Titanic Hypothetical Career


ADeblois

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Mar 18, 2012
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Hey guys, I recently finished typing up a hypothetical career for Titanic, if she hit the iceberg but survived and limped into New York. Most of the stuff that happen in my telling of her story is fictional, but based off real-life situations her sister Olympic encountered. I have to admit, by the end of typing this I nearly cried when I got to writing about her scrapping, as by that point in the story I felt a real attachment between me and Titanic . Please enjoy my handiwork, and comment please.

The Story of the Royal Mail Steamer Titanic (1912-1938)

View attachment Titanic Service.txt
 
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Jan 6, 2005
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With the lesser iceberg damage you describe, plausible enough.

Funny how well we all know Titanic's story - and how much we all, in our own separate ways, want it to end differently, isn't it?
 

Scott Mills

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I think that this is often the case that people wish for something different when they are fascinated with one particular disastrous event.

I am certainly that way with Titanic, and to some extent the American Civil war. But in the latter case it isn't so much as wanting some different outcome, but empathizing with those who fought and died for a losing cause (like my 3rd great grandfather and uncle,) and imagining the way things would have been different.

In the end it helps me with Titanic to imagine the multiple worlds interpretation of quantum physics is correct. In which case there are infinite worlds in which Titanic missed that berg, or never encountered it at all! I just wish that it I learn enough about what happened something will change ours.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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As Captain David Brown is fond of pointing out, history does not reveal it's alternatives. The "what if's" however can make some interesting fodder for discussion. I would have to point out that as the second sister in the planned trio, Titanic would have very likely gone down into obscurity as it was almost always the lead ship in a class which got all the attention.

It's possible that she might have run afoul a German submarine during the war but I suspect that she might well have survived that. From there, she would have seen service either as a trooper during the war or a hospital ship. She had the capacity and it was sorely needed. After the war, I think she would have had a good long life until the Great Depression sent her packing to the breaker's yard.

Honestly, a ship which goes on to have a steady if unremarkable career is something mariners tend to dream about as when second sisters make the news, it tends to be under very bad circumstances in which a lot of people get dead.
 

ADeblois

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Honestly, a ship which goes on to have a steady if unremarkable career is something mariners tend to dream about as when second sisters make the news, it tends to be under very bad circumstances in which a lot of people get dead.
Well, I did add some couple mishaps: the most famous one of course being the iceberg collision in 1912; I also added a collision between Titanic and Baltic. Also, about the second sister making the news - it strictly wouldn't apply to Lusitania and Mauretania, however. Lusitania and not Mauretania met a fateful end, and it was Mauretania (the second ship) which led a successful career in peace and war.

Also, what did you guys think of the actual timeline...when you read it, does it sound realistic, like these events could have actually happened? I also added by own tidbits like Titanic's peacetime nickname "Big T" and equal popularity to Olympic. By the end of writing this, I thought to myself that Titanic would have had a great career, had fate not reared its' ugly head.
 
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>>it strictly wouldn't apply to Lusitania and Mauretania, however.<<

The difference with these two was that they were competing with each other for the Blue Ribband. (Not that Cunard would ever admit it, but I doubt they were ashamed of it! ;-) )
 

VillageJen

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Apr 18, 2012
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ADeblois, I am heading off to the airport for a vacation but I look forward to reading your work when I return. Thank you for sharing it with us.

I think that this is often the case that people wish for something different when they are fascinated with one particular disastrous event.
I am forever telling my husband, whenever I see a Titanic movie or read a book, how very much I wish it would end differently this time. It literally pains me that I know the end is unchangeable.

Scott, the Civil War was a tragedy and this Yankee has a great deal of sympathy for the South.
 
Jan 6, 2005
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I am forever telling my husband, whenever I see a Titanic movie or read a book, how very much I wish it would end differently this time. It literally pains me that I know the end is unchangeable.
Jen: This is one of the reasons I did not see the Cameron movie for some years after it was released. In fact, before its release, I was quite scornful of its chances at the box-office, owing to the fact that most reasonably educated persons would know how the story ended. I had some fun at Cameron's expense, with a jokey tag-line I thought would sum up the film for its posters: "Titanic: The Iceberg Wins."

Two billion dollars later, I am not so scornful any more!
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Two billion dollars later, I am not so scornful any more! <<

Nothing succeeds quite like success!

Personally, I'm more interested in the work which Cameron did after that in terms of real exploration. From a scientific standpoint, as loath as some of us may be to admit it, he led the way.
 

Scott Mills

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Jen: This is one of the reasons I did not see the Cameron movie for some years after it was released. In fact, before its release, I was quite scornful of its chances at the box-office, owing to the fact that most reasonably educated persons would know how the story ended. I had some fun at Cameron's expense, with a jokey tag-line I thought would sum up the film for its posters: "Titanic: The Iceberg Wins."

Two billion dollars later, I am not so scornful any more!
I was 20 years old and working at a theatre when Cameron's movie came out. I was so excited about it--I ended up seeing it 17 times in the theatre (for free of course). And before you ask I had already absorbed dozens of books on Titanic, starting at 7 years old.

My friends at the time could verify how annoying I was to see the film with, always interjecting when some detail or another was wrong.
 

Jake Peterson

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And then of course, there was the teenage demographic, who probably, with minor exceptions, wanted to either see Leonardo Di Caprio, or Kate Winslet.
 
Jan 6, 2005
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Michael: That real exploration is one of the things I admire about Cameron. His interest in RMS Titanic went far beyond learning what he had to know to get a movie made; he returns to the wreck at (I understand) his own expense to learn more. As the years go by, I think it quite likely that one of Cameron's detractors will cite evidence discovered during one of Cameron's own expeditions as proof of inaccuracy in the movie!
 

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