Titanic World to be built in Mississippi


Dec 4, 2000
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From the news article, the pseudo-ship will be stood on end, since it will be 882 feet "tall." Will guests sleep on their feet?

-- David G. Brown
 

Jeremy Lee

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Jun 12, 2003
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"sloppy picture research"!!!

Only fools with so much money to build a exact replica will do so little research.
Maybe they wanted to give the guests a little sinking feeling!
mad.gif
 

John Clifford

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Nov 12, 2000
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I'm going to forward that story to a friend, and former coworker, who recently moved to Mississippi. He'll enjoy reading it, and will probably note any discrepancies we may miss.
 

Dan Cherry

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Mar 3, 2000
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I've seen end products of "exact replicas" on reconstructed things before, too, and their take on "exact replica" often differs from the rest of the world...
 
A

Andrew Williams

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If the latest purposes for the Mississippi adventure sounds good, then spare a thought for Southampton. The latest plans to accommodate a new Maritime museum, remains temporary shelved, and up in the clouds.


Andrew W.
 

Jeremy Lee

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Jun 12, 2003
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They should build this kind of thing at places of significant relation, like Southampton, Cobh etc. but it seems these king of replicating work is undertaken only in US, trying to convert it 'Hollywood style' would not give it the due respect.

If a full scale exact replica of the Titanic is ever built, lets hope its for historical purposes and not amusement.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
I doubt that Southampton or even Cobh would take very kindly to this sort of thing. The Titanic is a bit more personal to them and I suspect they would be notably unamused at a Titanic amusement park.

As to a full scale replica, while such a thing may be technically feasible in the broadest terms, as a matter of practical reality, it ain't gonna happen. You might want to poke around in some earlier threads for more on that.
 

Jeremy Lee

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Jun 12, 2003
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>>I doubt that Southampton or even Cobh would take very kindly to this sort of thing. The Titanic is a bit more personal to them and I suspect they would be notably unamused at a Titanic amusement park.<<

That is why I would hate it if the Titanic replica is used as an amusement park/ resort/ leisure complex etc. It really spoils the taste.
Making money isn't everything....

As for the full scale replica, a replica 882.6 ft could be built, minus the rivets and engines. If the rooms are done to Cameron's accuracy in the movie, it would be good enough.
 

Dan Cherry

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Mar 3, 2000
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In terms of building a replica, though, "good enough" would not be acceptable. I again am reminded of a quote several years ago by our fellow ET'er, Captain David Brown, which sums it up nicely, in my opinion:

"An exact replica is impossible. Anything less is fraud."

"If a full scale exact replica of the Titanic is ever built, lets hope it's for historical purposes and not amusement."

Unfortunately, a constructed tribute to Titanic built for merely historical purposes doesn't pay the bills. In any attraction, there must be an element to draw the crowds and keep them coming back. This is where making the draw of an 'amusement park', or some such other marketing target comes into play. Many true museums constrantly struggle for funding to stay open.

"Making money isn't everything...."

When it comes to recouping costs and keeping an attraction open and to turn a profit, it sure is!

As Michael indicates in his above post, this topic in varying forms has been done to death several times over in previous threads. See "Titanic Reborn", "TITANIC semi-working REPLICA could, in fact, be built", "Another TITANIC should be built!" among other dead-end threads.

Building a replicated Titanic cannot, and will not happen. As much as I, myself, would love to walk a carefully reconstructed tribute to the ship TItanic, reality dictates that something this epic for monetary, safety and historical reasons is nothing more than a pie-in-the-sky notion; a notion that many, many people have been finding out, the hard way, is indeed impossible over the past several years. Not one of the ambitious ideas has come to fruition. I am detecting a pattern, here...

The other thing that bothers me is that across the board, Titanic has become somewhat of an entertainment icon. In an increasing fashion, the tragedy that was Titanic has been watered down into an entertainment source - Titanic rides, models that break up and sink, to name a few.
What's next? Will we be seeing "Escape the World Trade Center Before it Collapses" board or video games in 50 years?
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>"An exact replica is impossible. Anything less is fraud."<<

Brother, ain't that the truth. And for reasons that may come as a surprise to some people. It's not just a question of retooling and training people in obsolete shipbuilding technologies, which would be costly in it's own right. There's also the fact that we don't know what every single space on the ship even looked like. Quite a few of the records and plans have been destroyed or lost and the photographic record is so sketchy that the Olympic was typically used as a stand in to represent the ship.

>>Not one of the ambitious ideas has come to fruition. I am detecting a pattern, here... <<

Can you say "wishful thinking?" Hell, can you say "fraud?" Some of the schemes I've seen came and went so quickly that I suspect some were little more then scams intended to seperate the rubes from their cash.

>>What's next? Will we be seeing "Escape the World Trade Center Before it Collapses" board or video games in 50 years?<<

Why wait that long? I'd be shocked if something to that effect didn't appear in the vidio arcades sometime in the very near future. If they don't exist yet, it's almost a sure thing that somebody is planning it.
 

Kyrila Scully

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Apr 15, 2001
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I recall the same thing was attempted in Las Vegas and failed to come to fruition. And to locate it in Mississippi? Puh-leeze! That's as absurd as putting the London Bridge in Arizona. Oh, wait! They DID that.

Kyrila
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Apparently the chap who's supposedly the brains behind this has offered up ideas like this befor. From the article:
quote:

It's not the first time Morse has proposed such a project. His first attempt was in New Brunswick, N.H., in the late 1980s. He also considered sites in Greenville and in parts of Georgia. In each case, Morse ended up backing out of the project.
I personally don't have any heartburn with how much somebody spends on some scheme. Hell, it does serve to create jobs and it does filter in to the economy, but I have doubts about this projects feasability simply as a practical matter. (Never mind my personal objections to turning mass death into a sideshow.)

Anyone who thinks the centrepiece is going to be even a credible replica of the real thing is going to be in for a whopper of a shock. This assumes it's even built which I tend to doubt'll even happen. As Kyrila mentioned, these schemes have come and gone. I have a hunch this one will quietly fade away as well.​
 

Jeremy Lee

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Jun 12, 2003
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It seems strange that what people built with much less advanced technology today cannot be replicated by our advancement in technology today!
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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It's not just a matter of changing technology. Back in 1912 there were lots of highly skilled workers who could be employed for little pay. White Star and other Lines had the same advantage in operating their ships. Making adjustments for the increased purchasing power of the pound, few of the people who built and crewed the Titanic were paid much more than the modern equivalent of £1 an hour for their efforts.