Titanic - The 1912 History Edition (no Jack & Rose)


A new "fanedit" has been created that completely removes the fictional Jack and Rose love story, leaving what really happened to Titanic, with historical characters as dramatised by James Cameron. It also restores deleted scenes of historical moments including the officers and the nearby ship, the Californian and the arrival of the Carpathia. Finally it has a new colour grade, correcting a green hue present in the Bluray and DVD versions of the film:

Titanicmovie_small.jpg


You can view a trailer of the concept here:

For more information on the "fanedit", Q&A and examples of the colour grade, please visit the webpage here:
Titanic: The 1912 History Edition
 
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Arun Vajpey

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I would be interested to see this, but where is it (going to be) available?

Mind you, completely cutting out Jack & Rose from the footage might compromise several important scenes during the latter part of the sinking. A cleverer edit would be to include them in crucial scenes but just like a pair of ordinary passengers like those around them.
 

Arun Vajpey

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Thanks. I watched it and it was good considering the difficult editing task involved.
 
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Jun 3, 2020
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I would be interested to see this, but where is it (going to be) available?

Mind you, completely cutting out Jack & Rose from the footage might compromise several important scenes during the latter part of the sinking. A cleverer edit would be to include them in crucial scenes but just like a pair of ordinary passengers like those around them.
he doesn’t cut out jack and rose entirely. just their love story. they’re now “supporting characters” as they are in the footage, just not prominently.
 

Eric Paddon

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I'll certainly give this a look because I could never handle sitting through the movie proper again in my life.
 
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Nov 14, 2005
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It was sarc. There is or was a christian movie site that used to cut out all the naughty bits of movies. I can understand where they are coming from and don't have a problem with it as long as they get the ok from the original movie makers. It is somebody elses work after all. But maybe its not an issue legally as tv stations do it all the time...I.E...reformatted to fit the screen...edited for time..ect.
 

Eric Paddon

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I sat through it and strangely, even without all the nonsense I found that what Cameron did when sticking to the real history was still done so much better in ANTR and SOS Titanic.
 

Arun Vajpey

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I don't agree. When ANTR was made in 1955, the wreck was still 30 years away from being discovered and so they did not have the material that Cameron had access to in his 1997 film. Also, ANTR was made on a limited budget and even for 1955 the 'special effects' were very poor. Perhaps worst of all IMO was the concentrated effort to make More's Lightoller character the hero.

But for all that, ANTR had its heart in the right place and (Lightoller's characterization apart) took the necessary semi-documentary approach. Cameron could have produced a classic using a similar approach with all the finances, information material and technical facilities at his disposal. Yet he chose to turn the film into a cloying boy-meets-girl romance which turned out to be the central part of the script. For me, that was an unpardonable sin for which no amount of realistic special effects or factual presentation of some events could make up.
 

Eric Paddon

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I agree that Cameron benefited from knowing the real history of how the ship broke in two and could depict that. But getting a reminder of the "Murdoch suicide" bit and comparing how he filmed scenes like Andrews explanation that the ship was going to sink or the interactions of Bride/Phillips compared to how we saw them filmed in ANTR, I found that Cameron's direction and staging of scenes like that fell remarkably flat. And when he more directly copycatted ANTR like the depiction of the band members, the ANTR version also came out as more effective from a cinematic standpoint IMO. (and I will never forgive Cameron for not letting Maggie Brown talk back to Hitchens and threaten to pitch him overboard)
 

Arun Vajpey

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And when he more directly copycatted ANTR like the depiction of the band members, the ANTR version also came out as more effective from a cinematic standpoint IMO.
As far as the band is concerned, I do not believe anyone has or will be able to depict scenes close to what most likely happened. The problem IMO is that music has a strange effect on the human mind and a very common effect, specially in stressful situations, is a confusion during later recollection about how long people continued to hear it. There is a tendency to continue to 'hear' the music long after it has ceased, which explains why survivors like Bride, Steward Brown etc felt that the band played music till the end. Also, this phenomenon has significant individual variations, which explains which there were so many differences in survivor reports about how long the band played. We should also add the tendency to embellishment in survivor accounts in order to make the band members' efforts sound more poignant.

In reality therefore, irrespective of what some survivor accounts said, I feel that the band stopped playing a long time before the Titanic's final plunge, perhaps around 01:30 am. By then everyone on board, including the band members, would know that the ship (and with it, themselves) did not have much time left and so priorities would have shifted quickly with onus on chances of self-preservation. That change in the minds' perspectives would have also brought forth another phenomenon which almost all of us have experienced in everyday situations - a point where music gradually ceases to be soothing and starts to get intrusive. Another related point is that such a change in perspective is influenced greatly by the individual's personality, which in turn explains the significant differences about the "music timeline" as the Titanic sank.
 

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