TITANIC semiworking REPLICA could in fact be built

OK, clearly a fully functional sailing Titanic can't be built today, but here's an idea for anyone with the resources.
You could build a full-size Titanic, and have it as a tourist attraction/hotel (a la Queen Mary in Long Beach). You wouldn't need coal and boilers, perhaps no real engines at all, or maybe one room of fake boilers for looks.
You could have one really furnished deck of first-class staterooms, one of 2nd, one level of 3rd, or maybe just one deck with all 3 combined. Some questions would have to be determined by those who know the hotel business.
Also a fake bridge, Capt Smith's quarters--maybe fake rivets, perhaps movable water-tight doors--basically a lot more than in any exhibit, but not really a fully functional ship. Hell, maybe they even could flood a portion at 11:40 pm, for those with morbid tastes. I could imagine any number of parties.
It may sound crazy, but I remember discussions when Cameron was spending an unheard-of $200 Million to make his film. Who would'a thunk?

Considering the popularity of the exhibits, with a tiny fraction of what a pseudo-replica would show, I suspect it be educational and profitable.

And before I go to bed, you could even work something out with Clear Channel / RMS Titanic for a portion of the ship/hotel to also include exhibi stuff.

And think of the gift shop? T shirts? My cousin died on the Titanic and all he left me was this lousy T-shirt?

I hope someone with money reads this note, runs with it, and remembers to be Mike Disch some credit.
Hey! an additional idea--actors to play Capt Smith, Molly Brown, certain other passengers. Keep me in mind.
Enough already.
 
Hey Mike, This is a fantastic idea, I myself have entertained a similar notions for a dry-docked hotel, or even a water line up full scale hotel, say in New York, think of the revenue! A friend of mine who is well off has had a huge house built recently and had his foyer done up to be an exact replica of the Grand Staircase complete with the wrought iron dome! He won't tell me what it set him back but it must have been a fortune, especially with just the woodwork alone!
 
I recall that San Fransisco had a very similar idea just a couple of years ago. Then reality set in once they saw how much it would really cost and the project died befor it ever even got off the ground.

>>It may sound crazy, but I remember discussions when Cameron was spending an unheard-of $200 Million to make his film. Who would'a thunk? <<

That $200,000,000+ bought a wooden mockup built over a scaffolding framework that was nothing more then a hollowed out movie prop. It was effectively destroyed by the sinking scenes as well as a limited number of sets which were likewise trashed and for the most part ended up on a bonfire. Yes, the movie made a whopping profit, but this was as much good timing as anything else and a near run thing at that. The studios backing the film nearly pulled the plug when they saw how the overruns were going.

>>Considering the popularity of the exhibits, with a tiny fraction of what a pseudo-replica would show, I suspect it be educational and profitable. <<

A questionable premise. Some exhibets are muddling along quite nicely, but let's not forget that RMSTI...which presents a lot of them...has been consistantly in the red for years. And all they have are the display cases and artifacts. Not a semi-working or non-working replica.
 
A hotel in Las Vegas has been suggested, but I think that's iffy, because you're in competition with guys giving away rooms to attract gamblers. The mere novelty at a family theme park destination (the Anaheim cluster[sup]1[/sup], for example) would keep it filled up. I haven't run the numbers, but my gut feel is that if you could build it for $200 million, you could make money.

[sup]1[/sup] Disneyland, Knott's Berry Farm, Universal, etc.
 
>>A hotel in Las Vegas has been suggested, but I think that's iffy, because you're in competition with guys giving away rooms to attract gamblers.<<

I agree. In just about any compitition in that town, the slot machines usually win out. I have to admit, the idea of a theme park setting has a certain appeal. I don't know if it would make money, but it would be a lot more practical and realistic then any of the Titanic replica schemes which have come and gone over the past 6 years.
 
"A friend of mine who is well off has had a huge house built recently and had his foyer done up to be an exact replica of the Grand Staircase complete with the wrought iron dome!"

Brian--

Are there any pictures of this friend's foyer available anywhere? I would love to see that.

--Mike Mc
 
Hey Mike,

You are in luck, I do have a picture with my friend standing prominently on the stairs while his wife stands above at the rail, both in 1912 period dress. Unfortunately, it is too large to post here and I cannot link to it, I can email it to you though.

Brian
 
Hi Brian,

I'd love to see the picture! You could email it to me at:
yello_armadillo#yahoo.com (Change the # to @.)

I couldn't afford to build the Grand Staircase, so I decided to settle on the aft one -- on the computer. Still quite a task in itself, but the price was right! Got a long way to go yet...

http://www.geocities.com/yello_armadillo/Titanic/temp/RAIL05.JPG
http://www.geocities.com/yello_armadillo/Titanic/temp/RAILGLD5.JPG

It would be great to see your friend's real reproduction, complete with period attire.

--Mike Mc
 
Chris--

Thanks. I originally did the dome, before the room itself. Here's a view of that:
http://www.geocities.com/yello_armadillo/Titanic/temp/DOMROOM3.JPG (walls are temporary in that view) All the iron pieces are actual models, not some painted-on artwork. Here's an early closeup:
http://www.geocities.com/yello_armadillo/Titanic/temp/DOME12.JPG

The program is Autodesk 3D Studio, Release 3, an old DOS program that came out in about 1994. It cost a bundle then, even with an educational discount. It was pretty hi-end at the time. It is the grandfather of today's 3D Studio MAX, which I can't afford, unfortunately. Still, the old program is very good for making complex modeling. Does animations, too. It was the originator of the standard .3DS file format for computer models, and they can be brought into modern 3D programs.
These are just quick and dirty renderings to check out the progress of the construction, since all work is done in a wireframe mode.

I originally ran it just fine on a 486 with 16 megs of RAM!

--Mike Mc
 
Don't know -- I'm not done yet! ;o)
Several months of long nights have been spent on both the dome and the room so far. (They are two separate files right now, since both are about 500,000 polygons each. They can be combined for rendering.) The ironwork on the railings is the hardest part. The railing is getting so complex that I should probably separate that into a separate file from the room.
Without plans, a large part of it is trying to figure out the size/angles of things from photos, so they all line up right and look proportional.

--Mike Mc
 
If you did build a replica,then you would have to include everything. Even without one little detail, it's still wouldn't be Titanic. Plus if it were to be completed there's only one place it could possibly be berthed.
Southampton.
 
More likely the builders since the ship would never be allowed to get underway. Even if it could be done, can you imagine trying to find enough people still above ground as opposed to under it who would know how to operate her?
 
I have heard that the Titanic's blueprints were destroyed during World War II. So how are they going to build a 100% exact replica of the Titanic?
 
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