Titanic proceeding to Halifax


Apr 16, 2010
4
0
71
Santa Ana Register dated April 15,1912 article says Titanic Ship was actually being towed back to land..Today this paper is called The Orange County Register...See One Article Attachment File..

santaAnanews.jpg
 
A

Aaron_2016

Guest
Santa Ana Register dated April 15,1912 article says Titanic Ship was actually being towed back to land..Today this paper is called The Orange County Register...See One Article Attachment File..

Good find. A number of newspapers had reported the Titanic was safe and was being towed to Halifax. The reports were believed so much that the company even chartered a private railway train to deliver the passengers of the Titanic back to New York to meet their connections.


Halifax.png



It has been speculated that the wireless reports got mixed up which led to the newspapers publishing the story wrong. The Carpathia was originally going to take the survivors to Halifax and there were reports in the cross-wires that a German oil tanker needed to be towed because it had run out of coal. It is possible that these reports got mixed up during the wireless traffic as everyone eagerly waited for news on the Titanic and reported the Titanic was being towed to Halifax by mistake. The idea that she could sink with heavy loss of life was unthinkable. She was after all the safest ship in the world. They were not prepared to think the worst and were very optimistic that she was quite safe. Even the officers on the Titanic did not believe she would go down when they lowered the lifeboats. e.g.

3rd officer Pitman
"We then cast the boat off and pulled away some safe distance from the ship. It was not for an hour that I realized she would go, an hour after we got into the water. I quite thought we would have to return to the ship again, perhaps at daylight. My idea was that if any wind sprang up we should drift away from the ship and have a job to get back again."

2nd officer Lightoller
"I did not think it was a serious accident......I told them it was merely a precaution and that very likely they would all be taken on board again at daylight.....No one believed the ship was actually in any danger. I'm afraid that my own confidence that she wouldn't or couldn't sink rather conveyed itself to others, for there were actually cases were women absolutely refused to be put in a boat."


.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Nov 14, 2005
2,235
1,127
308
Good find. A number of newspapers had reported the Titanic was safe and was being towed to Halifax. The reports were believed so much that the company even chartered a private railway train to deliver the passengers of the Titanic back to New York to meet their connections.


View attachment 41326


It has been speculated that the wireless reports got mixed up which led to the newspapers publishing the story wrong. The Carpathia was originally going to take the survivors to Halifax and there were reports in the cross-wires that a German oil tanker needed to be towed because it had run out of coal. It is possible that these reports got mixed up during the wireless traffic as everyone eagerly waited for news on the Titanic and reported the Titanic was being towed to Halifax by mistake. The idea that she could sink with heavy loss of life was unthinkable. She was after all the safest ship in the world. They were not prepared to think the worst and were very optimistic that she was quite safe. Even the officers on the Titanic did not believe she would go down when they lowered the lifeboats. e.g.

3rd officer Pitman
"We then cast the boat off and pulled away some safe distance from the ship. It was not for an hour that I realized she would go, an hour after we got into the water. I quite thought we would have to return to the ship again, perhaps at daylight. My idea was that if any wind sprang up we should drift away from the ship and have a job to get back again."

2nd officer Lightoller
"I did not think it was a serious accident......I told them it was merely a precaution and that very likely they would all be taken on board again at daylight.....No one believed the ship was actually in any danger. I'm afraid that my own confidence that she wouldn't or couldn't sink rather conveyed itself to others, for there were actually cases were women absolutely refused to be put in a boat."


.
I'm surprised that that didn't even go on more than it did the way radio worked at that time. And some time things got messed up not by accident. I remember reading that radio operators sometimes would get pissed at each other and intentionally jam each others signals.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

coal eater

Member
Mar 1, 2018
123
19
63
there was no any ships near titanic to take it on tow and even if titanic was trying reach halifax then not more than for 10-15 minutes then stopped forever,but yes the radio transmissions got mixed up extremely so it created confusion and incorrect informations were spread out
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Oct 28, 2000
3,242
548
388
News can be bent, twisted, and distorted -- as we all know -- but it always originates from somewhere. Where did the "All OK, Steaming for Halifax" story originate? Not who published it. The same basic story can be found in newspapers everywhere that had wire service. Some editors managed to "localize" the wire copy, but the story remains wire copy off the backbone network.

The queston that matters is "where and how, and who, and why did it originate?" Remember, one third of the headline was absolutely true -- Titanic did srike and iceberg -- and for a while the second part was also true, there had been no apparent death toll.

And, recall that the U.S. office of White Star Line in the person of Phillip A. S. Franklin operated until about 3 p.m. NYT as if Titanic had struck an iceberg, all were safe, and the ship was on its way slowly to Halifax. He even ordered up two passenger trains to go to Halifax for the purpose of bringing Titanic's passengers to New York. Check the record.

-- David G. Brown
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Rob Lawes

Member
Jun 13, 2012
1,187
734
208
England
Regarding the origin of the message, to the very best of my knowledge, there is no evidence from Cape Race or Cape Cod shore stations and in any of the PV's, or from the surviving Titanic radio operator that a message stating all OK and that the ship was making it's way to Halifax was ever sent from Titanic.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
May 3, 2005
2,599
289
278
That paper is not original 1912. Aside from the printing quality the image shown is of Olympic in New York in the early 1920s.
I am wondering how you can tell that paper is not original 1912 ?
I don't think you can tell this by the printing quality.
Pictures of the Olympic are often used for Titanic.
How can you tell it was of the 1920's ?
My apologies for being so skeptical, but why do you think it is not original ?
It looks like a common example of front pages on papers of that time ?

Those headlines were common in papers all over the USA.
One explanation I have read was that the garble was connected with the report of the disabled German tanker that was being towed to Halifax.
Another curiosity of those papers is that the report of the number of 1,470 that were saved is very close to the actual number of 1,500 that were lost ?
I wonder if the report might have also said that the number of lost (which would have been about
the difference of 712 ?) was actually the number that were saved and that could have been the cause for another garble in the news report of April 15, 1912 ?
 
Last edited:

Harland Duzen

Member
Jan 14, 2017
1,594
722
188
The main give-away for the top newspaper (dated April 15) is that the photo of Olympic has lifeboats the entire length of the Boat Deck and extra boats weren't added until after the disaster when Olympic arrival at Southampton and subsequent extra boats fitted and mutiny by the crew.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
May 3, 2005
2,599
289
278
Thanks very much !
And for your attention to the detail !
Some of the printing does not seem to match that of the rest.
The clothing of the persons in the photo (especially those of the women) also do look more 1920-ish than 1912-ish ?
On further close examination it looks like a case of copying and pasting on an old paper.
But why ?
Still curious as to the source and the reason for this not being the original ?

I would have to do some local research on this (I'm sort of an amateur historian nerd and do this from time to time.....LOL)
The Dallas Public Library has old newspapers on microfiche.....I'm going to have to check the front pages of The Dallas Morning News and The Dallas Times Herald (evening paper of that era) for April 15, 1912. They probably look about the same as all the others.
Fort Worth Star-Telegram , too !
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
May 3, 2005
2,599
289
278
Santa Ana Register dated April 15,1912 article says Titanic Ship was actually being towed back to land..Today this paper is called The Orange County Register...See One Article Attachment File..
Kim-
Do you know what was the source of this article ?
From the information that has turned up on close scrutiny it does seem curious.
As pointed out, the printing in the right column doesn't seem to match that of the rest of the paper and that photo seems to be of 1920's vintage....Olympic details, etc....especially the hats and clothing of the women in the photo.....those hats look like the women's "cloche hats" that were popular in the 1920's.........definitely not of 1912....those men's straw hats could be a "give way" too as to the date of the photo.

So I'd just be curious as to who made this article and who, why, when and what was the reason for it.

Maybe the Santa Ana Register had a time traveler that just went ahead to the 1920's and took the photo to accompany the article ? LOL
 
Last edited:
May 3, 2005
2,599
289
278
Also curious is that note at the upper right hand corner of the paper.
Was this from a resident of Santa Ana who had planned to take a trip on the Titanic ?
The note of "cancelled at the last moment" seems a bit curious.
Maybe he (or she) had saved the paper and wrote the comments some time later ?

That note and the other comments certainly are certainly a mystery - at least to this reader......LOL

My guess is that someone might have thought that doctoring up the front page with that photo would have made it look more authentic for selling copies at a profit to antique collectors . But their big goof was in adding that picture and certainly the fact that the photo was of the 1920's and not 1912 was their biggest goof. I wonder how many persons were taken in by this scam and how many copies were sold ? Was it on ebay ?
 
Last edited:

Kas01

Member
May 24, 2018
175
50
73
25
Probably a relative of someone who was traveling at the time and wanted an interesting story to tell the grandkids. You know, "Oh, your grandma? She was going to come home on Titanic but she had to cancel her reservation" or something along those lines.

Got more people who canceled their reservations than actually fit the liner, but I digress.
 
A

Aaron_2016

Guest
Back in those days stricken and damaged ships would make their way to Halifax by steam or by tow cable as it was the nearest port for repairs. The White Star Line may have assumed by the Titanic's track that she would head for Halifax. A bit like a plane that is sending a May Day on the radio and the people on the ground have to assume the plane will be making an emergency landing at the nearest airport. In Titanic's case it was Halifax.

News reports from that era. Halifax seemed to be the place to go.


papers_Halifax.png




The White Star officials in America may have had this kind of conversation:

Mr. X - "I regret we have received word that the Titanic has struck an iceberg and is taking on water, sir."
Mr. Y. - "That is a shame. She has a fine crew. The pumps of course will handle the situation."
Mr. X - "What shall I tell the press? They are waiting outside."
Mr. Y - "She will obviously need to come in for repairs. I doubt Captain Smith will take her to New York."
Mr. X - "There was talk on the wireless about a vessel needing a tow to Halifax." (German oil tanker)
Mr. Y - "That clearly must be them. Tell the press she is heading for Halifax."
Mr. X - "Yes, sir."


.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
A

Aaron_2016

Guest
Here is a combination of the Halifax news reports and the immediate reactions of the public. Nobody wanted to believe the safest ship in the world had gone down on her maiden voyage.




.
 
May 3, 2005
2,599
289
278
Santa Ana Register dated April 15,1912 article says Titanic Ship was actually being towed back to land..Today this paper is called The Orange County Register...See One Article Attachment File..
Background on the origin of the fake front page would be interesting.
Was it made sometime in the 1920's ?
In other words, where and when did it come from ?
Judging from the photo, it is obviously a fake, and the photo would seem to indicate that it was made sometime later - at least in the 1920's - definitely not in 1912.
 
Last edited:
May 3, 2005
2,599
289
278
Correction to the above. :
The photo itself is not a fake in itelf of course.
It is obviously a genuine photo made of the Olympic some time in the 1920's.
But pasting the photo on the front page of an old newspaper and trying to pass it off as of the Titanic in 1912 is a fake.........???

Still........The Question is.......Why ?

My spouse says I read too much Sherlock Holmes. LOL
But, as Holmes would say about this, "Watson, This is most curious. But as to the fake........Elementary , my dear Watson !"........ LOL
 
Last edited:

Similar threads

Similar threads