Titanic Survivor Called Williams??


Q

Queensisland

Guest
Hi, I am trying to unravel a mystery relating to a Titanic survivor. I have a letter mentioning a male passenger who travelled to Canada from Britain in 1913. During the voyage he gave a lecture relating to how he had survived the Titanic wreck one year previous and how he had been in the water for over 3hours and then picked up by Carpathia. He also mentions that his only sister died from shock prior to receiving his marconigram stating that he had survived. The letter refers to this man as Mr Williams and it appears that his forename may have been Evan. There are only three male survivors named Williams and none have the forename of Evan. Either this man was an incredible showman and lier or there is some mix up relating to his name. Does anyone have any ideas????
 
Q

Queensisland

Guest
Titanic Survivor Williams

Thanks for your comments, it is quite interesting to think that this man may have had the nerve to actually lecture on his Titanic experiences if he wasn't actually there, surely someone would have found him out. Anyway it is worth some more digging into. Thanks Again
 
T

thomas golembiewski

Guest
Chicago Examiner, September 25, 1912, p. 2, c. 3:

REFORMED ON TITANIC TELLS OF THE WRECK
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Former Gambler Describes Heroic Acts in a Lecture in Willard Hall
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A professional gambler, reformed by his experience on the sinking Titanic, David A. Williams, a second cabin survivor, told last night in Willard Hall of the scenes following the crash.

"I embarked at Southampton," he said, "I have been a gambler and a thief all my life, and I had made many ocean voyages, preying on passengers in the card room. My experience on the Titanic made a convert of me. When the collision with the iceberg occurred I was playing cards. I landed in New York only to learn of the death of my sister, my only surviving relative. Since then I have not had a playing card in my hand."

An account of the heroism of John Jacob Astor, Mr. and Mrs. Isidor Straus and William T. Stead, the journalist, was given by the lecturer.

"John Jacob Astor was pushed by one of the officers into a lifeboat in which Mrs. Astor was seated," he said. "Just as the boat was about to be lowered a half-clad woman rushed from the steerage. Colonel Astor arose, tipped his hat, assisted the woman to his place and returned to the deck.

"I got in a boat, but was pulled out. I was washed from the deck, but was picked up by a boat from the Carpathia.

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