Titanic: The Musical

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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One other connection - the cargo which went down with the Titanic included a consignment of Nottingham lace.
 
Sep 26, 2009
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One of the "Katie's" in the musical was Katie Gilnagh, married name Katherine Manning. She arrived in New York and no one met her. She went home to find a wake going on inside--her own! She came to our first general meeting of the Titanic Enthusiasts of America in 1966 at the Seaman's Church Institute, along with Walter Lord, Washington Dodge, and Frank Goldsmith and his wife. I talked to Katherine Manning on the telephone before she died. Robert H. Gibbons
 
K

Kate Williams

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Thanks for all the new information. You've all been brilliant! I've managed to fill a few pages with Nottingham Info!

Kate x
 

Deborah Kogan

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Jan 29, 2003
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Thorsten:
Thank you for telling me how the Cardeza/Cardoza mistake was made. I always thought it was because the family wanted privacy in respect to the Titanic. I live in Philadelphia in the U.S., and the Cardeza family was famous here. The hematology department of the hospital where I worked was named after them.
 

Paul Lee

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Aug 11, 2003
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This musical is playing some locations in the UK. Is there a complete list of tour dates?

Thanks

Paul
 
Aug 3, 2007
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The Youth Theatre Players in my Town is doing the Titanic Musical this summer! our show is in two week. I'm playing Marion Thayer. (I've found this site really helpful, especially because our director had us do a history project on our characters.)

As wonderful as the show is, there is no doubt that there are some historical flubs. Or, creative license was taken, if you'd like to say that. For instance, Kate McGowan, who did NOT have a love affair with Jim Farrell, (even though it's cute) or Jack Thayer, who was seventeen instead of nine.

Of course, I'm loving the entire experience. I could go on and on about it, but I won't.

Has any one else here had the privilege of actually being in the show?
 

Deborah Kogan

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Jan 29, 2003
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Titanic: The Musical is coming to southern New Jersey, across from Philadelphia. It will be playing at the Ritz Theatre Company (not to be confused with the Ritz movie multiplex) in Haddon Township, NJ at 915 White Horse Pike. Their zip code is 08107. The production is scheduled to run from October 18 to November 17, 2007. The Box Office number is 1-856-858-5230. Their web address is www.ritztheatreco.org ...This should be convenient to those living in the tri-state area. I believe that there are matinees on Sundays. That's when I will go!
 

Ryan Thompson

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Dec 6, 2005
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Anybody else kind of disgusted somebody would write a musical about this, and then some other people would think it was okay to go ahead with it?

"2200 people died! Lets sing and dance! Oh boy!"

Not interested.
 
Feb 4, 2007
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Hi Ryan,

Actually, having seen the NY Broadway tour of the show live in Chicago quite a few years ago, I thought it was rather well done. All characters were actually REAL passengers who were on the Titanic. It was very passenger-story oriented, from boiler stoker on up to the Strauss couple. Ok, ok, so it IS a musical, but I found it rather tasteful (for a Titanic story-telling) - very UNlike the big JC film "Titanic". Real people, relatively real stories, and live faces and actions to sometimes obscure names.

Just my impression.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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And, as the last hit musical to date that was not an adaptation of a movie, a TV show, or the works of a pop act from the 1960s or 1970s, it rather marks the passing of an era.
happy.gif


As Jason said, the various storylines are handled tastefully and respectfully. The principal flaw with Titanic: The Musical, is that the music is pleasant but unmemorable. Not bad~ you won't find yourself tempted to walk out at intermission, as I did at Into The Light (the big budget musical about carbon dating the Shroud of Turin)or Annie II: Miss Hannigan's Revenge~ and you won't find yourself questioning your sanity for attending, as I did during Amy Fisher: The Musical ("Now my name will be known from North to South. And you, bitch, will speak out the side of your mouth" a sample lyric) or Annie II: Miss Hannigan's Revenge ~ and you won't find yourself hating your fellow man for inflicting something so unspeakably awful upon the world, as I did during Annie II: Miss Hannigan's Revenge (which closed in out-of-town-tryouts, god be praised, never to be sen on Broadway)~ BUT you will not be compelled to rush out and buy the cast album after you see the play.
 

Ryan Thompson

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Dec 6, 2005
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Hmm. A Hindenburg musical, well-written, could do pretty well on that note, then.

A musical about when the Shroud of Turin was carbon-dated? That doesn't even make sense.

Was the Amy Fisher musical a comedy? If the show doesn't take itself seriously, albeit dumb, it gets a pass.

I'd never heard of an Annie II. But yeah, it sounds bad. I've seen parts of the movie they made from the first story, and I don't really care for it. It would have put me in a diabetic coma if I hadn't changed the channel.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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Hindenburg, the Musical? Could be done on the cheap, like Mama Mia, by using established 'feel good' tunes that will lodge in the audience's head for weeks after. I see an opening number, full cast, lots of color, lots of frenetic choreography, built around "Up Up And Away In My Beautiful Balloon"


Lusitania the Musical?

"Now sit right back and you'll hear a tale~
A tale of a fateful trip~
that started out in Old New York
aboard a Cunard ship....

...the fog, it started getting thick
the captain, he got lost.
And so, despite the Ad-mral-teeee
he hove in towards the coast.

...with Margaret Galligan,
the skipper too,
some millionaires
and their wives.
Two movie stars
a professor and
158 Amer-i-CAAANS...."

>A musical about when the Shroud of Turin was carbon-dated? That doesn't even make sense.

Oh...it was INSPIRATIONAL. Hard bitten non-believer wants to prove that the Shroud of Turin is not the burial shroud of christ, and instead finds true faith he ne'er knew he possessed. I walked out at intermission.

>I'd never heard of an Annie II.

Failed in out-of-town tryouts. I have a warped souvenir of it, somewhere. We taped some cheesy "Scream Pretty Peggy" type of horror film, circa 1988, and inadvertantly taped the final 5 minutes of Entertainment Tonight. The segment was about Annie 2, and the little girl who played Annie struck both of us as being a WORSE Tammi Marihugh and utterly UTTTERLY resistible. The segment showed her getting her pretty hair chopped off down to "butch" length to accomodate the red afro wig (short hair made her look like an evil leprechaun) and saying "It's worth it for the part." Two days later, the plug was pulled on this horror of a play, and no doubt the Tammi clone was stuck fielding "junior lesbian" jokes about that scapling she took, until it grew out a year or so later....
happy.gif
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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>I wouldn't have even bothered buying the ticket

No choice. I was taking a two-semester class in Theatre Criticism and, subsequently, saw nearly everything in "preview" (free tickets) that opened between September 1987 and June 1988.

Aside from The Colored Museum, little of note opened that year. But the Shroud of Turin musical was the one that scarred me.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>No choice. I was taking a two-semester class in Theatre Criticism and, subsequently, saw nearly everything in "preview" (free tickets) that opened between September 1987 and June 1988.<<

Jeeze, which one of the 30,000+ gods in our diverse pantheons did you have to honk off to get stuck with that? All of them? (Or was it a really sadistic streak your teacher had?)

I noticed that this "hit" only had six performances...which I suspect was seven too many.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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Well...it was Darwinism. If a play had "hit" written all over it, the preview tickets were valuable. If the play had an aura of doom about it, then preview tickets would be comped to theatrical journalism classes...theatre classes...people who had seen a theatre...people who could spell theatre...halfway houses...anything to get backsides in the seats to generate advance buzz.

1986 was a bad year for NYC theatre. I recall writing a scathing review of:

http://www.ibdb.com/production.php?id=4433

which was, basically, Drop Dead Gorgeous if it had been a musical....and unfunny.

Smile, 'though, has pleasant connotations. I was at a record launch party in the East Village for one of the more notorious downtown acts that nite with my good friend Mary Jane, and arrived at Smile in the final stages of blissful incoherence. Sadly, by the time the curtain rose I was more cognizant of my surroundings and worse....far worse....remembered the play the following day. I still remember it. And curse it with each breath I draw....
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>If the play had an aura of doom about it, then preview tickets would be comped to theatrical journalism classes...theatre classes...people who had seen a theatre...people who could spell theatre...halfway houses...anything to get backsides in the seats to generate advance buzz.<<

Maybe they were hoping that students were just dumb enough not to recognize a turkey when they see it. A bad bet. "Smile" at least survived a bit longer. (Which says nothing good about how bad The Light must have been.)
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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I'm only sorry I walked out of Into the Light
before the opening of Act 2:

Fede, Fede .............................. Don Cesare, Archbishop Parisi and Team

but I think seeing that listed in Playbill was what drove me out.

It DID star Dean Jones, of Million Dollar Duck and Herbie the Love Bug fame. So, was it a career high or a career low?
 

Ryan Thompson

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Dec 6, 2005
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Oh...it was INSPIRATIONAL. Hard bitten non-believer wants to prove that the Shroud of Turin is not the burial shroud of christ, and instead finds true faith he ne'er knew he possessed. I walked out at intermission.

Yeah. I'm with Michael on that one: I'd have never bought the ticket.