Titanic Miscellany

Chalkie

Chalkie

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HER LADYSHIP THE BIG GAME HUNTER
Mrs Charlotte Drake Martinez Cardeza (aged 58), one of the survivors of the Titanic disaster, was a big game hunter and noted yachtswoman (she twice circumnavigated the world skippering her steam yacht “Eleanor”), and a member of one of Philadelphia's most elite families. She was on her way back home to the USA, boarding Titanic at Cherbourg, after being on Safari in Africa accompanied by her 36-year old son Thomas, her valet Gustave Lesueur and her maid Annie Ward when Titanic struck an iceberg at 11:40 pm on Sunday 14th April 1912. However, she almost did not survive the disaster, only agreeing to enter a lifeboat after a crew member secured a place for her son alongside her. Charlotte was the widow of the Philadelphia attorney, James Warburton Martinez-Cardeza (1854-1932), and the daughter of the late Thomas Drake, a wealthy banker and industrialist (he pioneered the manufacturing of denim blue jeans). Lady Cardeza, as she became to be known as a result of her husband’s noble Spanish ancestry, occupied the largest suite of rooms onboard Titanic (Suites B-51/53/55 –Ticket No. 17755, £512). Indeed, her suite was one of only two “Millionaire Suites” onboard the ship with the other directly opposite her on the port side and occupied by J. Bruce Ismay. She also took more luggage onboard the ship than any other passenger: 14 steamer trunks (containing: 70 dresses, 10 fur coats and 91 pairs of gloves), 3 packing cases, 4 bags and 1 jewel case. Charlotte was rescued by RMS Carpathia from Lifeboat No.3 along with her son, valet and maid. Charlotte died at her home in 1939 and when her son Thomas died in 1952 he was entombed beside her in the family mausoleum at West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania. In addition to Mrs Cardeza and her son, four other Titanic survivors are interred at West Laurel Hill Cemetery. Mr. William E. Carter and his son William T. Carter II are entombed in the Carter family mausoleum. In other parts of the cemetery, buried with their respective spouses are Mrs. Anna Moynahan (nee Miss Anna M. Ward, Mrs. Cardeza's personal maid) and Mrs Gretchen Leopold (nee Miss Gretchen Fiske Longley, a first-class passenger onboard Titanic). The family fortune of $5.5 million went to Jefferson Medical College to establish “The Charlotte Drake Cardeza Foundation” for blood research.






Did You Know That?
Mrs. Cardeza was one of Titanic’s largest insurance claimants filing a claim for £36,567 2s (around $177,000) for her lost items (worth an estimated £1.75 million today). Approximately £30,000 of her claim was for lost jewellery.
 
Chalkie

Chalkie

Member
OLD TOMMY & THE JINXED SHIP
A story was often told by workers at Belfast’s Harland & Wolff Shipyard that just prior to Titanic’s completion they often heard a faint knocking sound on the other side of a bulkhead, suggesting that a fellow worker had got trapped inside one the of the large metal walls. It was claimed that the knocking went on for a few days before finally dying out completely. Workers are said to have claimed that the knocking was being done by “Old Tommy” who had been hammering rivets into Titanic’s boiler room one day when planks of wood fell on top of him and killed him. However, many consider this piece of Titanic folklore to be nothing more of an embellishment of a similar piece of folklore about the Great Eastern. The Great Eastern was designed in 1854 by the legendary British Engineer, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, and when it was launched on 31st January 1858, it was the largest ship ever built, six times bigger than anything before it and could carry 4,000 passengers from England to Australia without refueling. The ship was built in Millwall, London and during its construction a riveter and his apprentice went missing. Rumours among the workforce were abound with tales of how the pair had been accidently sealed-up in a compartment of the ship while their cries for help were drowned out by the noise of the riveters’ hammers. Four years after the Great Easternwas launched it struck an uncharted rock which tore open her hull but the ship was saved from sinking as it had been constructed with a double hull. After expensive repairs to her were carried out, she was finally purchased for conversion into a cable-laying ship, a role in which she was successfully employed for a number of years. Following her stint as a cable ship, her owners tried unsuccessfully to sell her before eventually disposing of her in 1889 for scrap. It is claimed that men involved in demolishing the Great Eastern found two skeletons in her hull, a story repeated in a 2003 BBC documentary about Brunel’s ship which formed part of the BBC’s “Seven Wonders of the World” series. The Great Eastern will go down in history as the ship that helped lay the first transatlantic telegraph cable in 1865.



Did You Know That?
The top mast from the Great Eastern can be found today at Anfield, home to Liverpool Football Club. It serves as the club’s flag pole.
 
Chalkie

Chalkie

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SS NOMADIC SAVED
On 16th September 2009, it was announced that a £7 million restoration of SS Nomadic, a purpose-built tender ship to ferry passengers from Cherbourg Harbour out to RMS Titanic ahead of its ill-fated maiden Atlantic voyage, was to begin in the spring of 2010 after the project secured a £500,000 cash injection. The grant was given to the Nomadic Trust, the government-appointed Charitable Trust to oversee the restoration of the ship, by the Northern Ireland Tourist Board (NITB) andpushed the total raised to refit the ship past the £4 million mark. The Nomadic Trust were delighted with the grant after plans to re-open the Nomadic to the public ahead of the centenary of its launch (and of the Titanic's launch) in Belfast in 1911 had been thrown into doubt in early 2009 after auditors expressed concern over a funding shortfall. At the time of the audit it was stated that the Nomadic Trust was approximately £3.6 million short of its £5 million target for 2008. However, since the audit the Nomadic Trust received a £2.27 million grant from the European Union as well as the £500,000 from the NITB. Trust Chairman Denis Rooney said he was delighted NITB had recognised the project's potential: "This is another very generous injection to Nomadic's restoration and I'd like to thank NITB for its support. Nomadic is a unique project - she represents the country's strong maritime and industrial heritage and her links to Titanic further strengthen her appeal. Her restoration will undoubtedly improve the visitor experience and enhance Northern Ireland as a tourism destination." Other funders who have contributed to the restoration project include Belfast City Council, Belfast Harbour, Titanic Quarter Ltd, Ulster Garden Villages and the Better Belfast Project. Both the Nomadic and the Titanic were launched from Belfast's Harland and Wolff shipyard in 1911 (25th April 1911 & 31st May 1911 respectively).
https://youtu.be/fJT4vLMNzew
Did You Know That?
The Nomadic was saved from a wrecker's yard in France in 2006 by the Stormont Executive.
 
Andy A Carter

Andy A Carter

www.andycarter.net
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PRESIDENT LINCOLN AND THE TITANIC

On 4th March 1861, Abraham Lincoln was elected the 16th President of the United States of America whilst on 4th March 1912 the engineering crew of the Titanic began to assemble in Belfast. On 11th April 1865, President Abraham Lincoln gave a speech concerning the reconstruction of the United States of America. John Wilkes Booth, a well-known actor at the time and Confederate spy, had planned to kidnap the President and offer him in exchange for the release of Confederate prisoners. However, after hearing Lincoln’s speech Booth became so enraged that he decided to assassinate the President. On 11th April 1912, the Titanic left Queenstown (Cobh), County Cork, Ireland, the third and final leg of her maiden voyage to New York having previously departed from Southampton and Cherbourg, France. On the evening of Sunday 14th April 1865, President Lincoln and his wife attended Ford’s Theatre in Washington to watch the play “Our American Cousins.” Booth entered the theatre and made his way to Box 7 where the President was situated and fired a single point blank shot into the back of his head before leaping from the box and escaping. After being shot President Lincoln was taken across the street to the Petersen House where he was cared for by Dr. Charles Leale and lay in a coma for nine hours. On the evening of 14th April 1912, Titanic struck an iceberg at 11:40 pm. President Lincoln was pronounced dead on Monday 15th April 1865 and in the early hours of the morning of 15th April 1912, the world was informed that the Titanic had sank resulting in the loss of 1,523 lives.

On the evening of 14th April 1865, President Lincoln’s main bodyguard Ward Hill Lamon, to whom he had relayed his dream of being assassinated, was absent from his post.
Clutching at straws.

You could write the same with 100,000s of people around the World.

Andy
 
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Seumas

Seumas

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Clutching at straws.

You could write the same with 100,000s of people around the World.

Andy
Agreed.

Don't see what this thread is adding to the forum at all. But maybe I'm just an idiot.
 
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Chalkie

Chalkie

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TITANIC’S AUNT ON HER WAY
RMS Baltic, a White Star Line vessel built in 1903 by the Harland & Wolff Shipyard, Belfast was one of the ships in wireless radio contact with the Marconi Radio Station at Cape Race after Titanic struck an iceberg at 11:40 pm on Sunday 14th April 1912. About half an hour after Titanic’s collision with the iceberg the Marconi Radio Station notified several vessels, including the Baltic, that the Titanic had issued a distress signal. The Baltic was approximately 200 miles from Titanic and expected to be on the scene of the disaster around 12.00noon on Monday 15th April 1912. Three years prior to being asked to assist her older relative the Titanic, the Baltic was involved in a similar rescue operation. At 5.30am on 23rd January 1909, while the Titanic was still under construction, the White Star Line’s RMS Republic, outward bound from New York for Mediterranean ports, collided with SS Florida, a steam ship owned by the Lloyd Italiano Line bound for New York. The collision occurred 250 miles from New York and just 26 miles southeast of the Nantucket Lightship in the foggy waters of the Atlantic. The Republic suffered the most damage and managed to stay afloat while all 461 of her passengers were safely transferred to the Florida. However, when Captain Ransom of the Baltic arrived at the scene in response to a wireless appeal from the Republic, he noticed the Florida’s bow was caved in and ordered everyone onboard the Florida to board the Baltic. This double-transfer open-sea rescue exchange remains the largest in maritime history. The Baltic decided to tow the Republic back to New York in case she was struck by another ship in the fog (the Republic’s lights were out as she had lost all power) but when too many of the latter ship’s water-tight compartments became flooded she sank 50 miles south of Nantucket Island. At the time the “unsinkable” Republic was the biggest and most technologically advanced ship to sink, with this unwanted “claim to fame” later surpassed by her relative, the Titanic. Ever since her sinking rumours have abounded that the Republic went down to her watery grave with a “treasure trove of gold.” It has been claimed that along with the $3 million five-ton shipment of mint condition American Gold Eagle coins onboard, she also had a $265,000 US Navy Payroll (consigned to the US Navy Atlantic Fleet at Gibraltar), a consignment of silver ingots worth several hundred thousand dollars at the time and a secret shipment of gold that had been consigned to the Czar of Russia. Despite the fact that Captain Martin Bayerle located the wreck of the Republic in 1981, none of her “lost treasure,” worth an estimated $5 billion today, has ever been recovered. The Baltic was scrapped in Osaka, Japan in 1933.





Did You Know That?

In 1904, the first radio distress signal “CQD” was adopted. Interestingly, this signal was used for first time five years later when the Republic and the Florida collided.
 
Seumas

Seumas

Member
Did You Know That?

In 1904, the first radio distress signal “CQD” was adopted. Interestingly, this signal was used for first time five years later when the Republic and the Florida collided.
That's not correct.

It was first transmitted during a maritime emergency in 1903.

The Republic may (that's open to question) have been the first ship to use it after it had been designated an official signal of distress but nonetheless CQD had been already been used in an emergency several years before.
 
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Chalkie

Chalkie

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TITANIC’S LOVERS
In early 1912, Henry Samuel Morley, a 39-year old married sweet shop owner living in Worcester, England and Kate Florence Phillips, his 19-year old shop assistant were having an affair. The lovers booked a second-class crossing onboard RMS Titanic’s ill-fated maiden voyage in the hope that they could begin a new life together in the United States of America. Henry and Kate used the names Mr & Mrs Marshall when they booked their voyage. Their illicit love affair is believed to be the inspiration for the characters of Jack and Rose (played by Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet) in James Cameron’s 1997 blockbuster movie “Titanic.” When they were onboard the Titanic Henry gave Kate a sapphire necklace which has been on display in various Titanic exhibitions whilst the necklace is believed to be the inspiration behind the “Heart of the Ocean” necklace featured in Cameron’s movie. The young Kate was one of the last passengers to leave Titanic before the great liner sank but alas her lover died when the ship was claimed by the freezing cold water of the North Atlantic Ocean. His body if ever recovered was never identified. However, Kate had conceived onboard Titanic and gave birth to a daughter, Ellen, on 11th January 1913 at her grandparent’s home in Worcester, exactly nine months to the day when Titanic stopped off at Queenstown, Ireland. Mrs Ellen Walker (née Phillips) died aged 92 in October 2005 and in her will she left the vast majority of her estate to the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and asked for her ashes to be scattered at sea. On 1st November 2006, a memorial service was held for Ellen onboard the Spirit of Padstow, a Tamar Class lifeboat off Cataclew Point, near Padstow, Cornwall and honouring her last wish the crew of the lifeboat scattered her ashes on to the surface of the Atlantic. During her lifetime Ellen was very supportive of the work of the RNLI and never forgot how her mother had been rescued by the Carpathia from one of Titanic’s lifeboats. Her son, 70-year old Robert Farmer, said: “I think that she wanted to be in the same place as her father because she had never been close to him or known him. All I knew as a child was her father died on the Titanic.”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nsug0RgqvsE
Did You Know That?
When Henry eloped with Kate he left behind a wife and a 12-year old daughter. He told his wife that he was going to Los Angeles, California to get better following a recent illness.
 
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