircase. (I haven't visited yet, but hope to do so soon.)

There are several warship museums such as the USS Massachusetts, USS North Carolina, USS Alabama and USS Texas, each in their respective states.

I have visited all of these except Massachusetts. These are all "BB" (Battleship) types.

The USS Texas, located at the San Jacinto Battlefield near Houston, Texas, is something of a contemporary of the Titanic. It was launched in 1915 and saw service in both World Wars I and II.

A tour was made recently to Corpus Christi, Texas to the USS Lexington Museum, (ex CV-16) , a large aircraft carrier which saw service in WW II.

There is also a museum at the USS Yorktown, another WWII aircraft carrier, and still another aircraft carrier museum is the USS Midway at San Diego, California.

The USS Texas was a "stand in" for the USS Tennessee in the movie "Pearl Harbor."

The USS Lexington played the parts of a Japanese aircraft carrier in the attack of December 7, 1941 and also as a "stand in" for the USS Hornet in the same movie.
 

Jason D. Tiller

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Hello Richard,

quote:

Visited the Cutty Sark but they are in the process of rebuilding her to protect her long term future so couldn't see much.

That's unfortunate that you weren't able to see much of the old girl, but good to hear the appropriate people have taken the necessary steps to preserve her, as there was some concern as to if or when it was going to be carried out. Frankly, it's about time.

Thanks for mentioning it and enjoy the rest of your trip.​
 
Sep 13, 2003
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Hi all
I'm in Glasgow and tomorrow will be trotting of to Belfast. I spent a few days in the University of Glasgow Archives and managed to find some material on the building of the Laurentic/Olympic and Titanics central turbines by John Brown & co. Also took a few photos of what is left of the Gowan Harland & Wolff shipsyard on the Clyde. Will post then when get a chance.
Richard
 
Sep 13, 2003
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Hi there
I have been fortunate enough to stay in Belfast for a week and a half. Have had a look at the PRONI archives for Harland and Wolff. They are not as extensive as I would have imagined but there are a lot of fascinating tidbits (on reflection I lost likely have ridiculous expectations, Harland & Wolf want to build ships not document them!!!), I learned about the building of the Olympic/Titanic which were probablty covered in the book; Building the Titanic but at this distance cannot remember. Also had a chance to visit the Nomadic. She seems to be in good shape and steadily improving under the trust looking after her, which is great. On the day I was there, a radio interview was being recorded about the ship. There is a lot of Olympic memorabilla on board; including the Olympics registration papers and some stuff I think from the National Archives about the repairs to her stern casting in the early 20's. A lot of the Harland and Wolff site where the Titanic was built has now been demolished but there are still interesting parts left, like the pumphouse, thompson dock, drawing rooms and main administration building. Anyway...

Richard
 
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