Titanic the ship that never sank

James Hill

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Feb 20, 2002
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anyone read this i would give it okay cause its a little far from the truth
a few examples (the author is Robin Gardiner)
he says that...
officers were shooting passengers in order to get attention.
the ALC restraunt staff were detaned in the 2nd class dining room.
and how should i say this
explains how she might not have struck an iceberg at all it could have been a sailing vessel,tramp steamer or auxiliry cruiser?not to mention the Olmpic Titanic insurance scam story which when the wreck was discoverd proved untrue.i would not recomend this book to much but i would to experts to point out rights and wrongs. decide for yourself.however i am recomending his brilliant History Of The White Star Line im half way through it exelent a book for everyone the best thing you can get if you are researching on the line.
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Hi James!

however i am recomending his brilliant History Of The White Star Line im half way through it exelent a book for everyone the best thing you can get if you are researching on the line.

Are you *sure*? Believe me, take some of Gardiner's 'fact's with a pinch of salt, especially those on the Majestic (II). You'd do better with Paul Louden-Brown's work.

One real annoyance is the use of 'Majestic[sup]2[/sup]' rather than the proper numeral.

You may find this thread of interest:

https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/discus/messages/5671/7695.html?1009986593

Best regards,

Mark.
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
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Gardiner's books should be treated as the composer Anton Bruckner treated a review of one of his works. He wrote to the critic----

Sir,

I am sitting in the smallest room of my house.
I have your review before me.
It will soon be behind me.

A sad feature of the Titanic scene is the ease with which the most nonsensical material can be published.
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Hi Dave!

You make a good point here:
quote:

'A sad feature of the Titanic scene is the ease with which the most nonsensical material can be published.'
I would add to this my own observation that it is even sadder that Gardiner's book became the fourth-most sold Titanic work in the late 1990s. That's even above Eaton & Haas! I bought a copy and found it very useful whenever I was feeling depressed -- I'd just read it and be laughing in stitches.
wink.gif


Best regards,

Mark.​
 
Nov 12, 2000
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actually, I find this phenomenon most interesting, and rather depressing. Gardiner is certainly one of the best selling authors of modern Titanic books in the UK. on our side of the pond one of the most successful modern authors, perhaps the most successful, is Charles Pellegrino.

there are not a lot of similarities between the two authors, but they both sell lots & lots of books despite the fact that their books not well thought of by most readers who have studied the subject in depth (no pun intended).

I certainly don't begrudge these men the success they have attained,
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
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Some time ago, an eminent Australian businessman lamented that if he advertised products he didn't have, or that didn't do what he claimed they would do, he would rightfully be prosecuted. However, any stupid or unscrupulous writer could publish a book of insufferable twaddle and swindle the gullible. There are quite a few of these around outside the Titanic field, for instance the recent book about the WTC attack.

Apparently freedom of expression includes freedom to swindle, provided it's presented as research.