Dec 2, 2000
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Barrett said this to the U.S. Senate:

"Q. This tear went a couple of feet past the bulkhead in No. 5. How were you able to keep the water from reaching? - A. It never came above the plates, until all at once I saw a wave of green foam come tearing through between the boilers and I jumped for the escape ladder."

From the Mersey Wreck Commission:

"1891. Very well?
- The ship was torn right through here. (Indicating on the plan.) I consulted Mr. Shepherd and Mr. Hesketh about the hole being in this bunker, and that was the farthest aft the ship was torn. This is a watertight compartment, and the ship was torn from there to there. That is in the next section.

1892. (The Solicitor-General.) What do you call that section?
- No. 5."

With the breech extending into Boiler Room Five's coal bunker, it would have to be those bunker walls would been what was holding the water back. Since it wasn't a structural bulkhead, the only question was not IF it would give up the ghost but when.
 
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Barrett said this to the U.S. Senate:

"Q. This tear went a couple of feet past the bulkhead in No. 5. How were you able to keep the water from reaching? - A. It never came above the plates, until all at once I saw a wave of green foam come tearing through between the boilers and I jumped for the escape ladder."

From the Mersey Wreck Commission:

"1891. Very well?
- The ship was torn right through here. (Indicating on the plan.) I consulted Mr. Shepherd and Mr. Hesketh about the hole being in this bunker, and that was the farthest aft the ship was torn. This is a watertight compartment, and the ship was torn from there to there. That is in the next section.

1892. (The Solicitor-General.) What do you call that section?
- No. 5."

With the breech extending into Boiler Room Five's coal bunker, it would have to be those bunker walls would been what was holding the water back. Since it wasn't a structural bulkhead, the only question was not IF it would give up the ghost but when.
I was interested in your post and wanted to see that diagram. But the link didn't work for me. Not sure if its just my machine as I have Java disabled. But I stripped the link down so it works for my machine. I'll post it below if thats not a problem in case somebody else has the same problem.. The diagram is a good one and makes it clearer.

 
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That gif showed up very well. I know the layout of the ship well enough to know where the fire was located, but for those who don't, it would give a very useful perspective.

It also shows why to so-called evidence in "The New Evidence" is so much bovine excrement. The vaunted discolouration is too far forward.
 
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That gif showed up very well. I know the layout of the ship well enough to know where the fire was located, but for those who don't, it would give a very useful perspective.

It also shows why to so-called evidence in "The New Evidence" is so much bovine excrement. The vaunted discolouration is too far forward.
Yeah I agree. I didn't put it in such a colorful way but I refered to it as "The New Made Up Evidence" earlier in this thread or maybe it was another one. Plus there were other smudges that they didn't address...as in what were the causes of those one's?
 
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A lot of those smudges were tricks of the light and developmental anomalies which were common in the photography of the era and still are even today. You can see them on other period liners which were photographed under similar conditions and from similar angles.

The one on the Titanic which is alleged to be "The smoking gun" is in the region of the cargo hold. Nobody complained about conflagrations there either, and I suspect that a few irritated passengers might have said something about it if there was!
 
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Gamelyn Chase

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Very well put Michael.
Senan Molony is to be congratulated on successfully pulling the wool over the eyes of TV commissioning editors, among others. The UK’s Channel More4 scheduled his purported ‘new evidence’ no less than three times in as many weeks, and I’m sure it’s still lurking out there. The Titanic continues to hold the position of that ship about which the most tendentious baloney has been written, spoken and depicted, and Mr Molony’s entertaining peregrination is no exception to this rule.

Had he taken the trouble to look at the vessel’s profile plan (he is an ‘expert’, after all), he would have noticed there was a centreline bunkering hatch in way of his newfound black patch on the hull plating. That black patch could have been attributable to such as coal dust, abrasions from the loading skips, or a touch up paint job consequent thereupon. Instead, as others have exhaustively pointed out, he opportunistically translates his precious patch downwards and afterwards on the profile to make it coincident with a bunker fire.

Furthermore, he asserts the vessel was speeded up because she was running short of coal; this, regardless of the basic principle that for every increment of speed there is a consequent exponential increase in fuel consumption – a characteristically ‘Irish’ solution to the vessel’s predicament, would one not agree?

And again furthermore, he seeks to sensationalise the fact that most of the crew engaged in Belfast left the ship in Southampton. I hesitate to disabuse him of his standpoint, but the Belfast-Southampton passage was a Home Trade (Eng 4) ‘Run’ paid off in Southampton – and Runners, by both definition and inclination, are loath to sign on voyage Articles (ENG 1).

Mercenary sensationalising of the Titanic casualty is nothing new; it started with Walter Lord and culminated, climactically, with James Cameron’s purple depicture. This present 'expert’s' attempted latter-day hatchet job on the management of the White Star Line has only served to highlight his coruscating ineptitude when it comes to the detail of maritime matters.
 
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