Titanic Photos

May 3, 2015
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I ran across some Titanic photos that I was unfamiliar with and thought I would share them in case they were new to anyone else as well.


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19_titanic.jpg


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BB246-Titanic_150dpi.jpg


SS-Titanic.jpg
 

Jim Currie

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Apr 16, 2008
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Funchal. Madeira
Great picture! Wonder who owned the steam yacht in the middle ground. You can see the companion ladder is down and ready for use on the port side. Perhaps that's the Solent pilot boat on the way out to her?

Incidentally; there's a similar yacht in this picture:incident 7.jpg

Jim C.

incident 7.jpg
 

Doug Criner

Member
Dec 2, 2009
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Pilots when entering or leaving harbor are, of course, necessary. But concerning the possible photo of the pilot boat in the Solent raises some questions in my mind. I have understood that the pilot is in exclusive charge of the piloting of the ship, not the ship's captain.

A few weeks ago, a large nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, USS Theodore Roosevelt, sailed into the Solent for a visit to Portsmouth, obviously with a local pilot. Would the English pilot have been able to make rudder orders and engine orders, or just make recommendations to the ship's captain?
 

Jim Currie

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Apr 16, 2008
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Funchal. Madeira
Hello Doug.

On the old days, when the pilot boarded, the following legend was written in the Movement Book "Helm and engines to master's orders and Pilot's advice"

Things have changed a bit since then. Now, the legal position of The Port Authority, Pilot and Master (Owner) have to be taken into consideration. The Pilot is in full charge when within pilotage waters. However, when push comes to shove, the Master of a ship is "GOD", If he deems it necessary to save his ship and those on it from harm, he will "sack" the pilot and do the job himself. They then sort it out between them in the aftermath.

Jim C.
 
Mar 18, 2008
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Germany
It is not the pilot boat (only a yacht). Pilot Bowyer already boarded the ship at her berth before leaving. He was later taken off the ship by an Isle of Wight pilot boat.
 

Jim Currie

Member
Apr 16, 2008
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Funchal. Madeira
I din't mean a pilot for TitanicIoannis. I meant a pilot for the steam yacht. I was referring to the small vessel approaching the steam yacht. See here:

19_titanic.jpg

The steam yacht seems to be underway and in-bound.

Jim C.

19_titanic.jpg
 
Nov 13, 2014
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Belgium
BB246-Titanic_150dpi.jpg
I think this picture was taken after the near-collision with the New York. If I'm right, those two funnels on the very left are from the Oceanic, and the two funnels left of the Titanic are from the New York. When the near-collision took place, Titanic had to stop for an hour. This picture was taken when Titanic was back on track.

BB246-Titanic_150dpi.jpg
 

Doug Criner

Member
Dec 2, 2009
408
36
98
USA
On the old days, when the pilot boarded, the following legend was written in the Movement Book "Helm and engines to master's orders and Pilot's advice"

Things have changed a bit since then.
Question: Do some merchant ship captains have a bit of disdain for pilots? Considering pilots a bit superfluous and maybe union featherbedders? Not like waiting for the pilot to finally arrive? I sensed that attitude among some naval officers.