News Titanic: What Happened To Ismay After The Ship Sank (& Was He Blamed?)

Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
Wow. I hope you had special access. They don't let people paw that original I hope. Always nice to see the original artifacts. Cheers.
Oh, nobody was touching that without permission and the special gloves museum people use when handling fragile artifacts. Paul Burns, one of the curators of the museum attraction, was there the entire time and made sure everything was done by the numbers.
 
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M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
Member
We had an interesting range of speakers and guests, like Maggie Bailey who is running RMSTI and looks set to undo the damage done by Arnie Geller's crowd. Oh, this photo I did was something I staged for the benefit of the blokes who thought the Titanic was trying to break a speed record. Just a little sarcasm here!

View attachment 110764

24 knots :) (but ha, cute). Stay safe out there. Live long and prosper.
 
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Steven Christian

Steven Christian

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I definitely can't speak from personal boating experience, but it still seems sensible to me that ships be provided some type of lights as an option to use as needed for a variety of peculiar or practical circumstances.

p.s. is it not possible to dim the ship lights, like we can for house light switches? So that they wouldn't be too bright? Or what if the light wasn't bright white? Could it be more like an ocean shade, but lighter -- to blend in yet illumine the path ahead at least? I'm just curious. I haven't been on a ship or boat since I was a little kid, 30 years ago. I don't know anything about this kind of stuff, so it fascinates me.
Parks wrote this 20 years ago. You probably don't know him or of him as he scrubbed his sites off the web. Fortunantly The Wayback archived a lot of his stuff. I copied most to my Titanic/Ships folder. Anyway its a interesting article on searchlights. Cheers.
 
M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
Member
Aha -- that is very fascinating how it explains it more. (Can't say that I really totally "get it" yet, but I'm always open to researching different sources). Thanks for sharing that. Thank goodness for the International Ice Patrol now. One remaining worry with that though, still, is what is says here -- that "radar that can detect icebergs in all but the roughest sea conditions." So what do they do then? (International Ice Patrol). It seems like there's always a "blind spot" with each and every type of method for avoiding icebergs. (Other than perhaps just slowing down or stopping. Or avoiding the oceans that contain them. Or flying. Or being a landlubber, like me, and staying home watching Ice Age with that cute little squirrel, Scrat, instead. Hey now we really know who the rightful scapegoat should be:
... just some comic relief). ;)
 
M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
Member
Parks wrote this 20 years ago. You probably don't know him or of him as he scrubbed his sites off the web. Fortunantly The Wayback archived a lot of his stuff. I copied most to my Titanic/Ships folder. Anyway its a interesting article on searchlights. Cheers.

:O Another article I read, which admits to the opposing viewpoints about searchlights to show its pros and cons:
Why No Searchlights On Titanic? (Written during the centennial year, 2012).

We can't say for sure if the searchlight would have prevented the collision... the end of this article simply asks us...

But imagine the headlines that might have been: April 17, 1912, edition of the New York Herald:
(New York) “We learned today from passengers on her maiden voyage that the White Star liner, Titanic, nearly collided with an iceberg in the early morning of April 15th. Titanic, pinnacle of the modern shipbuilder’s art, was saved from damage by an electrical arc searchlight. The guardian beacon of light alerted the officers of Titanic in time to steer away from danger. The captain noted that a collision, though unlikely to have been serious, might have inconvenienced the great ship.”
 
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