Titanic: The Musical

Dec 8, 2000
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Thanks for the link, Mark. Supa Productions, an ACT based amateur music theatre company, have quite a good reputation. They're only just auditioning, so we've a bit of time to plan a field trip - if there's any interest? Time to revisit the 'Let's meet' forum, methinks.
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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Oh dear...I have great memories of sitting around on the floor of the East End flat with Jemma and Ben, blaring in unison 'How dare you Smith! I will not stand here indicted...who ignored warnings of icebergs when sighted?!' Think Ben and I sung a few songs on another occasion when the CD was skipping around.

Hrm. Perhaps should pop down to Canberra for this.
 
Jun 19, 2004
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I saw Titanic the Musical when it was in Boston probably around the time that it first came out. As it was at The Wang Center (A fairly large theater) the sets were pretty elaborate. If I remember correctly the poop deck area of the ship was on hydraulics to aid in the sinking.

-Shannon
 

Damon Hill

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Jun 13, 2004
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I am the set designer for the theatre company I am involved in and at a party last night someone asked me if I would like to Assistant Direct a production of Titanic in 2007...I said I'd love to of course! It has to be approved by the committee first and the rights obtained, so fingers crossed!
 

Eric Paddon

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Jun 4, 2002
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Good luck and I hope it will come off for you! I'm glad to see stories of how the musical continues to enjoy a good post-Broadway life with theater companies around the world.
 

Nina Darcy

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Dec 30, 2004
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I just saw a super amateur production in Kitchener, Ontario. It was one of the best shows I've ever seen in my life. Terrific! I understand it's still playing on Broadway with a lot of the original cast. Nice to hear that several people have seen it there. What did you think of their production? Is it worth the trip? I'm seriously considering it!

In answer to the question about smaller scale productions of the musical, the one I saw was about as minimalist as you can go, and that was a brilliant addition to the show. The sets were composed solely of one black staircase in the centre and two moveable sloped platforms, representing all different areas of the ship, and then finally converting into the lifeboats. The sinking was represented by dancers fluttering blue fabric behind them and draping it around the set and actors. As for costumes, all the actors wore black shirts and pants, and then donned either red, green, or brown vests, depending on class, or jackets, to portray crew members.

I found that the simple productions gave just enough of an impression of what they were meant to represent to keep the audience from getting confused, but allowed the music and the story to come through as much as possible. I'd love to see a big budget production to see the spectacle of it all, but I don't know if you can get any better than what they did!
 

Eric Paddon

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Jun 4, 2002
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The show's Broadway run was from April 1997 to April 1999 (804 performances total).

I was fortunate to see it four times on Broadway (once in previews) and each time was a rewarding experience.
 

Nina Darcy

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Dec 30, 2004
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Oh dear, did it really close already? Darn, what a shame. Does anyone know where it's currently running in the Ontario/New York/Michigan/Illinois area?
 

Eric Paddon

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Jun 4, 2002
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There isn't any kind of database to find out where a particular vintage show is being performed by a local theater company. Like any classic show you just have to hope it comes to some place nearby at some point.

Even though "Titanic" was not an easy production to mount in New York with the massive three level set, the fact that other companies continue to perform it shows how any company can mount a more technically feasible version to suit their needs.

You can view a videorecording of the Broadway production at the Lincoln Center Library in Manhattan (along with any Broadway production of the last twenty years) but copying or loaning out of material isn't allowed.
 
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sharon rutman

Guest
Any thoughts out there about Titanic, the Musical? In all the hoopla surrounding the l997 Cameron blockbuster, Titanic by Peter Stone (one of my all time heroes) and Maury Yeston was practically swamped. I saw it 4 times and thought it was real eye candy! After all, Titanic the Musical also fueled Titanic mania by winning 5 Tonys including Best Musical. How cool was that.
 
Mar 5, 2001
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Titanic was a great Musical. I saw it here in germany 52 Times and i love it. It is my Favorit Musical. My next Favorits are "Dance of the Vampires" (the German original Verion is total different to the Broadway Version) and the "Mamma Mia". I make the official websites from three of the German Titanic Cast members Jessica Kessler (Kate Mullins, www.JessicaKessler.de), Paul Walthaus (George Widener, www.Paul Walthaus.de) and Wolfgang Hoeltzel (Murdoch, www.wolfgang-hoeltzel.de).
 
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sharon rutman

Guest
Jason--I'm technically challenged, what can I say. Now I'm going to take a chance and go ethnic--Titanic the Musical is the first Jewish oriented film or stage adaptation to Titanic's story. How do I know this? Well, Isidor Strauss gets all the good lines and at the end of "Still" he does something every Jew in the audience recognizes--he breaks the champange glass with his foot. That's the end of the Jewish wedding ceremony--the groom traditionally breaks a small shot glass with his foot.
 
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Kate Williams

Guest
How true is Titanic - The Musical? I am about to begin floor rehearsals and have become a little obsessed about the subject matter. There are many things true to life (or at least what we know) and many things totally wrong. I die in the show but lived in real life for example!
In the show, Frederick Barrett (which one of the two he is supposed to be I don't know) sends a telegram, free of charge thanks to Bride, to his girlfriend in England asking her to marry him. Does anyone know if this is true or if it is based on some sort of fact? The reason I ask is that he sends it to Darlene in Bilsthorpe, Nottinghamshire and although Bilsthorpe is well known in Nottingham as a coal mining community, I doubt that a broadway composer or writer would ever have heard of the place or am I not giving them credit for some seriously detailed research work?

Any thoughts?

Kate x
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Hallo, Kate. The Broadway writers should be credited with seriously creative imaginations rather than seriously detailed research, but I wouldn't blame them for that as long as the entertainment is good! I don't know which Fred Barrett they chose, but the better known of the two is the leading fireman who survived and was an important witness at the Inquiries following the disaster. That Fred was from Liverpool. You'll find a good photo of him, and an interesting insight into his private life (see post by Brian Ticehurst, 19 May), in this thread:

https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/discus/messages/5666/95712.html#POST151657

Many of the other characters in the Show have names borrowed from real passengers but otherwise have nothing at all in common with them - the Beanes, for instance. Will you be backstage, or did you land a role?
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Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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To avoid confusion: there are several photos on that page, but the only authentic one of Fred Barrett is that which is pasted into an orange coloured id card.
 
Mar 5, 2001
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The source Material which was used by Peter Stone & Maury Yeston was Walter Lords "A Night to Remember" this you can see when you know the book and the musical good.

I have read the book serval Times and see the musical more than 50 times.

the gambler Jay Yates for example can be find in Lords book but not in the most other books because he was not on Titanic.

But the most obvious example for the Lord Book is "Charlotte Cardoza". Her Name was "Charlotte Drake Cardeza" but Lord make an mistake and wrote "Cardoza" so the lady in the Musical is named Cardoza.

Little Funny Story by the way: Here in Germany is in the Musical Theatre "Neue Flora" where Titanic played from 2002 to 2003 at this time opened an Restaurant and they named it "Cardoza`s".

In the meantime the Restaurant is closed because they have to high prices and to low portion on the plate`s.
 
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Kate Williams

Guest
Hi Guys,

Thanks for the replies. I will try and see what I can find and if I come up with anything I will put the information up. We have an appeal for information going in our local paper so that I can put local interest stuff in the programme. Hoping to get some interesting stuff that will be of use.

Rehearsals are sounding fab it's very exciting. I am playing Kate Murphey which is really good fun although pleased to hear that she really survived!

Will let you know if I get anything interesting from the research!

Kate x
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Kate, if you're looking for Titanic people who came from the Nottingham area I think the closest you'll get among the passengers is Mrs Emily Nichols, who travelled 1st Class but only as far as Queenstown in Ireland, so she missed out on the main feature! She was from Retford.

William Moss, Head Steward in the 1st Class dining room, was from Cotham. Steward Albert Lane, who also served in the dining room, was from Radford. William Caunt, a grille cook in the 1st Class kitchens, was from Lenton. All three died and their bodies were not identified among those recovered.

Note that all these Nottinghamshire people were strictly First Class!
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