'Titanic' post-April statistics

Oct 27, 2012
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Saint-Petersburg, Russia
Maybe a strange question, but does somebody have any information about the post-April statistics of the Titanic's victims?
I mean, any data on the people (seriously injured or wounded during their escape) who died not immediately, but in the following weeks & months after the disaster... Like famous Col. Gracie, for example.

Sorry for starting so gloomy & mournful topic here...

Any help would be greatly appreciated though!
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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Hi Eugene,

Whilst I can't offer any specific statistics, I don't believe that the deaths of survivors in the aftermath of the sinking could necessarily be related back to the sinking itself - it was a pretty rough night for everybody! However there was a few survivors who died reasonably quickly after the sinking, including Gracie as you mentioned.

Hopefully somebody can offer some more specific information!

Cheers,
Adam.
 
Oct 27, 2012
43
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36
Saint-Petersburg, Russia
Thank you for the participation and viewing, Adam!

Of course, there was Gracie who actually died shortly after the rescue (he at least managed to write his book, thank God!), and also I don't forget about Bruce Ismay, as well (who, it can be said, "died" in a figurative sense - not physically, but psychologically and as a major public & managing figure, you know)...

There were also a few bright examples of literally weird, miraculous salvations, when people have survived against all odds and despite all the roughness, climbing out of the jaws of death (like Jack Thayer and all from Collapsible B)...

But here I'm most interested in all lesser known, undistinguished persons who didn't have enough strength to continue living after this fateful night... if such examples exist.
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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Hi Eugene,

Yes, Bruce Ismay did become quite a recluse after the sinking, never recovered from it - huge disasters like that tend to have a shockwave effect on those surrounding them.
What suprises me are all the small children who survived, on such a bitterly cold night and with so much going on around them.

One must take into account as well that the average life span was significantly less in 1912 than it is now, so it would not be uncommon for a relatively young adult to die shortly after the sinking but for completely unrelated reasons.

Cheers,
Adam.
 

Mark Baber

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Bruce Ismay did become quite a recluse after the sinking
Adam, even after Titanic sank Ismay remained quite active in business matters, especially in the insurance industry, until he began cutting back due to health concerns in the mid-1930's; look here.
 
Oct 27, 2012
43
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36
Saint-Petersburg, Russia
...Ismay remained quite active in business matters, especially in the insurance industry,...
Insurance and railway, yes, but not shipowning or ocean-going passenger services, as far as I know... or?...

Walter Lord (who’s probably responsible for that “Ismay as recluse myth”) stated that Ismay didn’t make any more transatlantic trips to America after the Titanic. No more maritime activities from Ismay, definitely.

Thanks for the note, anyway, Mark! Although it’s a little bit away from this particular subject ;)

[Got a cool book about Ismay in my home library, btw… ->]

Frances_Wilson_2011.jpg

Frances_Wilson_2011.jpg
 

Mark Baber

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Insurance and railway, yes, but not shipowning or ocean-going passenger services
Well, he remained as chairman and director of the Asiatic Steam Navigation Co. until 1934 (although I'm not sure exactly what that company did).
Ismay didn’t make any more transatlantic trips to America after the Titanic.
That's certainly true.
No more maritime activities from Ismay, definitely.
Depends on the definition, I guess. Quite a few of the activities he remained engaged with were ship-related.
Thanks for the note, anyway, Mark!
Quite welcome.
[Got a cool book about Ismay in my home library, btw… ->]
There's some discussion of this book here.
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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Mark:

Thank you for that. I guess what I should have said was that his reputation never really recovered and he was more reclusive later in life than he had been during the glory days prior to the sinking of the Titanic. A lot of people never forgave him for taking the seat in a lifeboat.

Cheers,
Adam.
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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Michael:

Precisely. Having to live with that every day of the rest of your life would be just as difficult, and perhaps even more difficult than the disapproval or downright condemnation of others around that person.

Cheers,
Adam.