Titanic's Artifacts

  • Thread starter James J. Krehely
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James J. Krehely

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How would I be able to determine if an item was a standard issue to the Titanic? I have a ceramic horse vase that was allegedly on the Titanic. It was given to me by my aunt. Her husband's mother and sons were survivors from the Titanic. The vase is not marked with the White-Star Line flag, and her in-laws relatives have all but vanished. What are the chances that some survivors took items into the lifeboats with them?

Jim
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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First, check on this site and find out if the relatives really were survivors. Phoney Titanic crew and passengers are a dime a dozen

If they really were on board, your search can start. A few odd things did reach the boats, such as the books Lawrence Beesley stuck in his pockets and Edith Russell's pig shaped music box. A vase sounds unlikely but you never know. Try old photos, of which the Ulster Transport and Heritage Museum has a big pile.
 

Pat Cook

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Hi Dave,

You wrote: > A few odd things did reach the boats, such as the books Lawrence Beesley <

I may be reading you wrong but you seem to imply that Beesley got these from the Titanic. According to the Christian Science article he wrote later, the two books he took were his own copies of Mary Baker Eddy's "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures" and the Holy Bible. During this time, especially on trips (although this was his one and only sea voyage), he was never without these two books.

Again, I may have misread your post.

Best regards,
Cook
 

Dave Gittins

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Beesley merely refers to them as "two books I was reading". Your story makes sense. He was probably referring back and forth between the two books.
 

Pat Cook

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I know what you mean. I thought he had 'nicked' a couple of books myself until I read his C S Journal article.

Best regards,
Cook
 
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James J. Krehely

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My Aunt's in-laws were indeed on the vessel as evidenced from the passenger list from the National Archives. That is, the list of survivors from the Carpathia. They have also been written up in the papers. I have tried to see if there were any objects from photos on these sites to no avail. I suppose it could have been a souvenir from the old country. But, I will keep looking.

Jim
 
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James J. Krehely

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There names were William, George and Amenia Borek. They were travelling companions with their cousins Charles and Thelma Thomas. They were travelling 3rd class. Amenia was separated in the confusion on deck from the boys (age 6 & 4), and someone put life-jackets on the boys and threw them overboard. George was picked up from the waters into a lifeboat by his aunt, Cecil Decker; and, William was pulled into another lifeboat. Amenia was put into a boat as Titanic went down. Amenia thought her boys died and didn't know they survived until they were all reunited on the Carpathia. All were from Lebanon, at that time labeled on the manifest as Syria. Amenia, George, and William were originally bound for Clearfield, Pa. to be reunited with there father and husband George Borek. Amenia was 26 at the time of the sinking and after moving to Wilkes Barre, Pa. she had two more sons, Roy and Daniel. Daniel was my uncle, married to Margaret, my father's sister. Amenia later went back to Lebanon and died at age 33. 11 member of the Thomas/Borek family went down with the ship. The spelling of the name Borek has been changed many times through the years. On the Carpathia manifest list it is listed as George, the first name of Amenia's husband. It is sometimes listed as Moubarek or Moubarak (the old world spelling). In Walter Lord's novel, he erroneously lists it as Moncarek.



Jim
 
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