Titanic meals questions


Sep 1, 2004
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I have few questions about Titanic's meals which I can not translate.

What is "Saute' of Chicken"
"Mousseline Sauce" (Salmon, Mousseline Sauce, Cucumber) - is it sparkling or does it mean smooth (as muslin)?
Was "Waldorf Pudding" made of eggs or vanilla? I saw two translations but I do not know what's correct
What are "Potted shrimps". I can not find what is "potted"

Thank you very much
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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'Saute' means fried quickly in a small amount of hot fat.
A mousseline sauce is one which has been whipped or beaten to obtain a light, frothy texture (a mousse) - usually made from eggs and cream with seasoning.
I don't think anybody now knows what Waldorf Pudding was, so you have to guess!
Potted shrimps have been peeled, then cooked in butter and spices, then compressed into small containers (pots) and sealed in with more butter.
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Sep 1, 2004
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Thank you very much. I read in a book that Egg puding (it was Waldorf puding). But I found somewhere that "waldorf" means vanilla or something like this.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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The name 'Waldorf' comes from the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York, where the pudding was first served. But now even they don't remember anything about it. The writers of the book Last Dinner on the Titanic said that this was the only recipe they could not track down, so they invented a creamy pudding which included ingredients like vanilla, nutmeg, apples, raisins and walnuts. That same invented recipe has since appeared on many websites and even on restaurant menus which claim it to be the real thing. The original writers did not intend this - it was just a speculation of what the pudding might have been.
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Robert Hall

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Jan 26, 2005
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That Waldorf pudding recipe sounds like the ingredients for a Waldorf salad ? Makes sense if one can't find the original recipe I think.
 

JULIA HESSE

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Apr 20, 2006
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Going to a Titanic party this after noon,does anyone know what Puckles are it is on the third class menu,says Potatoes and Puckles.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Misprint, probably - should be potatoes and pickles. Welcome to the forum, Julia. When you've had a chance to find your way around, it's best to post in the most suitable thread. There are several threads about food in the 'life on board' section, which make interesting reading. Happy hunting!

[Moderator's note: This post and the one immediately above it, were in another thread outside of this subtopic, but have been moved to the pre-existing one on the same subject. JDT]
 
S

sashka pozzetti

Guest
I just saw a programme in which they made potted shrimps, which are delicious. You fry brown shrimps in lots of butter, and add cayenne pepper. That is basically it. You then put them in a small pot, and compress them so that there is no air. You then pour melted butter on top to seal the shrimps in. Serve on toast. Delicious!!
 

james cony

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Sep 24, 2008
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does any 1 no what the titanic people eat if so can you tell me

[Moderator's Note: This message, originally posted in an unrelated topic, has been moved to the pre-existing thread discussing the same subject. JDT]
 
Dec 5, 2008
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If he is, it's nothing compared to one previous member I am POSITIVE was a Troll, and either went unnoticed or ignored for quite some painful time...

If he is, at least he's not a bothersome one.
 
Dec 5, 2008
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Evgueni, I'll message you privately with the specifics a little later. :p I need to run some errands right now and it'll take me a while to find and show you some of my favorite examples of her blatant troll-ism. Plus, I don't want to say anything too specific on the forums.

I wasn't even sure for a while, because she was so... dedicated... to the matter, but I showed a friend a running commentary with no mention of suspected trolling, and she was screaming it within seconds, so I am positive! :p
 

Darin Kight

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May 29, 2010
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Pardon me if this has been addressed elsewhere. I was wondering about table bread, rolls. Would these have been served with an individual course or would a waiter offer them to diners separately? Also, just curious, when passengers took their seats, was there anything actually on the table, such as rolls and butter?
 
Jul 11, 2010
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California
Generally speaking, the only thing on the table at an Edwardian supper were the table decorations (small lamps, flowers, fruit, candles), menu cards, and the cover (that is, the service plate, flatware, glasses, and folded napkin). And usually, as per an American etiquette book, a plate of oysters awaited diners when they in their designated seats.
 
Jul 11, 2010
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Forgot to add. I found the following recipes for "Waldorf Pudding":

Cook book by Calvary Presbyterian Church (Springfield, Mo.). Ladies' Aid Society, 1903

"Fill a buttered pudding dish with peeled and sliced apples, alternating layers of stale cake or bread crumbs and allowing two tablespoonfuls of melted butter to each pint of apples. Crumbs should be on top. Set in a moderate oven to bake until the apples are tender. Pour over a cup of milk and two eggs beaten with half a cup of sugar and bake to a pretty brown. Serve with cream."

Vermont cookery by First Congregational Church (Bellows Falls, Vt.), 1899

"Peel and slice sufficient apples to fill a baking dish; butter the dish thickly and put in the apples in layers, alternating them with stale cake crumbs and a little melted butter, using two tablespoonfuls of the latter to a pint of apples ; let the last layer be crumbs. Cover, and put in a hot oven until the apples are soft; then beat together two eggs and two tablespoonfuls of sugar, add one cup of cream or rich milk; add this, return to the oven until the pudding is a rich brown. Serve with cream."

Everyday desserts by Olive Green, 1911

"Break up half a pound of stale lady-fingers and cook to a smooth paste with a quart of cream. Add half a cupful of sugar, three tablespoonfuls of butter, a wineglassful of sherry, and a sprinkling of grated nutmeg. Cool, add the well-beaten yolks of four eggs and three tablespoonfuls of almonds blanched and pounded to a paste with lemon-juice. Turn into a baking-dish, sprinkle with sugar, and bake in a quick oven."
 

Darin Kight

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May 29, 2010
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Thank you, I find almost everything about the Edwardian world fascinating, especially the food and the whole proscribed ritual behind Dinner, and one million rules one had to know not to mention the names and uses of all that silverware. The Waldorf pudding sounds like a cholesterol watcher's nightmare, but I would be hard pressed to try and finish the entire thing. Trust me, I could do it. You wouldn't have a good recipe for bread pudding would you? That is my favorite.
 

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