Question Titanic Ticket Sales


Jul 14, 2012
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Hello

Could you please tell me when tickets for Titanic (any class but particularly Second) went on sale? Month or day would be great. Thanks.

Ellie
 
Jul 4, 2020
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i found this, it looked like you had to have a tickets to watch her be moved, to be kitted out, before she set sail Arril 10th 1912. I have looked everywere for the date of the ticket sales for her first trip and can't find the answer anywere i know the date was pushed back so maybe there is no record of this
 

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May 3, 2005
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Frome looks of the ticket it would seem the date of the launch would have been 31 March 1911.
But no idea how far in advance of the launch the tickets would have gone on sale. ???
Or how much the tickets for the launch cost ?

Incidentally:
The launch scene in the (1958) "A Night To Remember" is said to be in error - there was no Christening ceremony as depicted in the movie. One worker is said to have remarked of Harland and Wolfe "They just builds them and pushes them in !"
Also the scene showing of the launch - the ship.slipping down into the water , etc. -
is said to be from the launch of RMS Queen Elizabeth in 1938. If you look closely in the scene, and in a quick glimpse, there is a woman in the crowd dressed in the styles of 1938.
 
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May 3, 2005
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Just an addition since timed out from previous post.

Correction to my previous post :
I think the question was really about when tickets went on sale for the voyage rather than for the launch.

Wonder how many actually signed up or bought tickets in advance since there were so many vacancies available on the maiden voyage ?
In reality Mr. Sturges wouldn't have had any problem in buying a ticket at Cherbourg ? LOL
Was the occupancy expected to be much larger on the return voyage eastbound or is there any information on ticket sales in America ?
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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It was the custom at H & W to sell tickets to launchings. I think they cost around two shillings, but I'm open to correction. The proceeds went to Belfast charities, notably children's hospitals. The example shown is a rare unused one. There are some fakes around, especially some that are copied from a ticket with a crease across it.

In the 1953 and 1997 movies a basic mistake is made with the tickets. The tickets had the names of the passengers on them, so Sturgess, Jack and Fabrizio couldn't have used other people's tickets. As Americans, they would have had a hard job proving they were Basques etc.
 
May 3, 2005
2,599
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It was the custom at H & W to sell tickets to launchings. I think they cost around two shillings, but I'm open to correction. The proceeds went to Belfast charities, notably children's hospitals. The example shown is a rare unused one. There are some fakes around, especially some that are copied from a ticket with a crease across it.

In the 1953 and 1997 movies a basic mistake is made with the tickets. The tickets had the names of the passengers on them, so Sturgess, Jack and Fabrizio couldn't have used other people's tickets. As Americans, they would have had a hard job proving they were Basques etc.
On that visit to RMS Queen Mary in New York I think they charged a dollar or two for the visitor's pass, but very little and it certainly was a bargain.The proceeds went to a Seamen's Relief Fund.

I think it would have been harder trying to prove you were a Basque with an American accent than trying to prove you were an American with a Basque accent.

Do ships still offer visiting hours such as those on the Queen Mary ?

Back to Titanic:
At any rate , with the Titanic far from "Being sold out since March" Sturges would have had no problems in buying a ticket in any class. But I am not at all surprised at finding mistakes in the 1953 "Titanic". LOL . Someone has remarked "You can do anything you want to do in the movies."
But maybe the number of passengers vs. the number of vacancies wasn't known in 1953 ?

I don't know whether I would have enjoyed the film more or less if the Encyclopedia Titanica website had been around in 1953. Maybe more so, but I would always be waiting to see the next mistake throughout the movie.

Couldn't help from mentioning another. In the scene where they are getting some of the lifeboats off the deck. A WWII Navy rubber life raft is shown being taken down.

Did the tickets show the name of the country of the passenger was from as well as the name of the passenger ?
 
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Aly Jones

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Dec 15, 2019
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I don't know the answer to your question, sorry.

There was no ID (nor passports or visas) as such like how we have today. So buying tickets would be so much quicker and easier than today, as for travelling into wsl officer to actually buying the ticket, that's a different story.

I know on the return trip people had already booked their passage on titanic. My opinion is, you could buy a return ticket at the same time as purchasing maiden voyage ticket.
 
May 3, 2005
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I am assuming that what you are calling a "return ticket" is what is called a "round trip ticket" in the United States ? I would think the return ticket would have an advantage of getting the same cabin in advance on both directions.

If so the Queen Mary 2 has a comment that the price for such a ticket is basically the same as the price for two one-way tickets.
Would there have been any difference from this in 1912 or a discount for purchasing a return ticket ?
 

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