News Titanic: What Happened To Ismay After The Ship Sank (& Was He Blamed?)

M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
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...The only place you see search lights used on a ship as a matter of routine are on Great Lakes bulkers, and at that, only for maneuvering in highly restricted waters. Out on the open ocean, they just aren't practical.

I read that it was recommended even at that time:

"Technology and Safety Advances:
The most significant findings of the Titanic investigations led to the creation of new safety and technology regulations. Shipping lanes--the highways of the Atlantic Ocean--were adjusted farther south of areas known to contain icebergs. Electric searchlights mounted on ships' bows were recommended to raise visibility at night. Laws regarding iceberg reports, distress signal rockets, and watertight bulkheads were all updated. ... Ships were required to carry enough lifeboats to accommodate all people on board. ...Now ships were required to have a wireless operator on duty 24 hours a day in order to communicate all messages received, with priority for navigation..."

(pg. 94-95 in Famous Ships: The Titanic Story by Tristan Poehlmann; Content consultant: Sheryl Rinkol, Titanic Teacher and Presenter -- who has been studying the Titanic for more than 35 years. Abdo Publishing, 2018).
 
M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
Member
"...The navigation and orders given were entirely under the purview of Captain Smith and there was absolutely nothing at all unusual or remarkable about how the ship was managed. They kept to the practice of the day and that was the part which turned out to be dangerously flawed..."

One of the dangerous flaws that comes to my mind is that the poor captain didn't receive the latest ice warnings, so he couldn't react accordingly in time. Earlier, the captain had responded to a warning by changing course a bit. But if he had known that at 9:40pm the Mesaba ship reported "much heavy pack ice and great number large icebergs..." I feel like that would've given him pause. Alas, that message got stuck on the Marconi "slush pile." And the Californian shut down communication after trying to warn them, which also wasn't passed along to the captain. I wonder what the captain would've commanded, had he heard these? It just doesn't make any sense to me: they could hardly see out there, they're going way too fast, and they're all positive that they'll be fine. It almost seems like the kind of impaired thinking that people suffer from when they drink and drive irresponsibly. I wonder if any of them were under the influence, thus affecting their critical thinking skills. I'm so glad the practice of the day has been improved quite a bit.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
I read that it was recommended even at that time:

And ultimately rejected. There's a reason for that. To a watch stander
, night vision is everything, as is being able to see everything ahead of you and around you. A huge beam of dazzling brilliant light trashes that.

I know this from first-hand experience when a ship I was on had to use searchlights for a search and rescue operation. Searchlights are there for use if there is an immediate need but they are not used for routine navigation. That's why you have both lookouts and radar.
One of the dangerous flaws that comes to my mind is that the poor captain didn't receive the latest ice warnings, so he couldn't react accordingly in time. Earlier, the captain had responded to a warning by changing course a bit.

None of that is true. There was no course change, and they had warnings. Not all of them but they had sufficient warning that the watch was given special instructions to keep a lookout for pack ice, growlers, and bergy bits.

They knew.
 
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Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

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P.S...how did the conference go?

The conference went very well. If you know where my Facebook page is, I have over 500 photos in a public access album if you care to drop by and check them out.
 
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M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
Member
Where did you read that there was no course change? (I'm trying to read everything I can.) For example, the Encyclopedia Britannica states:

"5:50 PM
After receiving iceberg warnings throughout the day, Captain Smith changes the Titanic's course, heading slightly south. However, the ship's speed is not lowered."

(Timeline of the Titanic’s Final Hours)

p.s. I like that term, "bergy bits." It'd be funny if it wasn't so sad.
 
M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
Member
I definitely can't speak from personal boating experience, but it still seems sensible to me that ships be provided some type of lights as an option to use as needed for a variety of peculiar or practical circumstances.

p.s. is it not possible to dim the ship lights, like we can for house light switches? So that they wouldn't be too bright? Or what if the light wasn't bright white? Could it be more like an ocean shade, but lighter -- to blend in yet illumine the path ahead at least? I'm just curious. I haven't been on a ship or boat since I was a little kid, 30 years ago. I don't know anything about this kind of stuff, so it fascinates me.
 
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Seumas

Seumas

Member
Where did you read that there was no course change? (I'm trying to read everything I can.) For example, the Encyclopedia Britannica states:

"5:50 PM
After receiving iceberg warnings throughout the day, Captain Smith changes the Titanic's course, heading slightly south. However, the ship's speed is not lowered."

(Timeline of the Titanic’s Final Hours)

p.s. I like that term, "bergy bits." It'd be funny if it wasn't so sad.
Yes, he did alter course - but only slightly.

As Dave Gittins showed a number of years back, had Smith altered course just over twenty or so miles further south, he would very likely have missed the ice altogether and added only a mere thirty three minutes to his voyage time.

Brian Hill and Alan Ruffman's research showed, Edward Smith had previously encountered ice in the same vicinity a number of times before. In fact, in 1903 whilst in charge of the Germanic he had reported an iceberg at a location not far from where he and the Titanic would be lost nine years later. He ought to have known better.
 
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Steven Christian

Steven Christian

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The conference went very well. If you know where my Facebook page is, I have over 500 photos in a public access album if you care to drop by and check them out.
I will check it out. Thanks. Glad it went well for you guys. Sounds like fun and sure this time of year is nice in that part of the country. Hope you guys got to over indulge in some good southern food. I wouldn't be able to resist. Cheers.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
I definitely can't speak from personal boating experience, but it still seems sensible to me that ships be provided some type of lights as an option to use as needed for a variety of peculiar or practical circumstances.

Did you even bother to read what I wrote?:confused:
Searchlights DO exist on ships for the exceptional circumstances that come up.
I've been involved in one of those exceptional circumstances, specifically a search and rescue operation looking for a crashed helicopter out in the Persian Gulf.
They are NOT used for routine navigation out on the open ocean and have only a very limited utility in restricted waterways. The cause more problems than they solve.
 
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M.A.S.

M.A.S.

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You'll have to pardon my ignorance; I'm but a silly bookworm-ish landlubber, full of whim and worry. ;)
 
Steven Christian

Steven Christian

Member
I will check it out. Thanks. Glad it went well for you guys. Sounds like fun and sure this time of year is nice in that part of the country. Hope you guys got to over indulge in some good southern food. I wouldn't be able to resist. Cheers.
I went and checked out your pics. Looks like a good time had by all. From your pics it looks like you guys ate well. I need to get there someday. The place looks really interesting. A coincidence that they had a display about the Kosher kitchen on Titanic. I had just learned about that the other day looking up info on Titanic's galley/ovens. Just a brief observation. There didn't seem to be very many younger people there. Maybe it was just the pics you took. I just bring it up because I watched an interesting video the other night about us Boomer's and how when we depart many things that are valuable today won't be in the future...like classic cars, Gibson guitars, art works..ect. I wonder if Titanic and history in general is going to be part of that. Anyway glad you guys had fun. Cheers.
P.S... U.S.S Ranger. I remember seeing her at North Island.
 
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Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

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We had an interesting range of speakers and guests, like Maggie Bailey who is running RMSTI and looks set to undo the damage done by Arnie Geller's crowd. Oh, this photo I did was something I staged for the benefit of the blokes who thought the Titanic was trying to break a speed record. Just a little sarcasm here!

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Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
This is me in a replica life belt next to the actual life belt worn by Madeline Astor.

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Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
Before I forget, this is the group photo of our gang on the Grand Staircase. This is an exact replica of the Grand Staircase as it appeared from A Deck going up to the Boat Deck. Up from on the right is Dr. Shelley Binder, who is a descendant of Leah Aks, and beside her is the son of survivor Frank Goldsmith, Frank Goldsmith Jr.

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