Titanic's Belfast-Southampton trip

Glad to help Jim, but I have a few questions:
  • A note above Titanic's listing says ''Brought Forward''. Would't that mean it possibly happened earlier?
  • So are the Officers actually referring to Titanic arrival in Southampton Water or the dock itself? Since they said Midnight, unless they went off duty or the clocks were inaccurate due to the time change from Dublin to Greenwich, it seems very odd.
 
Glad to help Jim, but I have a few questions:
  • A note above Titanic's listing says ''Brought Forward''. Would't that mean it possibly happened earlier?
  • So are the Officers actually referring to Titanic arrival in Southampton Water or the dock itself? Since they said Midnight, unless they went off duty or the clocks were inaccurate due to the time change from Dublin to Greenwich, it seems very odd.

Hello Martin.

"Brought forward" simply meant "continued from the previous page.

A ship has two times of arrival.
The first is when the measured voyage ends. That one is from F.a.o.p...Full away on passage, to E.o.p. End of Passage. That voyage is with the engines running continuously at FULL AHEAD (except for interruptions due to fog etc and they are logged.)
The second time of arrival is when the Captain rang Finish With Engines on the engine room telegraph. That only happened when the very last mooring rope was secured to the shore.

I can do no better than quote from the Article
"Olympic and Titanic : Maiden Voyage Mysteries...https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/contributor/samuel-halpern/Mark Chirnside.
"The westbound transatlantic passage officially began when the ship passed the Daunt’s Rock Light Vessel at 4:22 p.m. Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) outside of the harbor of Queenstown, and ended when the ship passed the Ambrose Channel Light Vessel at 2:24 a.m. New York Time (NYT) on June 21, 1911."

By the same token, the voyage round from Belfast on Titanic began when the pilot was dropped and ended when the pilot was picked up.
To do the latter those on Titanic would need to identify the Pilot Cutter in darkness, head for her, slowing down all the time then stopping to allow the pilot to board from a cutter launch. The ship would not move until the pilot was on the bridge. That operation alone would take a considerable time. There was no vhf in 1912 and all communications between shore stations and pilot vessels would have been by flashing signal lights. as a matter of interest, that very same system operated around the UK and at Gibraltar well into the 1960s. The shore stations would ask if they should notify owners. They would also notify Lloyds for insurance purposes.

Arrival time for a navigator was when his work ended and the pilot took over the navigation of the ship.

Any time change would not affect the navigators. They worked exclusively in GMT. It follows that any time they quoted was local time at Southampton.
 
Arriving in Southampton at midnight, finally at the dock at 1.15 a.m.
(Actually there is also a note that she arrived at Southampton - not at the dock - already by 11 a.m.)

Hello, Ioannis.

If Titanic was tied up at berth 44 White Star Dock at 1-15 am, then she would have had to have been off the dock entrance at least one hour earlier at 12-15 am. It would take one hour at the very least, to make tugs fast, turn the ship in complete darkness, tow her astern into her berth and make fast all her mooring lines. There can be no argument about that.
So it seems that in that case, she arrived off the berth just after Midnight.

However, if Titanic was, as recorded in the PV of the RMS Olympic, at The Lizard at 1-35 pm the previous afternoon, then she was at that moment, 200.75 miles from the entrance to the White Star Dock at Southampton.
To arrive off the dock at 12-15 am, she would need to steam 10 hours 30 minutes after she passed The Lizard. This means she would have needed to average a speed of no less than 200.75 divided by 10.5 = 19.12 knots the entire way. That is barely believable because the last 38 miles of the 200.75 miles would be transited at ever reducing speed down to 6 knots for the final 10 miles. During this time, she would stop for at least half an hour to find and pick up the pilot.
Add to the foregoing the fact that for at least 6 hours of the 10 hours 30 minutes, she would have been stemming a very strong tidal current and I think we must all agree that there is no way the Titanic could have been up at her berth by midnight that night.
 
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